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Feb 23, 2021 | 22:03 1 It appears the other forum has gone to the Dodo birds...........

This is what I was up to today. Just supplementing the cows as they finish up the corn. Just curious how everyone is making good use of this beautiful weather we have? It’s been a little above freezing the last few days and looks to stay that way for a while.

My sidekick is enjoying it too. Ironically I spend more of my awake hours with him than anyone else.

Besides finding a bred heifer turtled and dead, blowing a rad hose on the bale truck, dead batteries and a failed block heater on a tractor, and a bunch of yearlings that escaped by climbing over a low fence it went fantastic............

At least it’s not 40 below. Anyone calving yet? 🍀 Reply With Quote

  • Feb 25, 2021 | 04:39 2
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post
    It appears the other forum has gone to the Dodo birds...........

    This is what I was up to today. Just supplementing the cows as they finish up the corn. Just curious how everyone is making good use of this beautiful weather we have? It’s been a little above freezing the last few days and looks to stay that way for a while.

    My sidekick is enjoying it too. Ironically I spend more of my awake hours with him than anyone else.

    Besides finding a bred heifer turtled and dead, blowing a rad hose on the bale truck, dead batteries and a failed block heater on a tractor, and a bunch of yearlings that escaped by climbing over a low fence it went fantastic............

    At least it’s not 40 below. Anyone calving yet? 🍀
    You won't get me to admit that BL don't M. Reply With Quote
    Feb 25, 2021 | 17:25 3
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post
    It appears the other forum has gone to the Dodo birds...........

    This is what I was up to today. Just supplementing the cows as they finish up the corn. Just curious how everyone is making good use of this beautiful weather we have? It’s been a little above freezing the last few days and looks to stay that way for a while.

    My sidekick is enjoying it too. Ironically I spend more of my awake hours with him than anyone else.

    Besides finding a bred heifer turtled and dead, blowing a rad hose on the bale truck, dead batteries and a failed block heater on a tractor, and a bunch of yearlings that escaped by climbing over a low fence it went fantastic............

    At least it’s not 40 below. Anyone calving yet? 🍀
    Not calving until April. Too old for the February calving. Good luck to those of you who are.

    Do you know about the recovery position for compromised newborn calves?

    https://www.tsln.com/news/tips-for-s...lthier-calves/ Reply With Quote
    Feb 26, 2021 | 09:44 4
    Quote Originally Posted by checking View Post
    You won't get me to admit that BL don't M.
    I like our little cows and how they handle whatever gets thrown at them by us and Ma Nature. I think there’s nothing much left of the corn for them but they hardly come to see you when you drop a load of nice grass bales for them. Must be happy.

    Colour is irrelevant in my eyes but I think they look sharp😎 Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Feb 26, 2021 | 09:55 5 Cows smashed the cold snap. Didn’t even phase them at all. Other than they seemed to drink like elephants right when water was getting to be a pain!

    Now that it’s warmed up it’s like they’ve fallen off the edge. It always amazes me how much they eat when it’s cold and then how much they don’t when it warms up. They are not cleaning up their bales with any enthusiasm this week Lol

    They’ve been around the side of the house for a bit now, working on fertilizing the front yard. I like being able to peak out the front window and see them. They follow a similar schedule to me and don’t really get out of bed very early.


    I have a fairly spread out calving block considering there’s only about 8 to calve but I don’t mind. Spreads out the cost of buying fosters! First to drop is going to be the Simmental on the far left. Should go in the next couple weeks. Then at least 2 of the 3 heifers are end of March. Don’t know when the 3rd is due. Cows were at a different pasture so no wooing was seen to know their dates but they should be March/April as well. Reply With Quote
    Feb 26, 2021 | 12:40 6 Cattle tend to really tank up on food BEFORE the cold weather gets here. A good indicator that it's coming. Reply With Quote
    Feb 26, 2021 | 17:19 7
    Quote Originally Posted by littledoggie View Post
    Not calving until April. Too old for the February calving. Good luck to those of you who are.

    Do you know about the recovery position for compromised newborn calves?

    https://www.tsln.com/news/tips-for-s...lthier-calves/
    Never heard of that before. We occasionally hang them up if they were pulled and not breathing great. Always tickled their noses and had fluid come out but never heard that it could be stomach fluid.............

    Got some free edumacation today.

