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Jul 20, 2022 | 19:50 31
Quote Originally Posted by binthere View Post
Cmon man chuck said hopefully.just like any good person with buisness sense.
Hope is always a good strategy. Especially in the middle of a "climate emergency", and with countless hundreds of billions of dollars being spent on renewable energies and battery powered cars, at the expense of any other viable options.

And I see he is still harping about batteries getting cheaper. I've already presented the information indicating that the exact opposite is occuring, and quite drastically too. But he is still waiting, and "hoping" for the price to come down so he can buy an imaginary electric car, to charge with his imaginary solar panels, on his imaginary farm. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • blackpowder's Avatar Jul 20, 2022 | 21:24 32 I'm still laughing at powering your home from your car.
    In the time it took for him to cut and paste that very short term solution, I can refuel the gen for another day with liquid solar energy from bulk tank or jerry can. What a maroon. Reply With Quote
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  • blackpowder's Avatar Jul 21, 2022 | 06:16 33 https://fb.watch/eo-e2sPFDN/ Reply With Quote
    Jul 21, 2022 | 06:36 34 I guess GM is investing an imaginary $35 billion dollars in imaginary EVs? LOL

    And nobody is using EV batteries to provide backup to power homes? And the Tesla that A4 drives doesn't really exist?

    And in Alberta those are imaginary solar panels and windmills they are putting up while switching imaginary coal plants to natural gas, don't exist?

    Renewables aren't going to replace all carbon based fosssil fuels anytime soon, but to claim that all the EVs and renewable investments are imaginary is quite the stretch of imagination.

    There must be a lot of imaginary farms producing imaginary renewable energy because the 2021 Census showed over 22,000 farms across Canada producing renewable energy.

    Farmers are transitioning towards renewable energy production


    In 2021, there were more than twice as many farms reporting renewable energy production than in the previous census. The number of farms reporting renewable energy production increased from 10,185 in the previous census to 22,576 in 2021.

    Expressed as a proportion of total farms, close to 1 in 8 farms in Canada (11.9%) reported some form of renewable energy production in 2021, more than double the rate (5.3%) in the previous census. Solar energy production remained the most common form of renewable energy production on Canadian farms, as the number of farms that reported producing this form of energy increased by 66.5% from the previous census to 2021.

    https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/220511/dq220511a-eng.htm
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jul 21, 2022 at 06:40.
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    Jul 21, 2022 | 06:50 35 From Bloomberg

    How Ford’s Electric Pickup Can Power Your House for 10 Days

    Transforming an F-150 Lightning into a backup generator means you can keep the lights on during blackouts. Here’s the extra equipment you’ll need to use the EV battery to power a home.

    "The extended-range Lightning’s 131 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion pack boasts almost 10 times the capacity of a Tesla Powerwall, an $11,000 home backup battery that can’t be driven to the supermarket. The Lightning is “a mini powerplant for your home,” says Jason Glickman, executive vice president for engineering, planning and strategy at California utility PG&E Corp. “It can support the grid on a hot summer day, when we have demand spiking.”

    “At scale, when these vehicles are enabled to send energy back to the grid, flex alerts and notices of grid emergencies will be a thing completely of the past,” adds Glickman, whose utility is testing how to integrate the truck into its management of the grid."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-05-31/how-the-ford-f-150-can-be-a-backup-home-generator Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jul 21, 2022 | 08:50 36 So according to Chuck's article, only 11.9% of Canadian Farms are using some form of renewable energy.
    Does this mean that photosynthesis has now been canceled along with all the other inconvenient laws of nature and physics?
    Every farm I know of is relying on photosynthesis as their primary source of energy. And it is the ultimate renewable energy source.
    Even intensive livestock is still using photosynthesis as their energy source, just one step removed. About the only exceptions would be hydroponics or enclosed greenhouses, or carpet farmers stuck in the basement with no windows. Reply With Quote
    Jul 21, 2022 | 09:44 37
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    From Bloomberg

    How Ford’s Electric Pickup Can Power Your House for 10 Days

    Transforming an F-150 Lightning into a backup generator means you can keep the lights on during blackouts. Here’s the extra equipment you’ll need to use the EV battery to power a home.

    "The extended-range Lightning’s 131 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion pack boasts almost 10 times the capacity of a Tesla Powerwall, an $11,000 home backup battery that can’t be driven to the supermarket. The Lightning is “a mini powerplant for your home,” says Jason Glickman, executive vice president for engineering, planning and strategy at California utility PG&E Corp. “It can support the grid on a hot summer day, when we have demand spiking.”

