Test Convey of prime Alberta beef headed your way Burnt Test

Beef Production

Tools

Convey of prime Alberta beef headed your way Burnt

Test
Jan 15, 2021 | 19:42 1

Loaded out five loads of steers this morning and they are going to Elmwood ON after a stop for grub and water in Thunder Bay. We had one load of heifers go there about 8 years ago and the truck hauled mail out here and cattle back with a tandem trailer. This time there was three regular pots and and two convertible freight pots and all were tri axels.

There must be really good margins in feeding out there to justify the trucking. I’m curious what the shrink is on them too. I’m guessing it’ll be a little more than the 4% that we took off...........

Hopefully they make it there fine and it’s interesting how the market can make all this work. When barley is $6+ the feedlots aren’t too anxious to refill their pens here. Probably not another cattle cheque for us until July when our cull cows normally leave and maybe the market can resemble something more normal by then. 🍀 Reply With Quote

  • GDR
    Jan 15, 2021 | 23:14 2
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post


    Loaded out five loads of steers this morning and they are going to Elmwood ON after a stop for grub and water in Thunder Bay. We had one load of heifers go there about 8 years ago and the truck hauled mail out here and cattle back with a tandem trailer. This time there was three regular pots and and two convertible freight pots and all were tri axels.

    There must be really good margins in feeding out there to justify the trucking. I’m curious what the shrink is on them too. I’m guessing it’ll be a little more than the 4% that we took off...........

    Hopefully they make it there fine and it’s interesting how the market can make all this work. When barley is $6+ the feedlots aren’t too anxious to refill their pens here. Probably not another cattle cheque for us until July when our cull cows normally leave and maybe the market can resemble something more normal by then. 🍀
    I assume they are weighed on farm? Is there ever any disputes? AB trucks? Can one driver make the run or they would be short on hours? Reply With Quote
    Jan 16, 2021 | 09:05 3
    Quote Originally Posted by GDR View Post
    I assume they are weighed on farm? Is there ever any disputes? AB trucks? Can one driver make the run or they would be short on hours?
    We weigh on the truck with a pencil shrink at the Stony Plain seed plant which is about 30km away.

    We’ve had two disputes in about 20 years. One was a single calf that wasn’t quite right and the other was the actual weight was 80 or so lbs lighter than we guesstimated for the sale. Both were settled fairly (I believe at least) with a couple phone calls.

    These trucks were Ontario and Quebec registered. Some of the drivers lived out here though since it’s a regular run for them. The one guy said he drives straight to Thunder Bay and rests while the critters are unloaded at a large barn for their feed and water. They said in Ontario the drive thrus won’t let them walk up to order so they have to pack all their food with them. Can’t be much fun for the driver or the critters.

    We love selling this way since we know what we’re getting before the trucks even show up. It also saves the stress and shrink of another haul and a day at an auction mart too. Only takes 6 minutes of watching a screen to sell a whole year’s production...........😉 Reply With Quote

  • Blaithin's Avatar Jan 16, 2021 | 13:16 4 I follow Ken Schaus on Twitter and he regularly posts about liners of calves from the prairies. Not sure I’ve ever seen him get any from Alberta though.

    How many do you put on a truck Woodland? I’m assuming not the 100+ head they cram on here for jaunts from the auction to feedlots. Ken definitely promotes lots of room and bedding for that long haul. Reply With Quote
    Jan 16, 2021 | 22:09 5
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    I follow Ken Schaus on Twitter and he regularly posts about liners of calves from the prairies. Not sure I’ve ever seen him get any from Alberta though.

    How many do you put on a truck Woodland? I’m assuming not the 100+ head they cram on here for jaunts from the auction to feedlots. Ken definitely promotes lots of room and bedding for that long haul.
    The trucks took 57 or 58 head each and they shrunk out 1038 lbs so about 60,000 lbs each. It’s the buyers organizing the trucks so it’s their call as to how many to send. Kinda interesting that the same total pounds fit on a trailer whether the critters weigh 500 or 1400 lbs. Only seen straw used on these loads going east. Usually shavings, salt, or nothing is used when they go south.

    I don’t really follow Twitter but that fellow mentioned Elmwood a few times and that’s where the trucks are headed. I forgot to ask the drivers with conventional pots what they backhaul since the trucking bill would be crazy enough assuming they can go loaded both ways......... Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Blaithin's Avatar Jan 16, 2021 | 22:19 6 Have to keep an eye out next week and see if he posts about new arrivals. That would be interesting! See them offload on the other end.

    Seen on one post he says two trucks, 200 steers, so that’s not much different than a normal load of weanlings here. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jan 17, 2021 | 10:00 7 Lots of western calves land in here. Or at least, used to. Elmwood is about an hour north of us.