    Ma Nature is pretty smart and not many wild creatures around here are born in snowdrifts. I try to follow her lead when possible. Plus the longer days in a couple months mean fewer night checks😉 Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Feb 26, 2021 | 17:48 8 Hanging them compresses their lungs.

    Makes sense when you stop and think about it. We all know that older animals don’t do well with their head down and organs on their lungs. Just never really think about it when all you’ve known is hanging them on the gate.

    One of those extreme Oh duh moments when I first seen the recovery position 😂 Reply With Quote
    Feb 26, 2021 | 18:29 9
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Hanging them compresses their lungs.

    Makes sense when you stop and think about it. We all know that older animals don’t do well with their head down and organs on their lungs. Just never really think about it when all you’ve known is hanging them on the gate.

    One of those extreme Oh duh moments when I first seen the recovery position 😂
    Always humbling to know that we have been doing something wrong forever. Lots of good info in the article.

    Our long time vet says he has those kind of moment regularly, when he learns that what he was taught in vet school, and has been doing for years, is completely wrong.

    Knowledge progresses. Imagine the weight on the conciense of the Doctors who used to kill so many birthing mothers by contaminating them with dirty hands from the mortuary, when it was eventually accepted. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • GDR
    Feb 27, 2021 | 00:22 10 Pretty cool picture of your cows Woodland, that's a lot of bunks.

    Hot and heavy lambing here, havent got much sleep last few days, all seem to wait till nighttime this year. Should be down to just stragglers in a few days. Then I'm on whelping duty, my helper is due for a batch of pups in 10 days. Cows start mid March. Baby central here for 3 months as usual.

    That calving article, basically what we do here for the most part, been sitting babies up like that for a long time, then rub them on either side of their spine, or sometimes "pump" their back leg towards their body, seems to work well. Dont generally have much issues with calving, lambing presents more problems. Always like when the vet suggests to do a c section early. Havent needed one for 20 yrs myself but a friend did one a couple years ago, bill was over $1200 with mileage, after hour charges etc. Vets have lost touch with reality of livestock farming and have pretty well become equine and small animal vets. Still know a couple good ones, they just aren't close enough to me when you need them.

    Was gonna add some lambing pictures but Agriville keeps saying there is an error???
    Last edited by GDR; Feb 27, 2021 at 02:55.
    Reply With Quote
    Feb 27, 2021 | 06:59 11
    Quote Originally Posted by littledoggie View Post
    Cattle tend to really tank up on food BEFORE the cold weather gets here. A good indicator that it's coming.
    Interesting. I always notice the water springs around here start running more a couple days before it warms up. Must be the pressure change driving these changes??? Reply With Quote
    Feb 27, 2021 | 07:34 12
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Cows smashed the cold snap. Didn’t even phase them at all. Other than they seemed to drink like elephants right when water was getting to be a pain!

    Now that it’s warmed up it’s like they’ve fallen off the edge. It always amazes me how much they eat when it’s cold and then how much they don’t when it warms up. They are not cleaning up their bales with any enthusiasm this week Lol

    They’ve been around the side of the house for a bit now, working on fertilizing the front yard. I like being able to peak out the front window and see them. They follow a similar schedule to me and don’t really get out of bed very early.


    I have a fairly spread out calving block considering there’s only about 8 to calve but I don’t mind. Spreads out the cost of buying fosters! First to drop is going to be the Simmental on the far left. Should go in the next couple weeks. Then at least 2 of the 3 heifers are end of March. Don’t know when the 3rd is due. Cows were at a different pasture so no wooing was seen to know their dates but they should be March/April as well.
    I know my friend likes calving now so the bulls can start breeding in the corrals. That way they can keep track of which bull gets which cow on what day. I suggested a DNA test might save time but they are kinda resistant to change. As long as our cows get bred within three cycles I’m happy. What are foster calves worth these days?

    It really seems like the odds are stacked against us at keeping water flowing at -30. The axe is my weapon of choice to open up the waterers.

    The way our yard is setup if I see cows out the window when I wake up I know there’s a open gate or fence to fix.


    Fun times😎 Reply With Quote
    Feb 27, 2021 | 08:36 13
    Quote Originally Posted by GDR View Post
    Pretty cool picture of your cows Woodland, that's a lot of bunks.

    Hot and heavy lambing here, havent got much sleep last few days, all seem to wait till nighttime this year. Should be down to just stragglers in a few days. Then I'm on whelping duty, my helper is due for a batch of pups in 10 days. Cows start mid March. Baby central here for 3 months as usual.