    “At scale, when these vehicles are enabled to send energy back to the grid, flex alerts and notices of grid emergencies will be a thing completely of the past,” adds Glickman, whose utility is testing how to integrate the truck into its management of the grid."

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-05-31/how-the-ford-f-150-can-be-a-backup-home-generator
    I’d take the back feeding onto the grid with a grain of salt. Perhaps your home with it locked out from the grid. I’m no electrician but I’d hate to be a lineman around your place. Reply With Quote
    jazz's Avatar Jul 21, 2022 | 10:13 38
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    So according to Chuck's article, only 11.9% of Canadian Farms are using some form of renewable energy.
    Sounds like the just the guys who got windmills forced onto their lands. Maybe windmills on dugouts, or solar panels for remote weather stations or bin yard cables.

    Just a joke stat if it comes from stats can. Reply With Quote
    Jul 21, 2022 | 10:26 39 I see the denialists and the excessive negative nellies who sometimes call Canada the worst country in the world are back at work. LOL

    If you drive around much, you see a fair number of farms with solar panels. But I guess they are just imaginary panels!

    If they are grid tied which most are, they wont put anything back into the grid if the power goes out for safety reasons.

    And some people are already using their EVs as backup power. As to whether they become an important part of the grid that is too soon to say. But the California utility manager seems to think they will have a role.

    But of course the arm chair "grid analysts" from Alberta aren't so sure.
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jul 21, 2022 at 10:29.
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    jazz's Avatar Jul 21, 2022 | 12:57 40 The EVs are all sitting in the Canadian tire parking lot. Cant even ger themselves charged in 40m. They wont be charging any homes thats for sure.

    Let me see, a $85K Tesla to back up my house, or a $3000 generac fed off clean plentiful storable nat gas.

    Chuck, what marxist university did you go to. LOL Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 21, 2022 | 13:29 41
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    I see the denialists and the excessive negative nellies who sometimes call Canada the worst country in the world are back at work. LOL

    If you drive around much, you see a fair number of farms with solar panels. But I guess they are just imaginary panels!

    If they are grid tied which most are, they wont put anything back into the grid if the power goes out for safety reasons.

    And some people are already using their EVs as backup power. As to whether they become an important part of the grid that is too soon to say. But the California utility manager seems to think they will have a role.

    But of course the arm chair "grid analysts" from Alberta aren't so sure.
    I have a back up generator Chuck2. As part of installing it a large transfer switch was integrated so that it doesn’t backfeed the power lines when in use. Do you think people who are going to power their house will install the proper switching gear to hook up their truck to their house? Conversely grid tie solar installations offer no back up power capability during an outage because that is not the way they are wired in. Continue to dream Chuck2 lol! Reply With Quote
    jazz's Avatar Jul 21, 2022 | 16:22 42
    Quote Originally Posted by Hamloc View Post
    I have a back up generator Chuck2. As part of installing it a large transfer switch was integrated so that it doesn’t backfeed the power lines when in use. Do you think people who are going to power their house will install the proper switching gear to hook up their truck to their house? Conversely grid tie solar installations offer no back up power capability during an outage because that is not the way they are wired in. Continue to dream Chuck2 lol!
    Hybrids have been around for 15 yrs and they can grid connect. I dont see any of those owners selling back to the grid or powering their homes.

    And with the poor battery life in EVs do you really want to waste those hours powering your house. Just depreciating your soon to be worthless vehicle faster. Reply With Quote
    Jul 21, 2022 | 18:16 43
    Quote Originally Posted by WiltonRanch View Post
    I’d take the back feeding onto the grid with a grain of salt. Perhaps your home with it locked out from the grid. I’m no electrician but I’d hate to be a lineman around your place.
    Leftard ,climatard, leaches don’t follow the laws or think they have to pay for roads or power grids , etc. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • jazz's Avatar Jul 21, 2022 | 22:23 44
    Quote Originally Posted by caseih View Post
    Leftard ,climatard, leaches don’t follow the laws or think they have to pay for roads or power grids , etc.
    Any farmer worth his salt and witnessed a prairie hailstorm or plow wind would be the last person to put up a solar array.