    Who was the trucking company?

    Not nearly as many feedlots left as even 15 years ago.

    Friend of mine buys and feeds 7 or 800 head of 650 weights to finish. Had a bit of hold-over when Cargill shut down due to the WuFlu for a week or so. He said he was loosing $200/hd at that time.

    Said he had to buy the replacements that much cheaper. I said "You're talking to the wrong fella to say that!!"

    Sometimes a guy's most devoted followers are those furthest from home... Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jan 17, 2021 | 10:08 8 Best deal I ever made was in about 2013 or 14 when I bought a load of bred heifers and 2nd calvers out of south-central Saskatchewan.

    The market was just starting to recover from BSE and they cost me $1300 and $1350/hd.

    Thinking back, that was about 100 bucks a head less than I paid for open yearling heifers that landed in here on May 20, 2003.

    We shipped 2 - $1300 calves out of them over the next two years and everybody wanted into cows just like that.

    So 2 calves later, I put them up for sale for $2500 and they sold pronto to the first guy who looked at them. Her even told me I was light on the price - how often do you hear that? A year later he didn't think so anymore.

    It wasn't the whole meal, but it sure helped fill in the dent made by 10 years of BSE prices.

    Not too often when you can more than double your money in cows on a relatively quick turn. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Jan 17, 2021 | 21:24 9
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Have to keep an eye out next week and see if he posts about new arrivals. That would be interesting! See them offload on the other end.

    Seen on one post he says two trucks, 200 steers, so that’s not much different than a normal load of weanlings here.
    Well our critters are already on YouTube because of linked videos from the sale listings so why not Twitter..........

    It would be cool to see what they look like finished and getting graded in the kill plant. If only there was a way to get the results from the kill plant back to the cow/calf guy.............. someone should invent/mandate a tag to follow that animal to provide tracing and feedback along the “chain”. 😉 Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jan 17, 2021 | 21:39 10
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    Lots of western calves land in here. Or at least, used to. Elmwood is about an hour north of us.

    Who was the trucking company?

    Not nearly as many feedlots left as even 15 years ago.

    Friend of mine buys and feeds 7 or 800 head of 650 weights to finish. Had a bit of hold-over when Cargill shut down due to the WuFlu for a week or so. He said he was loosing $200/hd at that time.

    Said he had to buy the replacements that much cheaper. I said "You're talking to the wrong fella to say that!!"

    Sometimes a guy's most devoted followers are those furthest from home...
    Two trucks were from Hutton and Latrace. Never had them here before but they did a great job.

    Quick math we’re out 10cents/lb or $100/hd from last year. Kinda feels like a break even year and ironically everyone around here seems to want more cows. I thought $6 barley and $16 canola would squash that but apparently not. We’re expanding too so I can’t say nothing.

    Next year country baby!🤞



    Moved all the pairs today and will be weaning and hauling them 12 miles tomorrow. I guess we had two days without dealing with yearlings/calves so it’s time to start the process again. 🍀 Reply With Quote
  • 3 Likes


  • Jan 18, 2021 | 07:43 11 Hutton's yard is just north of us a piece and the other I don't know. Reply With Quote
    Jan 18, 2021 | 22:28 12
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    Hutton's yard is just north of us a piece and the other I don't know.
    Very cool.
    It’s a small world when you think about it.


    Today’s trucks. Three of ours and one of my cousin’s. Each got seven loads and relocated the calves without incident............ besides the kick I took in the leg. Still feeling it good but hopefully it’s better before running the cows through for ivomec tomorrow.

    Beautiful weather at least. 🍀 Reply With Quote

  • Jan 19, 2021 | 23:52 13 My Dad told me the death rate on calves shipped to Ontario by train in the 50's and 60's was very high. Fresh weaned calves sitting in rail cars on sidings, it would have been brutal.
    That was before feedlots in the west and dependable long haul diesel trucks pulling cattle liners.

    We've come a long way in the cattle industry, who would want to feed 600 cows with small square bales, it would take most of the day with 2 guys. If you had a hired man, you would make sure you locked him up at night.
    Small square bales drove a lot of farm kids into other careers.
    For you guys in high rain areas round bales were a Godsend, a lot less spoilage.

    Enough rambling on . . . . . Even Led Zeppilin knew when to quit. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jan 20, 2021 | 22:12 14 I remeber the little pens beside the tracks but hereabouts I think they only loaded singles or small groups that went in to the Burns plant in Prince Albert. Burns processed beef and pigs in the one plant. Freind of mine worked there while in college in early 70's.
    Led Zep was popular about then.
    They often only had one animal to go and had to deliver that car in the city to the plant.
    Nowdays they don't want to pull less than 50 cars.
    Different times for sure.
    Last edited by shtferbrains; Jan 20, 2021 at 22:25.
    Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jan 22, 2021 | 07:26 15 I can remember when I was likely still in my teens that carloads of calves came down from the West and were unloaded in the pens beside the rail lines in small towns.