    That calving article, basically what we do here for the most part, been sitting babies up like that for a long time, then rub them on either side of their spine, or sometimes "pump" their back leg towards their body, seems to work well. Dont generally have much issues with calving, lambing presents more problems. Always like when the vet suggests to do a c section early. Havent needed one for 20 yrs myself but a friend did one a couple years ago, bill was over $1200 with mileage, after hour charges etc. Vets have lost touch with reality of livestock farming and have pretty well become equine and small animal vets. Still know a couple good ones, they just aren't close enough to me when you need them.

    Was gonna add some lambing pictures but Agriville keeps saying there is an error???
    Been building more bunks lately as there seems to be more cows here all the time. Not sure if that’s a good thing or not? 😉

    The vets have priced themselves out of our place as well. Closest one is 50 km away. We get them to semen test in June and ultrasound the bred heifers in December. We get two different vets out so that opens two different doors to get medicine at. YouTube on the phone at the maternity pen is an amazing resource.

    What kind of issues do lambs run into? Haven’t been around many of them as they’re pretty scarce around here.

    Pictures are always great. Please try again😎 Reply With Quote
    Feb 28, 2021 | 15:06 14 I always forget there are these other forums. Seems more farming info on this one. Don’t want to hijack, but being as sheep are basically a little cow, I’m here to learn more. And I appreciate the pics. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Blaithin's Avatar Mar 1, 2021 | 13:48 15
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post
    I know my friend likes calving now so the bulls can start breeding in the corrals. That way they can keep track of which bull gets which cow on what day. I suggested a DNA test might save time but they are kinda resistant to change. As long as our cows get bred within three cycles I’m happy. What are foster calves worth these days?

    It really seems like the odds are stacked against us at keeping water flowing at -30. The axe is my weapon of choice to open up the waterers.

    The way our yard is setup if I see cows out the window when I wake up I know there’s a open gate or fence to fix.


    Fun times😎
    400-500 has been the normal for fosters the last few years. Some want higher, I just be patient for others to appear. Or can go to the auction and take a chance on a calf there. Also got a couple dairies I’m in touch with that do Beef bulls on the cows so I can get them for a little less if I need a bunch of calves in a short time span. Currently trying to have a cow need a calf at the same time a dairy has a Belgian Blue cross calf available as I’m interested in seeing how that cross does.

    My waterer is alright. Bigger trough with a floating de icer but at past -30s it can’t keep the whole top open. The hole gradually gets smaller and smaller 😂

    Since my bull is with the cows year round I could have calves anytime (like the surprise Christmas calf...) but usually they’re close enough to home that I can see some sort of action going on to know when they’re due to start calving. They do seem to have mostly congregated into April so I just leave them to their own thing the last few years. The heifers it’s nice to know when they’re due though, just because they’re heifers!






    GDR does feeding sheep in the evening have the same effect as feeding cattle in the evening; mostly day time births, less night time ones? I thought I read somewhere it does. Might be something to try next time if you aren’t already doing it, just to help nights not be so busy! Reply With Quote
    Mar 1, 2021 | 14:59 16
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    400-500 has been the normal for fosters the last few years. Some want higher, I just be patient for others to appear. Or can go to the auction and take a chance on a calf there. Also got a couple dairies I’m in touch with that do Beef bulls on the cows so I can get them for a little less if I need a bunch of calves in a short time span. Currently trying to have a cow need a calf at the same time a dairy has a Belgian Blue cross calf available as I’m interested in seeing how that cross does.

    My waterer is alright. Bigger trough with a floating de icer but at past -30s it can’t keep the whole top open. The hole gradually gets smaller and smaller 😂

    Since my bull is with the cows year round I could have calves anytime (like the surprise Christmas calf...) but usually they’re close enough to home that I can see some sort of action going on to know when they’re due to start calving. They do seem to have mostly congregated into April so I just leave them to their own thing the last few years. The heifers it’s nice to know when they’re due though, just because they’re heifers!