    Sounds like these renewable farmers are in BC. Reply With Quote
    Jul 22, 2022 | 07:13 45
    Quote Originally Posted by Hamloc View Post
    I have a back up generator Chuck2. As part of installing it a large transfer switch was integrated so that it doesn’t backfeed the power lines when in use. Do you think people who are going to power their house will install the proper switching gear to hook up their truck to their house? Conversely grid tie solar installations offer no back up power capability during an outage because that is not the way they are wired in. Continue to dream Chuck2 lol!
    Wilton. You don't think the Ford Engineers would have thought of that issue?

    From Bloomberg: Transforming a Lightning into a home generator requires Ford’s 80-amp charging station and a $3,895 home integration system from Sunrun Inc. Installation cost for the Sunrun system varies according to the home and location. The charging station comes with the extended-range version of the Lightning; it’s a $1,310 option for buyers of the standard 230 mile-range version of the pickup.

    If the Lightning is plugged in when a blackout hits, the home automatically begins drawing electricity from the battery. When power is restored, the system disconnects and then resumes charging the vehicle. Ford says the Lightning can fully power an average home for roughly three days.

    The system will be set up to switch on and off the grid just like automatic backup generators which go on and off when the powers goes out and back on again. It already exists and has been around for decades.

    The manual transfer switch option works for those of us who have manual on and off generators.

    If you shut of the main breaker switch at the pole and meter into your yard you can also run a generator and power your farm. But that is not recommended and prone to human error.

    It is possible to set up a grid tied solar system to provide backup power but it is expensive. I asked an engineer about it and using a generator wont work with solar because the panels will put to much power into the generator and blow it up.

    The safest option is to shut off the grid supply to your solar panels and then run your backup generator with a transfer switch.
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jul 22, 2022 at 07:19.
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    Jul 22, 2022 | 07:26 46
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    Any farmer worth his salt and witnessed a prairie hailstorm or plow wind would be the last person to put up a solar array.

    Sounds like these renewable farmers are in BC.
    But you have windows in your house, vulnerable crops in your fields and hail doesn't affect them too? LOL

    Solar panels are tougher than most windows. And if the worst happens there is insurance.

    Jazz your arguments are lame. Reply With Quote
    jazz's Avatar Jul 22, 2022 | 07:49 47
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    But you have windows in your house, vulnerable crops in your fields and hail doesn't affect them too? LOL

    Solar panels are tougher than most windows. And if the worst happens there is insurance.

    Jazz your arguments are lame.
    My arguments are lame? Hell you are the one thinking solar and wind can power our society when every stat shows it’s not possible.

    Quoting Reuters or Bloomberg isn’t science.

    The Europeans are finding that out right now. Starting old coal plants. Your EV climate fairy take will die. It’s caused rampant inflation and hurt people now and that will be its down fall.

    All the esg companies are quietly buying oil stocks.

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    Last edited by jazz; Jul 22, 2022 at 09:03.
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    Jul 23, 2022 | 07:32 48 I never said wind and solar are going to replace all the fossil sources of energy.

    But renewables already provide a lot of electricity in many countries.

    "In 2021, about 4,116 billion kilowatthours (kWh) (or about 4.12 trillion kWh) of electricity were generated at utility-scale electricity generation facilities in the United States.1 About 61% of this electricity generation was from fossil fuels—coal, natural gas, petroleum, and other gases. About 19% was from nuclear energy, and about 20% was from renewable energy sources.

    The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that an additional 49 billion kWh of electricity generation was from small-scale solar photovoltaic systems in 2021."

    https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=427&t=3

    And I stand by my statement that many of your arguments are lame!

    Did you board up your windows and give up farming because of the hail risk just like you said solar wasn't viable because of hail? LOL Reply With Quote
    Jul 24, 2022 | 08:10 49 https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/energy-explained/how-much-uks-energy-renewable

    Breaking records: The UK’s renewable energy in numbers

    2020 was the UK’s highest year on record for renewable generation so far, and we’ve been breaking records for renewables ever since.

    Zero-carbon power in Britain’s electricity mix has grown from less than 20% in 2010 to nearly 50% in 2021. In contrast, power provided from fossil fuels was down to roughly 35% in 2021 compared with over 75% in 2010.

    In 2020 renewables accounted for more than 43.1% of the UK's total electricity generated, at 312 terawatt hours (TWh). This outstripped fossil fuels over the course of a year, for the first time in the nation’s history.

    2020 also saw UK have its longest run of coal-free power, with a total of 68 days between 10 April and 16 June. This is the longest coal-free period since the industrial revolution, which began in the mid-1700s!

