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jazz's Avatar Jul 16, 2022 | 07:18 1 Chuck, thanks for the $372 tax refund. Sure makes that 8% inflation easier to handle. Did you get back more than you paid in.

Look at these low information dipshits letting scumbag Trudeau into their back yard to tell them all about it. There are some true morons in this country.

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Last edited by jazz; Jul 16, 2022 at 07:20.
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  • Jul 16, 2022 | 07:31 2 The Climate Action Incentive payment will be paid in quarterly instalments for the first time this year. In previous years, the payment was delivered as a component of tax returns.

    Here's how much a family of four will receive in total this year:

    $1,079 in Alberta.
    $1,101 in Saskatchewan.
    $832 in Manitoba.
    $745 in Ontario.

    Residents of small and rural communities will receive an extra 10 per cent on top of those amounts. Reply With Quote
    Jul 16, 2022 | 07:40 3 If the relatively small carbon tax is really bad for the economy then the current market price for oil and gas must be even more terrible don't you think?

    By all accounts the economy should be completely dead and on life support because of high oil.

    Because the 11 cents a litre carbon tax is relatively small compared to the current prices for gas and diesel and the profit margin the oil industry is much much larger than 11 cents per litre.

    But these little details are hardly ever acknowledged. Reply With Quote
    Jul 16, 2022 | 07:50 4
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    The Climate Action Incentive payment will be paid in quarterly instalments for the first time this year. In previous years, the payment was delivered as a component of tax returns.

    Here's how much a family of four will receive in total this year:

    $1,079 in Alberta.
    $1,101 in Saskatchewan.
    $832 in Manitoba.
    $745 in Ontario.

    Residents of small and rural communities will receive an extra 10 per cent on top of those amounts.
    What is really funny is that the credit on the tax return wasn’t visible enough, it wasn’t having its desired effect. It wasn’t buying any votes. Now Justin Trudeau is pretending these payments will help Canadian’s cope with inflation. He forgets to mention you have already payed more in carbon tax than you get back, typical Liberal math! Reply With Quote

  • Jul 16, 2022 | 07:56 5
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    If the relatively small carbon tax is really bad for the economy then the current market price for oil and gas must be even more terrible don't you think?

    By all accounts the economy should be completely dead and on life support because of high oil.

    Because the 11 cents a litre carbon tax is relatively small compared to the current prices for gas and diesel and the profit margin the oil industry is much much larger than 11 cents per litre.

    But these little details are hardly ever acknowledged.
    Let’s look at this another way Chuck2. The price of gasoline is roughly 90 cents a litre higher than last year. The consumption of gasoline has not declined. How is an 11 cent carbon tax going to change consumption habits? Especially one that the Prime Minister claims he fully rebates back to 80% of Canadians? Reply With Quote

  • fjlip's Avatar Jul 16, 2022 | 09:36 6 Smoke and mirrors shell game, only the DUMBEST lefties can't see that! Reply With Quote

  • Jul 16, 2022 | 19:02 7 Carbon tax plus GST for you slow fuks Reply With Quote

  • Jul 17, 2022 | 05:23 8 Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 17, 2022 | 07:32 9 Bottom line, the price of energy and other commodities are much higher primarily because of the market forces of supply and demand and geopolitical disruptions.

    The carbon tax in Canada is only adding a relatively small amount to the higher prices. Case in point US consumers are also being hit with high energy prices with no carbon tax. Their core inflation rate is higher than Canada.

    A lot of the carbon tax is being rebated back to average consumers. Oil and gas companies are not rebating their excess profits back to consumers.

    High energy prices because of supply and demand definitely affect consumer demand and will contribute to the coming economic slow down and recession. Reply With Quote
    Jul 17, 2022 | 08:05 10
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Bottom line, the price of energy and other commodities are much higher primarily because of the market forces of supply and demand and geopolitical disruptions.

    The carbon tax in Canada is only adding a relatively small amount to the higher prices. Case in point US consumers are also being hit with high energy prices with no carbon tax. Their core inflation rate is higher than Canada.

    A lot of the carbon tax is being rebated back to average consumers. Oil and gas companies are not rebating their excess profits back to consumers.