    GDR does feeding sheep in the evening have the same effect as feeding cattle in the evening; mostly day time births, less night time ones? I thought I read somewhere it does. Might be something to try next time if you aren’t already doing it, just to help nights not be so busy!
    We tried the evening feeding trick and it helps as long as the tractor doesn’t die, wagon tires go flat, cows get out............ next thing you know it’s midnight and nobody is happy. Neither the cows or us. Went back to feeding and bedding first thing in the morning after a few bad nights brought on by my “amazing” luck😉 Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • GDR
    Mar 1, 2021 | 21:11 17
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post


    GDR does feeding sheep in the evening have the same effect as feeding cattle in the evening; mostly day time births, less night time ones? I thought I read somewhere it does. Might be something to try next time if you aren’t already doing it, just to help nights not be so busy!
    When I figure it out I will let you know, lol! For years the majority typically lambed an hour before feeding time. So I generally feed just before lunch time planning on having morning lambs. This year I would guess 75% lambed between midnight and 6am, I check often and if I see someone starting I will stay up till they are done so makes for some long nights. My wife was rubbing it in last week that my feeding program isn't working out too well. I check my last night check at 630am and then go to bed for a couple hours and she checks until I get up to do chores. Just down to stragglers now but am at 194% live lambs, have done pretty well but was sure trying to hit 200%. Have only done that once.

    I've tried feeding cows later and think it helps but I get impatient and want to get chores done and move on with my day, must have a bit OCD in me cause its sure hard to change things up.

    Agriville still doesnt like my pictures this week off my phone, anyone else having trouble? Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Mar 1, 2021 | 21:18 18

    Nope, mine seem to be working. But I have to select the large size, if I leave it on “Actual Size” I get an error. Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Mar 1, 2021 | 21:45 19
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post

    What kind of issues do lambs run into? Haven’t been around many of them as they’re pretty scarce around here.
    All the same issues as cows just more of them. Presentation this year has been good but some years seem to have lots of issues. If they would all just have twins it would be better for us and them. Singles get too big and triplets can be a delivery issue at times and not too many ewes have enough milk to properly feed 3 anyhow. I did graft one triplet on a ewe that lost one of her twins this year and went really well but often it's a disaster as they are much more determined than a cow to not foster another baby. Last year I had 2 I tried to foster, ended up having to leave both ewes in a stantion for 6 weeks by which time I just weaned the lambs, they would kick, lay down, jump whatever they could to stop the wrong lamb from drinking, hard to believe they knew which one because they couldn't turn around to smell them but they knew. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Mar 2, 2021 | 07:41 20 We like the later in the day feeding strategy for day time calving. We start the late afternoon feeding a month or so before calving is expected to start - which would be about 2 weeks before our due date (we have red angus) We feed everyday and all hay is mostly cleaned up by feeding time. Cows that don't come to feed are suspect for calving during the night, but they usually calve in the wee hours of the morning. Reply With Quote
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  • Blaithin's Avatar Mar 2, 2021 | 09:23 21 Feeding in the afternoon/evening is also a good strategy to help them stay warm during winter nights. Understandable that it’s not some people’s preference of time to feed though.

    Does anyone else here just have free feed available? Or even straight bale grazing/swath grazing/corn grazing with no supplemental feed taken to them? Since I have a tiny herd they just have bales available full time, as you can see. Although they do get a few sleds of other hay sometimes, in the afternoon, but I can’t control their feeding time to help try and keep them warmer in the coldest part of the day. Somehow they swapped themselves to it anyway. Curious if others noticed that trend?

    In the cold snap the entire herd would go to bed pretty much at sunset. 6:30-7:00 they’d move into the corrals, have a big drink (so this is when I needed to fill the trough up last), and then they would bed down. They would not get out of bed until around 11-12 the next day! They might be up and drinking but they’d be suntanning and cudding and back laying down. Then midday they’d move to the bales to eat. They fuelled themselves with digestion heat for those cold -50 nights. Now that it’s warmed out they’re not nearly so scheduled. There’s a couple up and eating at 8, a few just sleeping nearby, a few over on the bedding pack.... It was probably just the warmest part of the days for them to go eat which is why their schedules tightened up, but if I had been limit feeding them in the AM they would have got up to eat no matter what when obviously it’s not their preference when left alone.

    Cant say I’ve ever noticed the ones close to calving choosing to eat later in the day though. I’ll have to pay attention and see. I don’t have high expectations they would though! Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Mar 3, 2021 | 21:47 22 Screenshots of pictures will upload but not right from the gallery, maybe file size too big??
    Reply With Quote

  • Mar 3, 2021 | 23:30 23
    Quote Originally Posted by GDR View Post
    Screenshots of pictures will upload but not right from the gallery, maybe file size too big??
    I better not show those pics to my kids or my daughter will be pestering me steady to get a flock........😉

    Definitely cute👍
    And the fact your panels are very easily moved by hand is a bonus compared to the moo moos.