    The ride was just really tough on them is what I remember, Dad never having bought any for ourselves. No vaccines, no rest stop? - they may have been en-route for at least 3 days before they landed in a pen with feed, water and straw.

    Could that be possible? Seems brutal today.

    With the speed that they travel today, there is debate about whether the mandatory rest stop at Thunder Bay is actually beneficial for calves coming from the eastern side of the western provinces. Adds one more handling and stressor.
    Last edited by burnt; Jan 22, 2021 at 07:30.
    Reply With Quote

  • Jan 31, 2021 | 16:02 16 I just saw this thread. It looks like you’ve got a good program going woodland. I see you just weaned. Are your calves vaccinated ahead of weaning? Fall calving? Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Feb 3, 2021 | 20:17 17 Did yours get posted to Twitter Woodland?

    I seen him post a load of Char steers but they were a couple days past when I thought yours would have arrived. Reply With Quote
    Feb 4, 2021 | 20:51 18
    Quote Originally Posted by Happytrails View Post
    I just saw this thread. It looks like you’ve got a good program going woodland. I see you just weaned. Are your calves vaccinated ahead of weaning? Fall calving?
    I’ll start with that I love our cows .......... most of the time. 😉

    Most calves are born in May. We vaccinate the calves in September when the bulls get pulled. When the grass runs out in November we start on the corn grazing. We started off with giving them 3-5 days worth at a time and now give them fields of 90-120 acres at a crack to save time. I don’t think our waste is much different unless it snows a lot.

    We grass the yearlings over summer and sell them around beginning of January usually. After that we then setup portable corrals in the field to leave the cows and haul the calves to a yard for 10 days after weaning. They then run with the bred heifers to have less bunches to feed.

    The corn is almost done so they will bale graze till calving. Only used 8 bales of straw so far and that was for the sick pen at home and they’re way dirtier than everyone else.

    Always looking for ways to save time, money, and headaches here. The corn allows me to feed everyone in a couple hours or less depending if they need supplementing with grain or not. Actually looking forward to calving the most cows ever here in a few months. We nearly doubled the cow herd lately and didn’t change the labour situation much. I’m proud of our little cows and how they adapt to whatever we throw at them.

    Always like hearing and seeing how others do things. Try to do at least one thing different every year to shake things up and break the routine. 🍀



    Our little rockstars😉 Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Feb 4, 2021 | 21:02 19
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Did yours get posted to Twitter Woodland?

    I seen him post a load of Char steers but they were a couple days past when I thought yours would have arrived.
    I followed him for a bit but never saw them either. No Chars here .............. only black with a few red angus to spice it up for us. I guess the critters got to see more of the country than I have in five years. And last year most of the barley went to Chiliwack. Kinda strange when you think that’s almost coast to coast.................. Doing our best to keep the trucks busy😉 Reply With Quote
    Feb 5, 2021 | 21:22 20
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post
    I’ll start with that I love our cows .......... most of the time. 😉

    Most calves are born in May. We vaccinate the calves in September when the bulls get pulled. When the grass runs out in November we start on the corn grazing. We started off with giving them 3-5 days worth at a time and now give them fields of 90-120 acres at a crack to save time. I don’t think our waste is much different unless it snows a lot.

    We grass the yearlings over summer and sell them around beginning of January usually. After that we then setup portable corrals in the field to leave the cows and haul the calves to a yard for 10 days after weaning. They then run with the bred heifers to have less bunches to feed.

    The corn is almost done so they will bale graze till calving. Only used 8 bales of straw so far and that was for the sick pen at home and they’re way dirtier than everyone else.

    Always looking for ways to save time, money, and headaches here. The corn allows me to feed everyone in a couple hours or less depending if they need supplementing with grain or not. Actually looking forward to calving the most cows ever here in a few months. We nearly doubled the cow herd lately and didn’t change the labour situation much. I’m proud of our little cows and how they adapt to whatever we throw at them.