    High energy prices because of supply and demand definitely affect consumer demand and will contribute to the coming economic slow down and recession.
    Last weekend we had a family function in Salmon Arm BC. I was sitting around visiting with my sister in law. It was kind of funny she brought up the drive out. For her she lives in Red Deer it was just under 650 km. We got to discussing gas prices. She drives a Mazda CX-3. I was fairly impressed she said she filled once on the way and cost her $50. Her daughter and son in law drive a plug in Kia Niro Ev. They had to stop twice to charge and it cost them $42. What was interesting was my sister in law had more left in her gas tank by percentage than they did as percentage of charge in their battery when they arrived and it took then 2 hours longer to get there due to charging time to save $8 dollars. This is an actual example not some Liberal fantasy espoused by Stephen Guilbeault!! Lol.

    So Chuck2 if your talking actual cost of travel, yes the plug in electric is a little cheaper but what is your time worth? And I have to admit at today’s gas prices I thought the electric car would save more money!
    Last edited by Hamloc; Jul 17, 2022 at 08:09.
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  • Jul 17, 2022 | 08:23 11 Already had this discussion last winter with A4.

    If you charge at home with your own electricity the savings are much greater. Especially if you have a solar PV system that reduces your costs even further or live in a low cost electricity province like Quebec or Manitoba that has much cheaper hydro.

    It would be good to have A4 comment on his Tesla experience again and compare the numbers.


    A very fuel efficient small ICE car is still the most affordable and effective option to reduce transportation costs and emissions.

    But most of the market was/is for larger less efficient vehicles.


    Now the market for high fuel efficiency ICE, EVs and hybrids is taking off.

    Owning a gas guzzling pickup or large SUV as a primary vehicle when you really don't need one in the suburbs has a huge cost premium.
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jul 17, 2022 at 08:29.
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    Jul 17, 2022 | 08:34 12
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Already had this discussion last winter with A4.

    If you charge at home with your own electricity the savings are much greater. Especially if you have a solar PV system that reduces your costs even further or live in a low cost electricity province like Quebec or Manitoba that has much cheaper hydro.

    It would be good to have A4 comment on his Tesla experience again and compare the numbers.


    A very fuel efficient small ICE car is still the most affordable and effective option to reduce transportation costs and emissions.

    But most of the market was/is for larger less efficient vehicles.


    Now the market for high fuel efficiency ICE, EVs and hybrids is taking off.

    Owning a gas guzzling pickup or large SUV as a primary vehicle when you really don't need one in the suburbs has a huge cost premium.
    So 2 vehicles on the same road driven the same day in the same weather isn’t an accurate comparison? Reply With Quote
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  • Partners's Avatar Jul 17, 2022 | 09:00 13 Compare the same trip in the winter..
    Gormley stated 700 EV in sask..out of 1 million people..
    That should be enough to save us..
    The promo is that charging is free at home...
    Wonder what will happen when people refuse to buy EV? Reply With Quote
    jazz's Avatar Jul 17, 2022 | 10:28 14 A4 should chime in again and I can tell him Tesla is going to zero. Without govt subsidies that zombie company is as good as dead and buried. Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 17, 2022 | 11:50 15
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Already had this discussion last winter with A4.

    If you charge at home with your own electricity the savings are much greater. Especially if you have a solar PV system that reduces your costs even further or live in a low cost electricity province like Quebec or Manitoba that has much cheaper hydro.

    It would be good to have A4 comment on his Tesla experience again and compare the numbers.


    A very fuel efficient small ICE car is still the most affordable and effective option to reduce transportation costs and emissions.

    But most of the market was/is for larger less efficient vehicles.


    Now the market for high fuel efficiency ICE, EVs and hybrids is taking off.

    Owning a gas guzzling pickup or large SUV as a primary vehicle when you really don't need one in the suburbs has a huge cost premium.
    Not going to disagree here, especially your last sentence. Charging stations at home are not free , so it’s the EV plus the cost of the at home charging station that needs to be factored as one
    Suggest you go to some website where the Suburbia folks hang out and shame them , most of us here need a pickup to operate our farms on nearly a daily basis . Carry out your vandetta somewhere else .
    Last edited by furrowtickler; Jul 17, 2022 at 13:45.
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  • blackpowder's Avatar Jul 17, 2022 | 12:04 16 Revenue Neutral Tax.
    If you still believe that oxymoron, you're an idiot.
    Everything in our lives depends on the stored solar energy found in hydrocarbons.
    This is a not so cleverly disguised consumption tax to increase general revenues.
    And yes, grocery and fuel bills are double what they were a short time ago.
    In the future maybe PMs should post their receipts over and above what the govt pays for. Reply With Quote

  • Jul 17, 2022 | 13:11 17
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Already had this discussion last winter with A4.

