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Feb 21, 2021 | 08:29 1 Bin doing some metal work on older trailers for a farm I drive truck for , don't want to be dribbling $16 canola on our silk smooth #16 hyway. Just wonder ( along with trailer owner ) what brand or direction guys are going as far as replacement steel or aluminum ?

Seams to be both types on road these days Reply With Quote
Feb 21, 2021 | 08:32 2 Notice lots of everything hauling to the crushers in Yorkton, but have really seen a resurgence of Doepker Steel Superbs, tons of them on the road and a lot more truck wash optons in the area should help keep the paint decent. Reply With Quote
Feb 21, 2021 | 08:48 3 These load kings have been good but are about 1500kgs heavier than guys ahead of me in the lineups. We know they can't last forever. Reply With Quote
Feb 21, 2021 | 09:03 4 Yes the Doepker steel and aluminum are the lightest trailers available right now. I personally think they are the best.
I run the Legacy’s now and haul over 45T (at 63,500). I have small rock marks at the rear of both the lead and pup on the sides. This is their first winter. I don’t know where this is from, I just assume it is from the air swirling and sucking stones up. Anyway, I would assume this would eventually be rust spots in steel walls.
With the winds lately, I am curious if the fully enclosed trailers (Distinction, Wilson etc) pull easier and give better fuel economy. I hear that rumour but nobody is ever able to quantify it. If true it might be worth it because fuel cost adds up.
I had Wilson super B’s before and could only haul 43T, so I am 2000kg lighter with the Legacy’s. I didn’t notice any real difference in pulling in crosswinds.
For sure my next trailers will have disc brakes and lift axles. Lift axles primarily for easier pulling in the winter, less drag through the snow and hopefully shift some more weight onto the drive axles. I imagine a fully optioned trailer pair will be $200k in another three years though the way things are going. Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 21, 2021 | 09:12 5 I think everybody I know who’s changed trailers lately has gone with Titan but maybe it’s just an Ontario thing Reply With Quote
    helmsdale's Avatar Feb 21, 2021 | 09:16 6 Open ended corrugated steel doepker vs closed end smooth wall Wilson's in a 40mph cross wind pull about 70hp harder. Pulled with a fella that had Wilson's, I had doepker. I was 620hp, he was 550. I could pull away from him all the time, but with a stiff cross wind we were about equal.

    Lift axles add weight, system complexity, and added repair expense. I found no long term advantage regarding tire wear, or brake wear. Weight transfer to drives was not significant enough on empty trailers to make much of a difference in low traction environments. They were nice for turning tight on grass in farmyards, and did give less drag when turning in loose snow. IMHO, the minor gains were more than offset by the negatives. Would not get another set with lift axles. Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 21, 2021 | 09:33 7 Have doepker super bees for about 5 years bought new and they still look new. automatic openers and disk brakes and lift axels no complaints I can get 45000 net kg in trailer and still legal. Reply With Quote
    Feb 21, 2021 | 09:37 8 Good info on lifts, good to hear experiences. I figure the disc brake weight savings would offset some of the extra lift axle weight but if it makes no difference in pulling then perhaps not worth it. Have never pulled trains with lifts so don’t know.

    I did look at the Titan super B last spring and liked a lot about them. They were just slightly heavier than the Distinctions, but not a lot (couple of hundred kg I recall). Lighter than the newest Wilson’s. I like that they are unpainted and 100% aluminum. They were same price or more expensive than the Legacy’s though and I was not willing to pay for the extra weight. They look exceptionally minimal maintenance. I will look at them again next time. Washing these trailers is a waste of money in the winter. Hard to get in and out for less than $150 and they get dirty and salty again so fast. Reply With Quote
    Feb 21, 2021 | 09:42 9 Found my old notes on weights (Doepker is the only one that publishes a base weight, it took a lot of work to get the other weights). Titan was less than Lode King Distinction. Newest Wilson design same weight as Distinction. Can’t verify any of these weights, just what dealers and manufacturers told me.