    Crazy question...... Do you pasture your ewes? A guy a few miles over runs 700 or so but they live year round in a small field getting fed bales. He claims he has to deworm them monthly otherwise. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • GDR
    Mar 4, 2021 | 11:25 24
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post
    I better not show those pics to my kids or my daughter will be pestering me steady to get a flock........😉

    Definitely cute👍
    And the fact your panels are very easily moved by hand is a bonus compared to the moo moos.

    Crazy question...... Do you pasture your ewes? A guy a few miles over runs 700 or so but they live year round in a small field getting fed bales. He claims he has to deworm them monthly otherwise.
    I do pasture the ewes, lambs get fed out in the corral, mostly gone by mid summer. Flock in the corral all winter. If I were to run a large flock I would keep them out of confinement year round. Would have to move though which is most of the reason I dont have a big flock. We built on the edge of a coulee with a creek in the bottom on a mostly bush quarter. Too many places for coyotes to hide.

    Sheep graze a bit different than cattle, have heard lots of guys say when you run them together the stocking rates for each dont really decline. They for sure eat grass but often prefer weeds and woody type plants the cows don't. They control any young growth of trees or shrubs and even some big trees they will peel the bark and eventually kill them.

    There are a few barns around where the sheep see very little daylight, managed intensively like a chicken barn and are able to continuously lamb the ewes.

    As for your neighbours comments doesnt make a bunch of sense to me. We deworm only once per year and honestly don't ever see a difference in the sheep or evidence in the manure.

    C'mon woodland, get that little girl a nice bottle lamb! You will have that farm converted in no time! Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Mar 6, 2021 | 13:16 25 GDR. Those look like north country Cheviot influence at least? If we were doing wool they were the breed we were looking at closely. Reply With Quote
    Mar 6, 2021 | 18:13 26 Some one mentioned ultra sounding.

    Missus bought a machine for scanning horses.

    Paid for it in one year.

    Screen and probe shows foetus well. Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Mar 6, 2021 | 21:18 27
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    GDR. Those look like north country Cheviot influence at least? If we were doing wool they were the breed we were looking at closely.
    yes, all purebred papered ewes. Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Mar 6, 2021 | 21:20 28
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    Some one mentioned ultra sounding.

    Missus bought a machine for scanning horses.

    Paid for it in one year.

    Screen and probe shows foetus well.
    Do you do the ewes with it? Getting more common all the time, lots of cows being preg checked that way now too. Reply With Quote
    Mar 12, 2021 | 09:38 29
    Quote Originally Posted by GDR View Post
    I do pasture the ewes, lambs get fed out in the corral, mostly gone by mid summer. Flock in the corral all winter. If I were to run a large flock I would keep them out of confinement year round. Would have to move though which is most of the reason I dont have a big flock. We built on the edge of a coulee with a creek in the bottom on a mostly bush quarter. Too many places for coyotes to hide.

    Sheep graze a bit different than cattle, have heard lots of guys say when you run them together the stocking rates for each dont really decline. They for sure eat grass but often prefer weeds and woody type plants the cows don't. They control any young growth of trees or shrubs and even some big trees they will peel the bark and eventually kill them.

    There are a few barns around where the sheep see very little daylight, managed intensively like a chicken barn and are able to continuously lamb the ewes.

    As for your neighbours comments doesnt make a bunch of sense to me. We deworm only once per year and honestly don't ever see a difference in the sheep or evidence in the manure.

    C'mon woodland, get that little girl a nice bottle lamb! You will have that farm converted in no time!
    Well............... all the fence we’ve done the last few years has been page wire but that has been to keep the calves in.😉

    Been trying to simplify things here instead of complicating them here. She would be all over them cute little fluffy lambs though. I’ve told her she can get a horse/pony once she is able to take care of it by herself. She just turned eight last month so that day is coming up quick........😎

    Always nice to see how everyone here does things different with the same end result of producing a delicious edible protein. Reply With Quote
    Mar 12, 2021 | 18:01 30 Just reading market report beef this week

    Blacks with calves at foot depending on age of mother around the $27 to $2900

    Bear in mind herd rebuild after years of drought in some areas Reply With Quote