    Zero-carbon generation overtook fossil fuel consumption in 11 months of the year in 2021.

    2021 was the second highest year for renewable generation on record, after 2020.

    On 5 April 2021, the UK achieved its lowest ever carbon intensity at 39 grams of CO2 per kWh, due to reduced use of fossil fuels for electricity generation. This was made possible by a 60% increase in the rate of renewable capacity installed in 2021 (compared to 2020).

    25 May 2022 holds the record for the maximum amount of wind power generation, at 19.9 GW. Reply With Quote
    Jul 24, 2022 | 20:07 50

    They need something to reliably run the grid for people to charge their EV’s lol Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Jul 25, 2022 | 21:09 51
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/energy-explained/how-much-uks-energy-renewable

    Breaking records: The UK’s renewable energy in numbers

    2020 was the UK’s highest year on record for renewable generation so far, and we’ve been breaking records for renewables ever since.

    Zero-carbon power in Britain’s electricity mix has grown from less than 20% in 2010 to nearly 50% in 2021. In contrast, power provided from fossil fuels was down to roughly 35% in 2021 compared with over 75% in 2010.

    In 2020 renewables accounted for more than 43.1% of the UK's total electricity generated, at 312 terawatt hours (TWh). This outstripped fossil fuels over the course of a year, for the first time in the nation’s history.

    2020 also saw UK have its longest run of coal-free power, with a total of 68 days between 10 April and 16 June. This is the longest coal-free period since the industrial revolution, which began in the mid-1700s!

    Zero-carbon generation overtook fossil fuel consumption in 11 months of the year in 2021.

    2021 was the second highest year for renewable generation on record, after 2020.

    On 5 April 2021, the UK achieved its lowest ever carbon intensity at 39 grams of CO2 per kWh, due to reduced use of fossil fuels for electricity generation. This was made possible by a 60% increase in the rate of renewable capacity installed in 2021 (compared to 2020).

    25 May 2022 holds the record for the maximum amount of wind power generation, at 19.9 GW.
    you need to change channels and WTF up Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 25, 2022 | 22:23 52
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/energy-explained/how-much-uks-energy-renewable

    Breaking records: The UK’s renewable energy in numbers

    2020 was the UK’s highest year on record for renewable generation so far, and we’ve been breaking records for renewables ever since.

    Zero-carbon power in Britain’s electricity mix has grown from less than 20% in 2010 to nearly 50% in 2021. In contrast, power provided from fossil fuels was down to roughly 35% in 2021 compared with over 75% in 2010.

    In 2020 renewables accounted for more than 43.1% of the UK's total electricity generated, at 312 terawatt hours (TWh). This outstripped fossil fuels over the course of a year, for the first time in the nation’s history.

    2020 also saw UK have its longest run of coal-free power, with a total of 68 days between 10 April and 16 June. This is the longest coal-free period since the industrial revolution, which began in the mid-1700s!

    Zero-carbon generation overtook fossil fuel consumption in 11 months of the year in 2021.

    2021 was the second highest year for renewable generation on record, after 2020.

    On 5 April 2021, the UK achieved its lowest ever carbon intensity at 39 grams of CO2 per kWh, due to reduced use of fossil fuels for electricity generation. This was made possible by a 60% increase in the rate of renewable capacity installed in 2021 (compared to 2020).

    25 May 2022 holds the record for the maximum amount of wind power generation, at 19.9 GW.
    And they accomplished all that, at the same time as their electric bills went up by many many multiples, and a once stable grid now regularly has black outs and restrictions and imports. Probably just coincidence, after all, Chuck keeps posting how wind and solar are now by far the cheapest generation sources.

    How could all that free energy possibly cause such high energy bills? 1 in 3 households now in energy poverty.

    Energy bills are set to soar weeks later when a price cap is raised by more than 60%, taking the increase this year to about 150%.

    For many, it will be too much to handle, leaving them unable to power, or heat, their homes. According to charity National Energy Action, one in three households — more than 8 million — are expected to be pushed into fuel poverty.
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  • Jul 26, 2022 | 07:23 53 Simple question Chuck2, if renewable energy is so cheap to generate why is it so expensive to buy?! Reply With Quote
    Jul 26, 2022 | 07:30 54 Generation costs are only a portion of the costs to deliver electricity through the grid.

    And Solar and wind generation costs are some of the cheapest sources of electricity generation in many parts of the world.

