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Jan 20, 2021 | 13:55 1 Name:  Logs.jpg
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We harvested a significant cut of hard maple from our main woodlot last week. Took out 50 large maples from that 20 acre piece.

We left far more than that behind for a future harvest, as I have always done. We take out nice timber every few years, but this was a bigger cut than usual.

They were very good quality, mature trees that averaged just about 400bf per tree.

Decided to let someone else do the cutting and skidding this time - there comes a time when physical changes dictate that one needs to let go and let someone else do the work. That did not come easily - cutting timber was always my favorite job on the farm.

And then there's the attachment factor - since we moved to this place, I spent almost 60 years watching these trees grow into the magnificent specimens they had become.

But time has shown that, as tough as it feels, when you cut a tree, the hole it leaves fills up with new growth. And when this new growth is mature, it will be my grandsons that benefit.

The cycle of nature.

It's a different kind of harvest. Reply With Quote

  • Jan 20, 2021 | 13:59 2 Please remit your carbon tax. Thank you Reply With Quote
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  • Jan 20, 2021 | 14:01 3
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    Please remit your carbon tax. Thank you
    Just keep quiet, smartass. You'll give someone ideas...

    Or are you referring to all the carbon credits I received over the years that they were sequestering?

    Oh wait - it never arrived...
    Last edited by burnt; Jan 20, 2021 at 14:07.
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  • Jan 20, 2021 | 14:02 4 Any burl maple? Reply With Quote
    Jan 20, 2021 | 14:07 5
    Quote Originally Posted by sumdumguy View Post
    Any burl maple?
    Nope.

    Left one behind that the buyer had marked as I thought judging by the bark that it might be a curly or birds-eye maple.

    That one I will saw up myself. Reply With Quote
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  • fjlip's Avatar Jan 20, 2021 | 14:35 6 You must have different Maple trees. Here the ones we planted in 1988 are a twisted multibranched mess, mostly died, good for nothing. Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Jan 20, 2021 | 14:43 7 Hope you can get some good dollars for them. Stumpage fees were abou $8 / m3 a year ago but last fall were $65 to $75. Doesn't sound like much money for the logs but translates to a fair amount when buying lumber. Don't have nice hardwoods here though. Reply With Quote
    Jan 20, 2021 | 17:42 8
    Quote Originally Posted by fjlip View Post
    You must have different Maple trees. Here the ones we planted in 1988 are a twisted multibranched mess, mostly died, good for nothing.
    These are hard maple, aka sugar maple, and grow very well on our gravelly bottom ground. Our bush produces tall trees that grew with enough competition to make them stretch up high with very few limbs until the crown spreads out.

    They were commonly at least 40' to the first branch and some much more.The butt diameter ranged from 24" to 34" diameter.

    The price has come back up more than double from last year when I sold just a few trees.

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  • Jan 20, 2021 | 19:54 9 Looks good Burnt
    We have land along the Carrot River that is covered with Manitoba Maples but they grow sideways as much as they grow up. Really hard to find anything straight and of decent size.
    What will you do with your logs? Reply With Quote
    Jan 20, 2021 | 22:13 10 Very interesting. It sounds like your maples grow like a poplar does here with competition. We’ve got a couple Manitoba maples and some others but they’re in a windbreak setting so they are more wider than tall.

    We toured a sugar maple operation 5 years ago when we were by Hamilton for a friends wedding and it was pretty cool.

    Nice to see how others do things. 🍀 Reply With Quote
    Jan 20, 2021 | 22:17 11 We have “liberal” maples here
    All twisted, crooked and good for nothing Reply With Quote
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  • Jan 20, 2021 | 22:19 12 Manitoba maples aka, box elders here. Yup much different growth habit. We started tapping ours several years ago and make our own syrup. They have about half the sugar content of sugar maples. Takes about 80 litres of sap to make a litre of syrup. But the syrup is pretty darn good.

    It’s an UNTAPPED resource, as we have lots of box elders out here. Reply With Quote
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  • Jan 20, 2021 | 22:20 13
    Quote Originally Posted by caseih View Post
    We have “liberal” maples here
    All twisted, crooked and good for nothing
    Tap em! The kids love it. With aunt jemima now banished, you do what you gotta do! Reply With Quote
    Jan 20, 2021 | 22:49 14
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    Manitoba maples aka, box elders here. Yup much different growth habit. We started tapping ours several years ago and make our own syrup. They have about half the sugar content of sugar maples. Takes about 80 litres of sap to make a litre of syrup. But the syrup is pretty darn good.

    It’s an UNTAPPED resource, as we have lots of box elders out here.
    yea lots doing it here too, it is good Reply With Quote
    Jan 20, 2021 | 23:16 15 We have a tendency of picking up seeds and planting them here when we come home so this little prickly seed hitched a ride from Hyde Park London to Regina. It got planted in the front flower bed. We never thought it would amount to anything. In about 5 seasons it is about 7 feet tall with fan type leaves. The nearest we can figure is that this is a Horse Chestnut but if it is it will be a monster. Reply With Quote
    Jan 21, 2021 | 04:27 16
    Quote Originally Posted by sumdumguy View Post
    We have a tendency of picking up seeds and planting them here when we come home so this little prickly seed hitched a ride from Hyde Park London to Regina. It got planted in the front flower bed. We never thought it would amount to anything. In about 5 seasons it is about 7 feet tall with fan type leaves. The nearest we can figure is that this is a Horse Chestnut but if it is it will be a monster.
    Sounds about right. And if it is, in not too many years you will have the pleasure of scooping up those little prickly seeds by the wheelbarrow loads!! Our one son has a few and is not at all fond of the mess they make when mature.

