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Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 18:21 1 This isn’t really anything I ever thought much about or knew dates of before a couple years ago. Then my dogs found a snare site.

Luckily they’re not as dumb as they pretend, and apparently their periodic time outs on the chain have them trained well enough to sit and wait. Either way, despite being caught multiple times (ok the one isn’t THAT smart), I was lucky to not lose them. The guy took my number and very nicely let’s me know every year when he puts the snares in and pulls them out.

Well I got the call this week so now the dogs are on lockdown. Usually at least one tied up at all times. Not their favourite time of year but it’s better than the preference. And yeah, dogs are supposed to be kept at home but they’re farm dogs, who ever really has a fenced yard for their farm dogs. One day maybe, but until then they do the rotating tie up during snare season.

Once you know when snare season is though, you start to notice how many people post missing rural dogs this time of year. So consider this the PSA of the month. Watch out for wandering dogs! The snare site in question is across a quarter so over half a mile away but that’s not that far for a dogs nose sniffing out the bait. Reply With Quote
Nov 28, 2020 | 18:44 2 This sounds too close to be setting up snares. Any reasonable person would find a location further from a farm yard. Reply With Quote
Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 18:51 3
Quote Originally Posted by Oliver88 View Post
This sounds too close to be setting up snares. Any reasonable person would find a location further from a farm yard.
How far?

Can easily hit a farm here every mile as the crow flies, usually less. And there’s no regulation that I know of stating they have to be a certain distance from yards.

Technically it’s the dog owners responsibility to keep dogs on property. Even in the country they aren’t supposed to be roaming free. If we were to get technical I’m the one in the wrong 99% of the year. My dogs should be secured on my property.
Last edited by Blaithin; Nov 28, 2020 at 21:43.
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 19:03 4 We had an old dog that went missing for a couple of days.
    Wife phoned the trappers we know who knew nothing about it but the old boy shows up the next day with a ring of hair gone off his neck.
    Might have been on old snare I set 50 yrs ago. Who knows. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 20:14 5 I snare every year. You HAVE TO tell anyone within a mile of a snare site that you are setting up. I personally just avoid being that close to anyone. I have never caught a dog. I have had brief knots in my stomach nearing a snare site before though, when I have seen wolf tracks on occasion, which before taking a closer look I thought were dogs. Thankfully. But where I snare, if I caught a dog, it would be a very lost doggie. In Saskatchewan, power snares are the only snare type allowed, and they are LETHAL. Nothing is going to get free. There is no sitting and waiting for your owner, because it’s over once you trigger the spring to release.

    My land backs on to a roadless region. We also get lots of snow, so the chance of a dog going more than ten feet out of its yard is low, unless it’s on a road, and I don’t snare anywhere near roads. Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 20:27 6 sheep, is this what you call a power snare?

    https://www.cabelas.ca/product/61307/ram-snares-coyotebeaver

    Does a person need a trapping license to purchase? Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 20:27 7 sorry, I'll try again.

    https://www.cabelas.ca/product/61307...s-coyotebeaver Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 20:32 8 In Alberta they’re encouraged to tell local homesites to foster good “community relations” but they don’t have too.

    For all I know this guy has been snaring down there the entire time I’ve lived here and the dogs only found it a couple years ago. They usually go west behind the yard, not east.

    Hardly the only example of Alberta having dumb laws. I actually had to leave a sticky note with my number on it at the site to get ahold of the guy. No other way to find out who it was. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 20:47 9
    Quote Originally Posted by beaverdam View Post
    Yup that’s it. But cabelas is about twice the price they are elsewhere. In sask you need a snaring permit to be able to purchase initially. You do not need a trapping license to snare, only to sell the fur.

    Been doing real well with coyote furs, most are from 120 to up to 240 bucks a pelt. My average last year was a bit over 150 bucks. It is a pretty good side venture if so inclined, lots of work, lots of learning.

    It is still so odd to me to set up a snare, with that big steel spring, look at it, and know a coyote will walk; brush right up against it and get caught. It seems impossible, for an animal that will avoid an invisible foothold trap like the plague.

    Having sheep of course I get the control aspect as well. I don’t buy the theories that some have that if your dominant coyotes aren’t lamb killers they won’t let others onto their territory, so you won’t lose lambs. When you catch 40 coyotes at the exact same location, you start to realize how many there are around, and you recognize that the dominant theory doesn’t hold much water. Any coyote worth its salt, would look at lambs and their mouth would water. They are a predator for crying out loud.