    There are some additional costs for adding intermittent renewables into the grid system.

    And costs for all the other things that are needed to deliver electricity to millions of customers continue to rise.

    Fossil fuel generation costs are rising also because fossil fuel prices are high.
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jul 26, 2022 at 07:47.
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    Jul 26, 2022 | 07:40 55 https://irena.org/newsroom/pressreleases/2022/Jul/Renewable-Power-Remains-Cost-Competitive-amid-Fossil-Fuel-Crisis

    Renewable Power Remains Cost-Competitive amid Fossil Fuel Crisis

    13 July 2022| Press Release

    New IRENA report shows almost two-thirds of renewable power added in 2021 had lower costs than the cheapest coal-fired options in G20 countries.

    Abu Dhabi, UAE, 13 July 2022 – Costs for renewables continued to fall in 2021 as supply chain challenges and rising commodity prices have yet to show their full impact on project costs. The cost of electricity from onshore wind fell by 15%, offshore wind by 13% and solar PV by 13% compared to 2020.

    Renewable Power Generation Costs in 2021, published by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) today, shows that almost two-thirds or 163 gigawatts (GW) of newly installed renewable power in 2021 had lower costs than the world’s cheapest coal-fired option in the G20. IRENA estimates that, given the current high fossil fuel prices, the renewable power added in 2021 saves around USD 55 billion from global energy generation costs in 2022.

    IRENA’s new report confirms the critical role that cost-competitive renewables play in addressing today’s energy and climate emergencies by accelerating the transition in line with the 1.5°C warming limit and the Paris Agreement goals. Solar and wind energy, with their relatively short project lead times, represent vital planks in countries’ efforts to swiftly reduce, and eventually phase out, fossil fuels and limit the macroeconomic damages they cause in pursuit of net zero.

    “Renewables are by far the cheapest form of power today,” Francesco La Camera, Director-General of IRENA said. “2022 is a stark example of just how economically viable new renewable power generation has become. Renewable power frees economies from volatile fossil fuel prices and imports, curbs energy costs and enhances market resilience – even more so if today’s energy crunch continues.”

    “While a temporary crisis response might be necessary in the current situation, excuses to soften climate goals will not hold mid-to-long-term. Today’s situation is a devastating reminder that renewables and energy saving are the future. With the COP27 in Egypt and COP28 in the UAE ahead, renewables provide governments with affordable energy to align with net zero and turn their climate promises into concrete action with real benefits for people on the ground,” he added.

    Investments in renewables continue to pay huge dividends in 2022, as highlighted by IRENA’s costs data. In non-OECD countries, the 109 GW of renewable energy additions in 2021 that cost less than the cheapest new fossil fuel-fired option will reduce costs by at least USD 5.7 billion annually for the next 25-30 years.

    High coal and fossil gas prices in 2021 and 2022 will also profoundly deteriorate the competitiveness of fossil fuels and make solar and wind even more attractive. With an unprecedented surge in European fossil gas prices for example, new fossil gas generation in Europe will increasingly become uneconomic over its lifetime, increasing the risk of stranded assets.

    The European example shows that fuel and CO2 costs for existing gas plants might average four to six times more in 2022 than the lifetime cost of new solar PV and onshore wind commissioned in 2021. Between January and May 2022, the generation of solar and wind power may have saved Europe fossil fuel imports in the magnitude of no less than USD 50 billion, predominantly fossil gas.

    As to supply chains, IRENA’s data suggests that not all materials cost increases have been passed through into equipment prices and project costs yet. If material costs remain elevated, the price pressures in 2022 will be more pronounced. Increases might however be dwarfed by the overall gains of cost-competitive renewables in comparison to higher fossil fuel prices.

    Read the full report Renewable Power Generation Costs in 2021. Reply With Quote
    Jul 26, 2022 | 13:14 56 there is no hope Reply With Quote

  • Jul 26, 2022 | 19:13 57 The actual intent of “reducing” fossil fuel use is having adverse effects. Iran says thank you …
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  • Partners's Avatar Jul 26, 2022 | 20:09 58 Reply With Quote
    fjlip's Avatar Jul 26, 2022 | 20:51 59 GRRR, must resist the EVIL from the East!

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    Jul 27, 2022 | 06:32 60 Flipper you should stick to "explaining" the various bizarre causes of homosexuality. that seems to be your strength since you posted that it's caused by parasites. LOL Reply With Quote