    If you charge at home with your own electricity the savings are much greater. Especially if you have a solar PV system that reduces your costs even further .
    Was that the same discussion where he kept telling you you didn't have a clue what you were talking about because you were insisting that we should be using electric vehicles as grid storage batteries? Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Jul 17, 2022 | 14:22 18 Not to mention that charging at home means never going far from it.
    Which the majority of people don't do I suppose. How can Chuck live in Sask and have a desire for all to live like Toronto? Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 17, 2022 | 18:59 19 Ford Lightning ev pickup reportedly has a range of 54 miles when pulling a camper trailer.
    We are about 1hr 20 min from Candle Lake with no charging station likely ever coming.
    Pulling the camper you would have the option of pulling over and running power plant on the camper for 3 or 4 hrs.

    Kind of kills the possibility of a fishing tour of the northern lakes.

    It would seem there might be a big opportunity for high end Motorhomes to take advantage of the lower cost per mile of the EV option but range might be an issue? Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 17, 2022 | 19:06 20
    Quote Originally Posted by Hamloc View Post
    Last weekend we had a family function in Salmon Arm BC. I was sitting around visiting with my sister in law. It was kind of funny she brought up the drive out. For her she lives in Red Deer it was just under 650 km. We got to discussing gas prices. She drives a Mazda CX-3. I was fairly impressed she said she filled once on the way and cost her $50. Her daughter and son in law drive a plug in Kia Niro Ev. They had to stop twice to charge and it cost them $42. What was interesting was my sister in law had more left in her gas tank by percentage than they did as percentage of charge in their battery when they arrived and it took then 2 hours longer to get there due to charging time to save $8 dollars. This is an actual example not some Liberal fantasy espoused by Stephen Guilbeault!! Lol.

    So Chuck2 if your talking actual cost of travel, yes the plug in electric is a little cheaper but what is your time worth? And I have to admit at today’s gas prices I thought the electric car would save more money!
    And that $8 wouldn't even come close to paying the road taxes let alone all of the other taxes on fuel that the EV drivers are getting a free ride on so far. Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 18, 2022 | 05:55 21 ‘You’re further ahead with an EV’: How EV owners weather massive power outages
    Krystyna Lagowski
    Special to The Globe and Mail
    Published July 15, 2022

    When a huge storm snuffed out hydroelectric power in many parts of Ontario and Quebec in May, not only were many electric vehicle (EV) owners able to keep driving, but they also weren’t left in the dark.

    Raymond Leury, president of the Electric Vehicle Council of Ottawa, a non-profit that promotes electric vehicle adoption, didn’t hear of any EV owners who were left high and dry, even as many Ottawa-area residents lost electricity for more than 10 days.

    Leury thinks much of that can be attributed to the different mindset of EV owners. “Typically, you plug your EV in when you get home in the evening, so that it’s always at a high rate of charge in the morning,” he says. “You’re always starting every day with a full charge.”

    That’s different from owners of gas-powered cars, who might park their car with a quarter tank, assuming they can swing by a gas station whenever they need. Leury notes that gas pumps also need electricity to function. As a result, many of the gas stations just outside the blackout area had long lineups. Some even ran out of gas. “Really, you’re further ahead with an EV when the power goes out.”

    Ottawa-area resident Mike Banks had a 60-per-cent charge on his Hyundai Ioniq 5 when the storm hit. It’s one of the few EVs that is capable of using the car’s battery to charge electrical items. Banks ran an extension cord from his Ioniq 5 through the window of his house, to the kitchen and plugged in his fridge and some lights.