    Guard dogs help. Dead coyotes are better, at least thin them out a bit to delay the inevitable, you’ll never get rid of them ever. As long as coyote pelts are wanted, it is hard to pass up the easy income. At least it’s easy income if you are crazy like me and enjoy being out in the cold and enjoy pelting and working with fur to make it shine. Lol

    And if you’ve ever walked out to feed the sheep, and find dead lambs strewn about, you will do anything you can to avoid that picture, for as long as you live.
    Last edited by Sheepwheat; Nov 28, 2020 at 20:49.
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 20:51 10
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    In Alberta they’re encouraged to tell local homesites to foster good “community relations” but they don’t have too.

    For all I know this guy has been snaring down there the entire time I’ve lived here and the dogs only found it a couple years ago. They usually go west behind the yard, not east.

    Hardly the only example of Alberta having dumb laws. I actually had to leave a sticky note with my number on it at the site to get ahold of the guy. No other way to find out who it was.
    Guys who do that are the worst thing for landowner relations and trust. Even if there was no law, you need to be upfront in this day and age. Ethical trappers would not set up so close imho. I would not be impressed if it happened to me. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 21:05 11
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    Guys who do that are the worst thing for landowner relations and trust. Even if there was no law, you need to be upfront in this day and age. Ethical trappers would not set up so close imho. I would not be impressed if it happened to me.
    I wasn’t terribly impressed at the time. But he’s contacted me both years since so I can’t complain.

    To toss in the face of your dominant coyote theory disbelief 😜 I had no coyote issues here for probably the first 6 years I lived here. Then they found my chickens.... They were using their decoy ploy to take my one LGD out one direction while another robbed the chickens. They’d come right up to my doorstep and fight him. I seen at least 4 one night and could’ve kicked them they were so close. They were taking birds right out of the barn. Timing aligned and I got a second LGD but it was still a fight. The dogs would have puppies pinned against the fence (the entire acreage is page wire so only certain holes to go through) and regularly had war wounds. The adults were still constantly trying to do the decoy lure trick and any time the dogs were caught napping a bird would disappear.

    Then the snare winter happened.

    I haven’t had a coyote in the yard since. I’m assuming he cleared out the ones that knew about the easy food source and were determined to take advantage of it, no matter the dogs. The current ones haven’t found anything to make it worth trying to get through the dogs for. They’re happy just walking by the acreage. Deterring them from finding food is much easier than deterring them from food they know is there.

    I don’t necessarily consider it a dominant animal thing, just the adults aren’t teaching the puppies about my chickens. What they don’t know they can easily get, they don’t put much effort in for.

    Now the downfall of baited snares is if my dogs are down there, they also aren’t up at the yard keeping the coyotes out 😂 Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 21:34 12 If I had sheep I agree, zero tolerance for coyote.
    Same if you have sick calves laying around. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 21:34 13 Good luck getting further than a half mile from any yard site around here, even a quarter mile would be tough. Reply With Quote
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  • Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 21:37 14 I mentioned in burnt’s thread how I prefer to deal with coyotes and have found success doing so.

    I’ve shot them right out the front door when they were bad. The snares seem to have taken the rest of the problem ones.

    Now I’m back to simply being able to have dogs, go out and make noise myself, have the radio on... preventative maintenance sort of stuff.

    Pretty sure I said on that thread that killing to prevent predation was one tool and one that I consider to be more of a last resort. The guy snaring here is not doing it to prevent or lower predation. He’s a city guy that comes out of Calgary to earn some extra dough on pelts.

    For the most part I can trace all my predator issues down to years and times of the year. Hawks are issues when they have chicks in the nest, owls are an issue in winters when the snow is so deep they have trouble hunting, coyotes were issues when the crop was at peak and was good cover for them to sneak up to the acreage. Learn the predators and it helps you predict when they will make appearances and how you can try and avoid them.

    Except magpies. Those are just right bastards. Get rid of one and it’s like five magically appear out of its feathers.
    Last edited by Blaithin; Nov 28, 2020 at 21:42.
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    Nov 28, 2020 | 21:43 15 I dont know when the law changed but about 30 yr ago when I trapped only registered trappers were allowed to use snares,and only in the green area (aka crown land). Resident trappers ,those in settled areas (aka the white areas) were not allowed to use them,other than beaver and then the entire loop had to be submersed. Thats in Alta Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 21:49 16
    Quote Originally Posted by Horse View Post
    I dont know when the law changed but about 30 yr ago when I trapped only registered trappers were allowed to use snares,and only in the green area (aka crown land). Resident trappers ,those in settled areas (aka the white areas) were not allowed to use them,other than beaver and then the entire loop had to be submersed. Thats in Alta
    You’re supposed to have a license, take the course, to my understanding anyway. Can’t just go out and snare. Not sure how much it’s enforced though. I called Fish and Game when this originally happened because it’s county lease land and the guy on the lease had just passed away and his wife had no idea about any trapping. In no way was F&G even interested in coming out and chatting with the guy. He just told me the 70yr old widow was lying to me and he wasn’t going to drive out from Olds to see otherwise. For all I know the trapper has no license. Although he probably needs one to sell properly?

