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Fujiwhara Effect: Two Lows Do a "Dance" Above Canada

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Feb 21, 2021 | 01:17 1 https://weather.com/news/weather/video/fujiwhara-effect-watch-two-lows-do-a-dance-above-canada

Fujiwhara Effect: Watch Two Lows Do a "Dance" Above Canada

February 19, 2021
We sometimes talk about the fujiwhara effect during hurricane season, but hurricanes don't have to be involved to see the effect.

These two lows 'dancing' over northern Canada looks to me helped prolong the Record US southern Cold snap...

"Video Transcript


the darker gray squirrels that you see here are 2 low pressure systems over Canada and if you watch closely you'll see they do a little dance called the Fujiwara affect the food you wore a fact is named after meteorologist named Dr Fujiwara who figured out that sometimes 2 storms will move around a common pivot point and in this case there were 2 mid latitude cyclones less than 1200 miles away from each other captured by the goes east satellite in the days leading up to Valentine's day in the tropics it's uncommon for the 2 storms to merge and become a larger one just because 2 storms are in proximity and start to rotate many other outcomes are possible including the scenario where one system can ingest the other one and weakens it in this case we see a merge a split and then another merge sped up over the course of 5 days"

Tornadoes may be more common in early spring this year due to the ongoing La Niña.

On average, tornado potential moves northwestward from the winter months to the Plains states where the potential maximizes in May as the juxtaposition of heat, humidity and wind shear overlap in Tornado Alley.

But ingredients that are known to produce tornadoes come together in a distinctly more northern location in La Niña springs according to research published in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology in 2017.

La Niña is the periodic cooling of waters in the eastern equatorial Pacific that is known to change seasonal weather patterns throughout the world. El Niño is the warming of these same waters, which leads to different effects on weather patterns.

Several trends in severe weather ingredients were examined during both El Niño and La Niña seasons: jet stream level winds, low-level winds at around 5,000 feet, and instability.

Severe weather is possible when large storm systems have these ingredients, among others, available to them.

The first of these ingredients – wind shear – is most frequently available as we transition from winter to spring and the jet stream begins its typical retreat northward but remains strong. The stronger the winds at 30,000+ feet, often, the more wind shear there is.

According to the study, the jet stream is often farther north and more amplified in La Niña conditions. This northward alignment encourages the development of thunderstorms farther north and west, which creates the opportunity for more tornado outbreaks...

https://weather.com/storms/severe/news/2021-02-19-la-nina-severe-weather-season Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Feb 21, 2021 | 08:01 2 So that would promote a warmer, dryer summer with the possibility of a freak storm dumping 6 inches of rain and hail on our western provs. hmmm sounds like my crop ins. will be going up along with eveything else on this farm. We here will be in trouble if the 90 day forecast is close. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Feb 21, 2021 | 09:00 3 In 1988, the theme was “Omega block”

    Maybe I shouldn’t have reminded every one. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Feb 21, 2021 | 09:13 4
    Quote Originally Posted by Rareearth View Post
    In 1988, the theme was “Omega block”

    Maybe I shouldn’t have reminded every one.
    But that baby was one big hulkin' HIGH pressure cell that barely moved.

    Remember it well, along with the grasshoppers ! Reply With Quote
    Feb 21, 2021 | 09:47 5
    Quote Originally Posted by Rareearth View Post
    In 1988, the theme was “Omega block”

    Maybe I shouldn’t have reminded every one.
    Think that was the year the tornado raised hell at our farm. Remember hunkering down in the basement. Reply With Quote
    Feb 21, 2021 | 09:59 6 Imagine if all the research dollars, time, resources, computing power etc. that is invested into the debunked climate change theory, had instead have been invested into researching actual past and present day weather phenomenons such as this, and using that information to try to develop useful long term forecasts.
    We could then prepare for the upcoming extreme weather, or growing season anomalies.

    Instead we just spend more effort finding a way to blame all weather events on CO2 alone. Reply With Quote

  • fjlip's Avatar Feb 21, 2021 | 10:20 7 "Instead we just spend more effort finding a way to blame all weather events on CO2 alone."

    WE is the EVIL losers/liars/crooks/sheep.

    Every kind of weather is ONLY C02 fault? Those people are dumber than rocks/posts! Reply With Quote

  • Feb 21, 2021 | 11:55 8
    Quote Originally Posted by Rareearth View Post
    In 1988, the theme was “Omega block”

    Maybe I shouldn’t have reminded every one.
    YA forgot about that term guess the media was using high tec language already back then too. Reply With Quote
    Feb 22, 2021 | 09:50 9
    Quote Originally Posted by fjlip View Post
    "Instead we just spend more effort finding a way to blame all weather events on CO2 alone."

    WE is the EVIL losers/liars/crooks/sheep.

    Every kind of weather is ONLY C02 fault? Those people are dumber than rocks/posts!
    Very true. In fact, both rocks and posts contain more useful information than all of the worlds Chuckchucks combined.

    The rocks, especially the sedimentary type tell us a lot about the earths conditions (climate) when they were laid down, the fossils within are irrefutable proof of climate conditions. The limestone rocks tell us where the once abundant CO2 ended up, and why we found ourselves on the brink of CO2 starvation, and where the current slightly elevated levels will sink back to when we run out of fossil fuel sources to maintain them.
    The fence posts contain tree rings, which in arid climates are a reasonable indicator of dry years ( not wet years unfortuantely). They even tell us how much faster growing and drought tolerant those trees are compared to prior years when CO2 was so much more limited.

    And having an intelligent discussion with rocks and posts is far more constructive than our vain attempts to have said conversation with the true believers of global warming. Reply With Quote