    Titan: 20,900lbs
    Doepker: 19,600lbs (published)
    Lode King: 21,600lbs
    Wilson: 21,600lbs. Reply With Quote
    Feb 21, 2021 | 11:48 10 So the lifts and disc brakes must add a fair cost to trailers ? Heard new trailer hubs are grease not oil is that true if so how's that working out ? Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Feb 21, 2021 | 11:54 11 I don't know but I've been told disc brakes can be brutally pricey to work on. Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 21, 2021 | 12:01 12 What about freezing up disc compared to the old drums ? Reply With Quote
    Feb 21, 2021 | 12:13 13 If I was actually considering purchasing I would not look at anything but a Doepker.

    I have a good working arrangement with a trucking company and Cargill so I don't haul much myself. With the line ups I hear about and see I am not sure I want to spend the time trucking my own. The trucks don't run for free either and I try to fix what I can myself but it really makes me question if it really pays to haul everything by oneself Reply With Quote

  • Feb 21, 2021 | 12:43 14
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Cowzilla View Post
    What about freezing up disc compared to the old drums ?
    Never had trouble with disk brake when cold. Had lots of trouble with the drums. If I remember right was about a 4000 dollar option. Reply With Quote
    Feb 21, 2021 | 13:13 15 This info sure helps everyone, thanks. I was hit with quite a few questions from the boss at the Friday ( info-happyhour meeting) so maybe something in the works. Reply With Quote
    helmsdale's Avatar Feb 21, 2021 | 13:39 16
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Cowzilla View Post
    So the lifts and disc brakes must add a fair cost to trailers ? Heard new trailer hubs are grease not oil is that true if so how's that working out ?
    New Hendrickson hubs are indeed synthetic grease hubs... I'm not necessarily a fan. Sure you dont get wheel seal leaks, ,but wheel seals do not leak of their own accord, typically they are a precursor to bearing failure. They are considered service free for a period of 7 years. Then they're supposed to be all pulled off, cleaned, inspected, and repacked just like the old days.

    As far as disc brakes go... yes, they are expensive. They do not freeze like drum brakes do, but if you follow proper procedures they are mostly freeze free. They are supposed to be free of brake fade, but damn, I don't know what sort of situation you would have to get yourself into to lose drum brakes. I used to drag while descending mountain grades and never once in my life ever experience brake fade. It takes ALOT to get them so hot that they fail. They are also supposed to be stronger brakes. But then I can make a set of properly setup drum brakes lock right up fully loaded.

    One of the biggest reasons for trucking companies to go with disc brakes is the non-greaseable nature of them. Plenty of drivers that refuse to touch a grease gun, and if you don't lube them, drum brakes start getting pricey when replacing slacks, tubes, and S-cams every year. Reply With Quote
    helmsdale's Avatar Feb 21, 2021 | 14:01 17
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard5 View Post
    The trucks don't run for free either and I try to fix what I can myself but it really makes me question if it really pays to haul everything by oneself
    They most certainly don't run for free... On any truck, new or old, 30-40K workorders on engines are certainly not out of the realm of possibility. Newer ones are frequent visitors to service centers for check engine lights. And if you're running a yellow engine under the hood, parts are getting harder and harder to come by.

    For rough figures... Here's my list of $$$ repairs over the lifetime of ownership.
    -35K Platinum rebuild on C15 engine in 2013
    -11K reman transmission replacement in 2013 (reman provided by Pacific Truck out of Edmonton - stay away from these if at all possible)
    -16K reman transmission replacement in 2017 (provided directly from Eaton - acquired stateside. Every single component is NEW except for the cast steel housing)
    -42K Platinum+ rebuild in 2020 (No labor included in that. Labor in the cost would have been 50K)

    And that's just the "Majors"... Reply With Quote
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    LEP

  • LEP
    Feb 21, 2021 | 14:31 18
    Quote Originally Posted by helmsdale View Post
    They most certainly don't run for free... On any truck, new or old, 30-40K workorders on engines are certainly not out of the realm of possibility. Newer ones are frequent visitors to service centers for check engine lights. And if you're running a yellow engine under the hood, parts are getting harder and harder to come by.