    Hopefully the flower bed isn't right by the house? They do grow out big and wide.

    London isn't that far from our place. Next time, coffee's on...

    I sold these logs to a mill that saws hardwood lumber going into requested dimension stock for different products. He had an order for 10/4 so these bigger than usual logs will work well for that. Reply With Quote
    Jan 21, 2021 | 04:42 17
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    Manitoba maples aka, box elders here. Yup much different growth habit. We started tapping ours several years ago and make our own syrup. They have about half the sugar content of sugar maples. Takes about 80 litres of sap to make a litre of syrup. But the syrup is pretty darn good.

    It’s an UNTAPPED resource, as we have lots of box elders out here.
    That takes a lot of boiling unless you have a R.O. machine.

    The ratio here is anywhere from 20:1 to 40:1.

    Guys who tap in the thousands around here use R.O. and it cuts the boiling/evaporation time by over half. So those who may have up to 20 or 30 thousands taps sure save on the wood cutting or propane bill.

    Today's SS evaporators are sure a different beast than the old, galvanized flat pan, 28" x72", that Dad and I used years ago.

    It was those big trees we just harvested that were tapped those years ago. I hope Dad made lots of money on that syrup (he didn't) because it sure hurt the value of those logs now.

    There were very few veneer logs due to the tap marks and the subsequent brown stain that spreads up and sideways from that lil bore hole. Once the brown heart starts to expand outward from the center, the value drops sharply.

    Veneer hard maple might be up to $4.00/bf, where good saw logs will bring from $.80 to $1.20/bf on the stump. Used to be that a nice percentage of the butt logs from this woodlot would be veneer, but not any more.

    So because of that, the value of one tree could drop $200. or more :-(
    Last edited by burnt; Jan 21, 2021 at 04:45.
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    Jan 21, 2021 | 05:13 18

    Here’s one for you, I was sawing up some cedar and saw something shiny. Thought I hit a nail but it didn’t bother the saw so it couldn’t have been very hard. I cut it almost perfectly in half Reply With Quote
    Jan 21, 2021 | 05:39 19
    Quote Originally Posted by dalek View Post


    Here’s one for you, I was sawing up some cedar and saw something shiny. Thought I hit a nail but it didn’t bother the saw so it couldn’t have been very hard. I cut it almost perfectly in half
    A bullet or shotgun slug, maybe?

    When I was working as a cutter, the odd time I would hit an old spile that was missed when the sap buckets were taken down at the end of the season.

    The worst was one of those old cast iron spiles - they would destroy a saw chain!

    One time when I was cutting a maple, I felt the saw give a bit of a lurch and figured I hit a spile, likely one of those tin spiles rather than a cast one, since it didn't jerk the saw so bad.

    Got the tree down and looked at the stump and the matching half still in the tree butt - it was a hunk of shiny lead about the size of a 12 gauge slug. Didn't harm the chain at all.

    You just never know.

    Breakfast time - oatmeal is ready - best served with a good pour of maple syrup on top of the special mix, LOL!

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  • Jan 21, 2021 | 05:53 20 .22 hollowpoint Reply With Quote
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  • Jan 21, 2021 | 07:16 21
    Quote Originally Posted by dalek View Post

    Here’s one for you, I was sawing up some cedar and saw something shiny. Thought I hit a nail but it didn’t bother the saw so it couldn’t have been very hard. I cut it almost perfectly in half
    What kind of mill are you running? Reply With Quote
    Jan 21, 2021 | 08:08 22
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    That takes a lot of boiling unless you have a R.O. machine.

    The ratio here is anywhere from 20:1 to 40:1.

    Guys who tap in the thousands around here use R.O. and it cuts the boiling/evaporation time by over half. So those who may have up to 20 or 30 thousands taps sure save on the wood cutting or propane bill.

    Today's SS evaporators are sure a different beast than the old, galvanized flat pan, 28" x72", that Dad and I used years ago.

    It was those big trees we just harvested that were tapped those years ago. I hope Dad made lots of money on that syrup (he didn't) because it sure hurt the value of those logs now.
    I use a Turkey broiler and propane. Collect the sap, fire it up and let it steam away for the day, adding more sap as the level drops. I finish it up on the stovetop in the evening. We make maybe ten to twenty litres of syrup each spring. Enough to use and give some away. Ppl are always in shock that you can do this in Saskatchewan. Trouble is getting good flow weather. There is one commercial operator in Saskatchewan at kamsack who uses RO to reduce boil times. He also uses a vac system with his taps. Kind of a cool setup. Reply With Quote
    Jan 21, 2021 | 08:18 23
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    What kind of mill are you running?
    HUD-Son 336 Oscar Reply With Quote