    Ottawa-area resident Mike Banks uses his Hyundai Ioniq 5 to power electrical items in his house, including a fridge and lights, after a storm knocked out power in May, 2022Handout

    Banks has the top trim Ioniq 5, with an extra outlet built in between the back seats. When he saw his neighbour across the street was also without power, Banks offered him some juice from the car. They ran a second extension cord across the street and plugged in the neighbour’s fridge. “I ran it for a day and a half, my house and his house, keeping everything on,” Banks says.

    When his area’s power came back on after 36 hours, he charged up his car to 80 per cent, and drove to his in-laws across town, who were still without electricity. He hooked up the car to their fridges, a freezer and lights. “I left it there for 10 days, and when I picked it up, it still had a 60-per-cent charge,” Banks said with a laugh. “Fridges and lights only use minimal power.”

    When the lights went out at Monique Beaulieu’s home in Whitby, Ont., she wasn’t worried. After all, she’d had her 2018 Hyundai Ioniq plugged in overnight and had a full charge. As soon as the power came back on after 10 hours, she offered up her Level 2 home charger to fellow EV owners on a Facebook EV owners group.

    “No one took me up on the offer,” says Beaulieu. She even added her charger to PlugShare, an EV charging locator app, which allows homeowners to list their home charging stations. But even then, she didn’t have any customers.

    She found it ironic when, shortly after the power went out, a few friends teased her. “They didn’t have power and they thought I was stuck,” Beaulieu recalls. “But the truth was the other way around. I was fine and could get around. They couldn’t find a gas station to fill their car’s gas tank.”

    According to Dan Wheeler, a representative at California-based EV locator app PlugShare, during the devastating Texas blackout of February, 2021, which lasted more than two weeks, fewer than 6 per cent of EV owners were unable to drive because of the blackout. Many had already topped up their vehicle batteries in anticipation of the storm, and a few had a battery energy storage system at home, like a Tesla Powerwall.

    Others reported that they used their EV to charge various devices, such as an internet router, and some even used their car as a warm place to sleep – without worrying about carbon monoxide fumes.

    Wheeler reports that a study done in June, 2022, which surveyed 6,999 EV drivers in Canada, found that 6 per cent had solar panels, while 3.5 per cent had battery-based energy storage systems. “We think that may be heavily indexed toward EV drivers, who want to be ready for a blackout,” he says. Wheeler has even heard rumours of EV owners who build their own home power walls from recycled e-scooter batteries.

    Home energy storage systems are tentatively becoming a reality, like Alectra Inc.’s Powerhouse Hybrid pilot project. In the City of Markham, which is a partner on this project along with Enbridge Inc. and Toronto Metropolitan University, 10 homes have been equipped with a basement battery that is charged by rooftop solar panels. Each home is a micro-grid, and is part of a system that allows Alectra to distribute energy more efficiently among participating houses, supply power back to the main grid when there is a surplus, or run independently of the main grid if there is a power outage.

    “The main objective of Powerhouse Hybrid is to reduce greenhouse gases, but it offers more outage protection, not just for the house, [but also for] electric vehicles,” says Neetika Sathe, vice-president of Alectra’s Green Energy and Technology Centre.

    The pilot project has been funded by various government subsidies. During the power outage in May, Powerhouse Hybrid participants said they had greater peace of mind, knowing they could keep their food cold, their phones running and their electric vehicles charged.

    Although the project hasn’t advanced to where homeowners could list their home chargers to the public for sharing during an outage, Sathe thinks it could happen. “I’m a firm believer in a shared economy,” she says. During the storm, she offered her neighbours a chance to use her home charger and generator to keep their homes up and running.

    Sathe sees energy sharing not just as an opportunity for people to list their chargers, but even earn environmental points (Alectra had a program where you could collect environmental points and exchange them for goods and services with participating local merchants) or cash. “I get goosebumps just thinking about it, because it’s the intuitive, right thing to do.” Reply With Quote
    Jul 18, 2022 | 06:02 22
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    Was that the same discussion where he kept telling you you didn't have a clue what you were talking about because you were insisting that we should be using electric vehicles as grid storage batteries?
    In fact EV batteries are already being used as back up power sources. And Ford is marketing their F150 Lightning as a backup power source. and on the job source of power. So yes EVs can act as storage batteries.