    Either way it gave me absolutely no faith in F&G. Surprise surprise. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 22:14 17 Yup $400 3 day course to be able to get licence now probably like boating licence so you know about ocean going vessels and bouys,real important on the prairies. Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 22:25 18
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    Good luck getting further than a half mile from any yard site around here, even a quarter mile would be tough.
    Sounds like Saskatchewan in the 1920’s. Now there are a lot of abandoned farmyards that are farmed around until they get cleared off. Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 23:31 19
    Quote Originally Posted by Oliver88 View Post
    Sounds like Saskatchewan in the 1920’s. Now there are a lot of abandoned farmyards that are farmed around until they get cleared off.
    Yeah if I didn’t have paradise as my backyard, it would be difficult to find snare sites more than a mile from a yard. Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 07:18 20 When wolves come to your yard and kill your dog as well as a couple other neighbors dogs, if someone’s dogs is running around near snares they are in much bigger danger in our area.
    Last edited by Dr Tone; Nov 29, 2020 at 09:24.
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    Nov 29, 2020 | 22:45 21 We have a licensed fellow snaring on a couple of our quarters and there hasn’t been an issue yet. Not power snares so a tame dog should be fine anyway. I try to let neighbours know that any dogs chasing cows on our property will be dealt with in a permanent way. We’ve had packs of dogs chase calves through a fence, down the road, and chew holes through their hide at 5 am in a neighbour’s yard on Canada day. I ended up putting the one calf down a day later.

    There is no shortage of stray dogs, coyote, beaver, deer, elk, squirrels, and other assorted destructive wildlife in the neighbourhood. We had over 20 different guys hunting this fall and the last few years and the numbers are still increasing. Ma Nature is a little too resilient at times.

    **end of rant** Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 23:05 22
    Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post
    We have a licensed fellow snaring on a couple of our quarters and there hasn’t been an issue yet. Not power snares so a tame dog should be fine anyway. I try to let neighbours know that any dogs chasing cows on our property will be dealt with in a permanent way. We’ve had packs of dogs chase calves through a fence, down the road, and chew holes through their hide at 5 am in a neighbour’s yard on Canada day. I ended up putting the one calf down a day later.

    There is no shortage of stray dogs, coyote, beaver, deer, elk, squirrels, and other assorted destructive wildlife in the neighbourhood. We had over 20 different guys hunting this fall and the last few years and the numbers are still increasing. Ma Nature is a little too resilient at times.

    **end of rant**
    To be legal snares have to be locking,or power so there is a fast kill. Read the regulations. Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 23:21 23
    Quote Originally Posted by Horse View Post
    To be legal snares have to be locking,or power so there is a fast kill. Read the regulations.
    He uses the locking ones. I know he’s caught a couple dogs over the years and they generally don’t pull so it doesn’t cinch up. He has to check them very regular or else the eagles start chewing up everything. He gets all his paperwork done and keeps it all legit. Great service for everyone including the couple of sheep guys around. Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Nov 30, 2020 | 01:19 24 Not a job i want.
    Yotes stink too much for me and i hate fleas. I swear they're rotting while alive. Colony boys charge $20.
    Hired man even made a machine to make snares. A trick to doing it right.
    He gets all permissions and informs. Checks them often and makes sure to take them all down. Has caught and released one dog.
    Young Hutts all snare. Which is a different story. Reply With Quote
    Nov 30, 2020 | 08:27 25
    Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
    Not a job i want.
    Yotes stink too much for me and i hate fleas. I swear they're rotting while alive. Colony boys charge $20.
    Hired man even made a machine to make snares. A trick to doing it right.
    He gets all permissions and informs. Checks them often and makes sure to take them all down. Has caught and released one dog.
    Young Hutts all snare. Which is a different story.
    I make my shares. Cost is maybe a tenth of buying. When you make hundreds is makes sense...

    Yup. They have an odour. It is hard to take. Worst thing that happened to me is while skinning once, an unknown squirt, of unknown origin, but definitely of known odour and flavour, nailed me in the face. I gagged. I gagged again. That didn’t work, so I dry heaved a few times for good measure. It’s hard when you are wearing coyote slimed rubber gloves, the nearest paper towel is a hundred yards away, and you simply MUST wipe your face, under your nose, before the unknown dribbles into your mouth. Your sleeves aren’t much better than the gloves, let me tell you.

    But somehow, I keep at it and enjoy it. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 30, 2020 | 08:41 26 Guess you should’ve had a mask on 🤐 Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 30, 2020 | 10:52 27
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Guess you should’ve had a mask on 🤐
    I was actually going to end the post with that statement! Lol Reply With Quote
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