    For rough figures... Here's my list of $$$ repairs over the lifetime of ownership.
    -35K Platinum rebuild on C15 engine in 2013
    -11K reman transmission replacement in 2013 (reman provided by Pacific Truck out of Edmonton - stay away from these if at all possible)
    -16K reman transmission replacement in 2017 (provided directly from Eaton - acquired stateside. Every single component is NEW except for the cast steel housing)
    -42K Platinum+ rebuild in 2020 (No labor included in that. Labor in the cost would have been 50K)

    And that's just the "Majors"...
    It is true if you own a truck you are constantly fixing. I am 15 miles to several delivery options. If I was to pay $7 a tonne (estimated because it has been a few years) on all my grain it would be far more expensive. Generally lineups aren't too crazy or we will shutdown and haul another day.

    Now if I had to haul 50 miles or farther ... I might reconsider. Reply With Quote
    LEP
    Feb 21, 2021 | 14:32 19 How is the paint on a steel Lodeking compared to Doepker? Anybody have first hand experience? Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 22, 2021 | 06:04 20
    Quote Originally Posted by LEP View Post
    How is the paint on a steel Lodeking compared to Doepker? Anybody have first hand experience?
    Have done paint on both ... older trailers had cheap paint... rock chips... corrosion... my loadking with galvanized running gear /alum double wall enclosed combo is the best... but they don't make them any more... they all are money magnets... but my loadking has been the best hands down bought new. with a real light day cab tandem old freightliner... cheapest to run... but not a 'fast ride'!!!

    Cheers
    Last edited by TOM4CWB; Feb 22, 2021 at 06:07.
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    Feb 22, 2021 | 15:19 21 Have had Legacy for five years. Best I’ve ever owned.
    Just to be different, I like lifts. Have had no trouble with them, previous trailer too. Turning empty on snow, or anytime and it’s nice. Does it pay? Not sure.
    I also have an oscillating fifth on them to lessen twisting in and out of fields. Suppose that adds weight too but it looks like it’s worth it.
    Grease hubs have been perfect so far. Surprisingly they roll easier than oil ones when starting out on a -35 morning

    This is third set of Doepker trailers I’ve owned. When everyone compares the rest to Doepker, kinda tells you what you need to know. Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Feb 22, 2021 | 16:24 22 And, if you this helps any they're Canadian made.
    And steel is a poor investment. Reply With Quote
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  • Feb 23, 2021 | 03:27 23
    Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
    And, if you this helps any they're Canadian made.
    And steel is a poor investment.
    1. Can't beat tridem hopper trailer with lifts for pulling around in snowy or slippery yards...
    2. Oscillator 5th wheels with grease banks are best especially for rough terrain in farming application...
    3. Doepker has some better engineering build features in Steel... added them to LodeKings when rebuilt...plus SS light boxes and good heavy steel swivel tow hooks on Rear main crossmember...put wiring in conduit when rewired....
    4. Steel subframes on all... [5th wheel/axle subframes] which all need paint upkeep...
    5. $50K/trailer is easy to spend on complete rebuild... then better to buy new than rebuild...
    6. I like Canadian built better than Wilson... US engineering not as good as S-bees are Canadian invention...
    7. Alum slope sheets can wear out... load grain over hopper slide openings first to reduce wear...
    8. Gravel guard early on subframes can extend trailer life [to stop stone chipping/corrosion]...
    9. High quality synthetic hub oil can't be beat... seals seeping is good warning of wheel bearing issues...
    10. Check trailers and maintain poly-glue/caulk on any seems that meet before rust and corrosion sets in...
    11. Nice electric tarp openers on remotes are sure handy- make sure they have good tarp vents...
    12. Cracking tire sidewalls on retreads [not enough miles]make them useless for farms... steel wheel paint never lasts...hopper openers on both sides...

    Cheers
    Last edited by TOM4CWB; Feb 23, 2021 at 03:56.
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    Feb 23, 2021 | 07:57 24 Yes did talk to couple of guys that did rebuild never again just didn't pencil out. Wiring on loadking has been good had to do a rewire on front trailer after a -30 blown tire incident after that just replacing a few blown pots . Its what we can't see thats starting to be a concern also. Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Feb 23, 2021 | 10:41 25 I have a friend working at one of the big trailer retailers repair etc in Edmonton. He sees it all. Great info source. Good luck. Reply With Quote