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South america has problems just a heads up.

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SASKFARMER's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 07:53 1 Anyone who farmed in the mud years knows rain doesn't make grain and if your a country like Brazil where the crop is two to three weeks late and now it's starting to really rain like an inch or two every morning you have serious problems starting.

Some states are 50% damage on the soy crop due to sprouting and mud.

The bigger problem is corn usually goes in after the beans and guess what we all know how much fun it is to seed into the mud.

Mud is a dud.

So maybe when the market experts are talking a big blow upcoming in March on prices just a little heads up they know the situation down south and supply will be limited for quality.

So the last in your bins has a worth. Reply With Quote
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  • SASKFARMER's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 07:55 2 Rain in the tropics and crops hm

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    Feb 22, 2021 | 07:59 3 Sprouting and pods dropped to the ground....record or large crop is questionable.... Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 22, 2021 | 08:01 4 Yes rain, sprouting and delayed corn planting is starting to make the news, and social media.

    When beans sprout is there a impact on oil crush yield or quality? Reply With Quote
    SASKFARMER's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 08:08 5 We have to remember they are a topical country not like us every day is getting colder. They are 70 above in the winter so early August rain and heat and we have hairs growing out of Barley in less than three days in CAnada.

    I am getting reports of 1 to 2 inches a night and it's heavy rain. Watched a guy trying to seed in the mud as we did in mud years pulling a tractor with a long rope by another tractor. Reply With Quote
    Feb 22, 2021 | 08:21 6 The Canadian seed trade Assn. Should be falling all over this, selling short growing season varieties.

    If it’s too wet it’s too wet. They will have to wait.

    Any way this is all market bullish. We need bullish and strong markets up to May or June to make a somewhat educated - best guess to our own production volumes and crop size. Then forward sales and contracting might make sense, until then we are in a major drought, and the odds are against a normal size crop, regardless of what anyone says. Reply With Quote

  • Feb 22, 2021 | 08:26 7 Canola $20? Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 22, 2021 | 08:26 8 Any word on what the winter weather in Texas and southern States has done to crops? Reply With Quote
    Feb 22, 2021 | 08:45 9 If your thinking ( or hoping) $20 canola you should be saying $24.
    Then there’s room to negotiate, that’s what sales are, right? Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 22, 2021 | 08:47 10 It could go to 30 bucks a bushel but there would be few farmers getting wealthy....

    Most is probably sold or committed....like 95 plus percent from farmers.... Reply With Quote
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  • jazz's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 09:22 11 Who knows what to believe. This was on the wires a couple days ago.




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    SASKFARMER's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 11:21 12 Certain areas are later this year and with rain every night and some days it does one thing causes grain to sprout. Reply With Quote
    Feb 22, 2021 | 11:34 13
    Quote Originally Posted by SASKFARMER View Post
    Certain areas are later this year and with rain every night and some days it does one thing causes grain to sprout.
    How big is the area in question? I know the years we couldn’t seed anything it wasn’t a very big area overall, and it didn’t affect prices squat. Is it a million acres or seven million? Reply With Quote
    Feb 22, 2021 | 11:45 14 Brazil is huge with many climatic regions. So is Argentina. FWIW as much as we think we know about these places we know fathomingly nothing. Their influence on world affairs is next to nil; they do their own thing and stay out. Reply With Quote
    Feb 22, 2021 | 12:19 15
    Quote Originally Posted by WiltonRanch View Post
    Brazil is huge with many climatic regions. So is Argentina. FWIW as much as we think we know about these places we know fathomingly nothing. Their influence on world affairs is next to nil; they do their own thing and stay out.
    Like kinda huge acreages, too.

    At :26 of the video, those are either dinky toy sprayers or that patch of soys is rather large or there wouldn't be need for 3 of them?

    As in one corn field spreading out over 16,500 acres, according to Farm Progress online. Reply With Quote
    Feb 22, 2021 | 12:25 16 World Weather, it’s getting interesting for food producers. Think the world will finally realize the value of food and reward the primary producer? 🚀 Reply With Quote
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  • SASKFARMER's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 12:56 17





    Your correct it’s just a small area effected Reply With Quote
    jazz's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 14:46 18 This sounds like canadian canola experts in August 2020 all over again. It dry, its wet, big crop, smaller crop.

    https://www.agriculture.com/weather/news/dry-weather-concerns-extend-from-south-america-into-north-america

    https://www.agriculture.com/markets/newswire/rains-in-argentina-boost-expectations-for-good-soy-corn-crops Reply With Quote
    fjlip's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 14:59 19 For 6 months "THEY" bought low, now selling HIGH! The right news works for those that spin it. Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 22, 2021 | 18:28 20
    Quote Originally Posted by sumdumguy View Post
    World Weather, it’s getting interesting for food producers. Think the world will finally realize the value of food and reward the primary producer? 🚀
    And China is hoarding all the grain, could be some hungry countries next year Reply With Quote
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  • SASKFARMER's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 22:24 21 They are getting desperate because time is running out to seed the next crop after beans harvesting at 30 moisture. Not fun Reply With Quote