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Nov 28, 2020 | 07:55 1 Saskatchewan driller hits 'gusher' with ground-breaking geothermal well that offers hope for oil workers

A first for Canada and the world, the well can produce enough electricity to power 3,000 homes

https://financialpost.com/commoditie...or-oil-workers

"She added that the project was de-risked in part by funding from the federal government, which committed $25.6 million in funding in January 2019 for the project. All told, the geothermal power project is expected to cost $51 million."

Looks like an opportunity to put some oil workers back to work and invest in some renewable clean energy.
Last edited by chuckChuck; Nov 28, 2020 at 08:00.
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Nov 28, 2020 | 08:05 2 Yup sure does....people against the subsidization of energy companies more than happy with the help these projects will receive ...

I am not against it ...thats not the point ....but the environmentalists shouldn't complain about oil and gas subsidies...

Great project but a well is a well is a well ...until it isn't I guess.

Is there 3000 homes left in Southwest Saskatchewan? Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 08:31 3
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    Yup sure does....people against the subsidization of energy companies more than happy with the help these projects will receive ...

    I am not against it ...thats not the point ....but the environmentalists shouldn't complain about oil and gas subsidies...

    Great project but a well is a well is a well ...until it isn't I guess.

    Is there 3000 homes left in Southwest Saskatchewan?
    Their initial drill sites are south west of Estevan. Not sure where this well is but I think it is in the same area. The electricity will go into the grid.

    There still seems to be a lot of complaining about any subsidies to wind and solar projects that will likely provide cheaper electricity than geothermal will, even without subsidies.

    But the point is to compare the costs and benefits of all energy production systems on a level playing field so that we know what the real costs are, including hidden costs that are not included in the price consumers pay. For that reason we need to know and account for direct and indirect subsidies to all forms of energy production including the oil and gas industry.

    Some posters on this site are okay with subsidies to oil and gas but not to cleaner alternatives like geothermal, wind and solar. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 08:55 4 Drilled right under the oil and gas to find hot water, an energy source a million times less dense than FF.

    Only chuck would cheer this insanity on. Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 09:11 5
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Saskatchewan driller hits 'gusher' with ground-breaking geothermal well that offers hope for oil workers

    A first for Canada and the world, the well can produce enough electricity to power 3,000 homes

    https://financialpost.com/commoditie...or-oil-workers

    "She added that the project was de-risked in part by funding from the federal government, which committed $25.6 million in funding in January 2019 for the project. All told, the geothermal power project is expected to cost $51 million."

    Looks like an opportunity to put some oil workers back to work and invest in some renewable clean energy.
    But, but, but , it’s fracked
    Fracking is bad
    You fk-n sheeple are hilarious
    Last edited by caseih; Nov 28, 2020 at 09:15.
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 09:16 6
    Quote Originally Posted by caseih View Post
    But, but, but , it’s fracked
    Fracking is bad
    You fk-n sheeple are hilarious
    You are bringing facts to the discussion??????????????

    Why caseih why????


    hahaha Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • ajl
    Nov 28, 2020 | 09:34 7 Nothing new. There is one in near Swan Hills AB that Razor energy is trying to get generating electricity as well as government grant money permits. This is also a company that is arbitrarily cutting surface lease payments to farmers. They figure they can get away with doing that since much of there backing is from the Alberta Investment Management Co. Think government of AB pensions. Reply With Quote
    ColevilleH2S's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 10:03 8 51 million divided by 3000 homes is $17,000 per household. Is that a reasonable cost for dispatchable generation infrastructure?
    Seems a bit expensive but not out of this world, especially for an experimental project. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 10:22 9
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    Drilled right under the oil and gas to find hot water, an energy source a million times less dense than FF.

    Only chuck would cheer this insanity on.
    They don’t have to find water...

    That’s why old oil wells can be converted to geothermal. You’re drilling deep for the heat, not water. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 10:25 10 we were drilling around fort nelson , wasn't real deep , formation was so hot we had to install a bunch of coolers
    there are places where the formations are way hotter than normal Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 11:43 11 So are some of you suggesting we shut down any geothermal projects and layoff some more workers?

    There are a lot of jobs in new technology and clean energy but I guess these jobs aren't as good? Please explain? Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 11:51 12 Money should only be made by agriculture or oil and gas. Any other employment is libtarded and not real money.

    Lay them off and make them get real jobs! Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • LEP
    Nov 28, 2020 | 11:55 13
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    So are some of you suggesting we shut down any geothermal projects and layoff some more workers?