    What powers your smart phone and all your cordless tools? Your hot air, denial and misinformation? LOL
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jul 18, 2022 at 06:04.
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    Jul 19, 2022 | 07:53 23
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    In fact EV batteries are already being used as back up power sources. And Ford is marketing their F150 Lightning as a backup power source. and on the job source of power. So yes EVs can act as storage batteries.

    What powers your smart phone and all your cordless tools? Your hot air, denial and misinformation? LOL
    Chuck2 every battery has so many charging cycles before it no longer recharges. My cell phone for example would last 11/2 or 2 days when it was new per charge, now some days it doesn’t make it through 1 day. I have many cordless tools now useless because the batteries no longer charge. So yes you can use your EV to power other things but your simple shortening it’s useful life span. Reply With Quote
    Jul 19, 2022 | 08:10 24 Yes very true and batteries need to be replaced.

    But ICE cars also need to be replaced and the maintenance costs adds up over time.

    Battery technology will evolve and hopefully get a lot better, cleaner and cheaper as time goes on.

    In the transition phase of every new technology costs are usually higher and not as good tech as later versions.

    Remember what the first large cell phones cost and what their features were? Not very impressive compared to the ones we have now. Reply With Quote
    Jul 19, 2022 | 08:34 25
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Yes very true and batteries need to be replaced.

    But ICE cars also need to be replaced and the maintenance costs adds up over time.

    Battery technology will evolve and hopefully get a lot better, cleaner and cheaper as time goes on.

    In the transition phase of every new technology costs are usually higher and not as good tech as later versions.

    Remember what the first large cell phones cost and what their features were? Not very impressive compared to the ones we have now.
    So you are still living in the future for your EV and Renewable energy fiasco, and still living in the past when it comes to your blind support of vaccines.

    Which raises a question, do you ever exist in the here and now? Reply With Quote

  • Jul 20, 2022 | 07:17 26 So A5 you are an antivaxer? And you don't think vaccines are good and safe healthcare?

    But you can't produce any evidence to back up your claims that the covid vaccines in Alberta don't reduce deaths and hospitalizations? LOL

    Why not ask GM about the future of EVs? At a $35 billion dollar investment are they wrong? Or would you rather invest $35 billion in crypto currencies like Polarizing Polly?

    Chevrolet unveils all-electric Blazer with more than 500 kilometres of range
    Petrina Gentile
    Los angeles
    Special to The Globe and Mail
    Published Yesterday

    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/drive/article-chevrolet-unveils-all-electric-blazer-with-more-than-500-kilometres-of/

    Chevrolet is expanding its electric vehicle lineup, adding the 2024 Blazer mid-size SUV, which will start in the mid-$50,000 range when it arrives next summer and travel more than 500 kilometres on a full charge. Chevy has already announced that electric versions of the Silverado pickup truck and Equinox SUV are coming next year. It’s all part of GM’s plan to inject $35-billion into EV and autonomous vehicle product development globally and introduce 30 new EVs by 2025.
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jul 20, 2022 at 07:23.
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    blackpowder's Avatar Jul 20, 2022 | 07:31 27
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Yes very true and batteries need to be replaced.

    But ICE cars also need to be replaced and the maintenance costs adds up over time.

    Battery technology will evolve and hopefully get a lot better, cleaner and cheaper as time goes on.

    In the transition phase of every new technology costs are usually higher and not as good tech as later versions.

    Remember what the first large cell phones cost and what their features were? Not very impressive compared to the ones we have now.
    We didn't throw away the landline before cells worked. Cellular was consumer driven innovation.
    I get your analogy but half wrong. Reply With Quote
    Jul 20, 2022 | 08:00 28 Cmon man chuck said hopefully.just like any good person with buisness sense. Reply With Quote
    Jul 20, 2022 | 11:23 29 I’ve been trying to formulate a comment, but I am stuck at the fact that there are people who actually would willingly invite him into their home. Who would actually have the smarmy, gross, criminal in their home? Sick. Reply With Quote

  • fjlip's Avatar Jul 20, 2022 | 19:41 30
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    I’ve been trying to formulate a comment, but I am stuck at the fact that there are people who actually would willingly invite him into their home. Who would actually have the smarmy, gross, criminal in their home? Sick.
    Deaf illiterate blind to all his CRIMES...i guess. Those that believe in NOTHING need him to SAVE them, the country, planet. Reply With Quote
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