    Always like hearing and seeing how others do things. Try to do at least one thing different every year to shake things up and break the routine. 🍀



    Our little rockstars😉
    I like your program. We’re not that different. Calve late April and May. Sell the yearlings in September. Steers usually about 950 lbs. Wean in November. In this open country ranging out in winter can be dangerous. The reason I asked about vaccinations is because we are real strict about vaccinating at branding and weaning. Modified live, clostridial, and, somnugen. With that program we seldom treat a calf with antibiotics. What I like about the grass yearlings is we put an extra 400 lbs on our calves and just have to do it cheaper than the feedlots which isn’t hard. Reply With Quote

  • Feb 9, 2021 | 10:13 21
    Quote Originally Posted by Happytrails View Post
    I like your program. We’re not that different. Calve late April and May. Sell the yearlings in September. Steers usually about 950 lbs. Wean in November. In this open country ranging out in winter can be dangerous. The reason I asked about vaccinations is because we are real strict about vaccinating at branding and weaning. Modified live, clostridial, and, somnugen. With that program we seldom treat a calf with antibiotics. What I like about the grass yearlings is we put an extra 400 lbs on our calves and just have to do it cheaper than the feedlots which isn’t hard.


    The cows surprised me yesterday in a good way. It was -36 with a good breeze and they didn’t even bother to come see me shred some hay and straw bales for them. They’re getting some rolled oats daily and they all come for that. Otherwise it’s just corn stalks with a few leaves but no cobs left and they’re still happy.

    I agree about vaccinating rather than treating. Lost two calves while corn grazing before weaning to pneumonia since when we move to a new field it’s a week before you can find critters in it. Treated a couple others and talked to a couple vets and they said that was still a fantastic average. I thought it was borderline to a mess though.

    Our math says we can do our current yearling grassing or calve 50% more cows to pencil out the same. I’m pretty sure I’d have a mutiny of family if we did that anyway.

    I love what I do.................. I just wish the feed truck would build air pressure but it’s -44 windchill now. Fun times🍀 Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Feb 9, 2021 | 22:20 22 This covid vaccine thing has me thinking about all the cattle vax we did over a lot of years.
    If you read close the Phizer vax says 95% chance it will stop getting seriously ill from covid.
    Reminds me of pneumonia vax in calves. Still had some that looked scary with green snot hanging out thier nose but just watch they didn't get too droopy and usually passed in a few days. But without a doubt they still had pneumonia.Death loss low to zero as long as you didn't have untreated calves from someone elses herd like community pasture.
    Scour vax the same some years.Scary when you see those wet behinds but mostly just passed through as long as the weather didn't go against you.
    Vaccine most always kept you out of a real shit storm.
    BUT that was at largest % of animals vaccinated, not 50 or 60%. But maybe also much much higher percent infectid at times.
    When I quit buying cattle in life got a lot easier!
    But if you relate that to covid how are the government and all the Nancy's going to take all those positive tests and the walking infectious. What changes from what we have today?
    What's your expectations and experience with vaccine?
    Like to hear Mallee's experiences.
    Last edited by shtferbrains; Feb 9, 2021 at 22:40.
    Reply With Quote
    Feb 9, 2021 | 22:38 23 I'll say I also liked to get as much as possible out of the cows by grassing the yearlings and breeding most of the heifers.
    If your going to have a bunch of good cows and good bulls like you picture you might as well take advantage of those genetics. Best part of having cattle is when your peers want your heifers and will pay top dollar for them.
    In the cattle buisness like life your reputation is what you make it.
    But you get what you deserve not always what you want. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Blaithin's Avatar Feb 10, 2021 | 10:49 24
    Quote Originally Posted by shtferbrains View Post
    This covid vaccine thing has me thinking about all the cattle vax we did over a lot of years.
    If you read close the Phizer vax says 95% chance it will stop getting seriously ill from covid.
    Reminds me of pneumonia vax in calves. Still had some that looked scary with green snot hanging out thier nose but just watch they didn't get too droopy and usually passed in a few days. But without a doubt they still had pneumonia.Death loss low to zero as long as you didn't have untreated calves from someone elses herd like community pasture.
    Scour vax the same some years.Scary when you see those wet behinds but mostly just passed through as long as the weather didn't go against you.
    Vaccine most always kept you out of a real shit storm.
    BUT that was at largest % of animals vaccinated, not 50 or 60%. But maybe also much much higher percent infectid at times.
    When I quit buying cattle in life got a lot easier!
    But if you relate that to covid how are the government and all the Nancy's going to take all those positive tests and the walking infectious. What changes from what we have today?
    What's your expectations and experience with vaccine?
    Like to hear Mallee's experiences.
    Scours and pneumonia vaccines only cover certain strains, they aren’t vaccinations against every type.

    They will list the efficacy against the strains they’re for, so say 95% effective against Histophiluls but that doesn’t mean it’s even a little bit effective against mycoplasma. You wouldn’t be able to say you seen the 5% not covered by the vaccine unless you cultured the type and confirmed that what the calf has was the same kind you vaccinated for.

    Also coming into play here is vaccine handling. I know of people that had big wrecks with IBR because the vaccine was not stored and handled correctly.

    Pfizer and Zoetis and all the companies are never going to say something works 100%, because nothing does. Efficacy is subject to a lot factors. Reply With Quote