    There are a lot of jobs in new technology and clean energy but I guess these jobs aren't as good? Please explain?
    Let me guess, in Chuckworld for every 100 jobs there are in drilling and building a geothermal plant, there will be 10 government leaches living off their backs to regulate it. Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 28, 2020 | 12:04 14 If there are no regulations and regulators that would be good LEP. We can put one in your front yard then? Reply With Quote
    LEP
    Nov 28, 2020 | 12:15 15
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    If there are no regulations and regulators that would be good LEP. We can put one in your front yard then?
    Yay, in chuckie's world, economic growth is growth in government payroll. That is the sign of someone who has the pulse of vibrant economy.

    Disclaimer: Sarcasm.

    By the way, my house on the farm is about 60 ft from the centre line of the road. It was there before the road was built. But they should never have been able to build a secondary highway there when a yard was established prior to any regulations.

    So don't talk to me about regulation. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 12:43 16
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    They don’t have to find water...

    That’s why old oil wells can be converted to geothermal. You’re drilling deep for the heat, not water.
    Geothermal always depends on water to transfer the heat. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 12:51 17
    Quote Originally Posted by Happytrails View Post
    Geothermal always depends on water to transfer the heat.
    could be wrong , but i think the referral is that oil wells water out at the end of their life, usually what finishes them or makes a new well unfeasible , water is everywhere Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 28, 2020 | 13:23 18
    Quote Originally Posted by Happytrails View Post
    Geothermal always depends on water to transfer the heat.
    Not really, but the system will depend on the goal. A closed loop system is usually the most common for temperature use and while water can be used, usually it's not.

    Electricity production is about the only type of geothermal to date that focuses on finding a large reservoir which is why it's so extra expensive to set up.

    Can't group all geothermal together as needing to drill to find water. Reply With Quote
    Nov 28, 2020 | 23:08 19 Geothermal cannot even be compared with wind or solar. It produces useful energy.
    One word, dispatchable. Geothermal is in the same league as coal, gas, nuclear, hydro.
    It can produce useful reliable dispatchable energy(electricity in this case) which a modern industrialized society requires ( and expects) to function, with no deleterious ( or expensive) effects on the reliability of the grid.

    If it can be done at a cost that compares to the other dispatchable electricity generation sources is not as certain. But what can be certain, is that the generation cost that it is sold to the grid for, is the entire cost, unlike the unreliable sources which cause a cascade of higher costs all the way to the end consumer, regardless of any uninformed and ignorant claims of being cheapest.

    The energy potential is massive, and it exists virtually anywhere, the environmental footprint (and above ground footprint) is insignificant, the required technology is all existing off the shelf type stuff ( and much of it home grown, and mature enough to be very cost effective), the sustainability is not in doubt, just the full life cycle EROEI that needs to be proven.

    The shallow residential type geothermal systems which were becoming popular back when nat gas was expensive, and electrity was affordable, nearly all got turned off when gas got cheap, and electricity became artificially high. It took more dollars worth of energy to pump the fluid than came out the other end. On paper, these deep systems have a much higher EROEI, but there is also the issue that the temperature gradient declines over time. Time will tell. I'm optimistic.
    Last edited by AlbertaFarmer5; Nov 28, 2020 at 23:16.
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  • Nov 29, 2020 | 00:21 20 Brooks solar farm is a 15 megawatt facility that cost $30 million to build. This geothermal project is a 20 megawatt facility with a projected total cost of $51 million dollars. One uses hardware built in China, the other uses hardware and technology built primarily in Canada. One produces intermittent power that requires a second generation source to produce power 24 hrs a day, the other produces electricity 24 hrs a day all on its own. Which one makes more sense? Reply With Quote

  • Nov 29, 2020 | 09:05 21 Both make sense when part of a smart grid and used strategically.

    Canada has a tremendous hydro resources but many provinces are not using surplus hydro from Quebec, Manitoba and BC. Instead our grids are designed to export surplus hydro electricity to the US instead of other provinces.

    Geo thermal may prove to be a great option but that should not stop us from putting lots of solar and wind capacity where it makes sense.

    Even fossil fuel plants don't run all the time and are shut down for maintenance and rebuilding and sometimes equipment failure. Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 09:13 22 When conventional (reliable) generation plants are shut down for maintenance, upgrades etc. They have to schedule that work months to years in advance, so the regulator can plan accordingly. Only 2 generation sources can shut down with zero notice. Yet be paid the same, as if each has the same value to a grid which is expected to have 100% uptime.

    When solar and wind have a non zero number in the DCR - Dispatched (and Accepted) Contingency Reserve column and are doing so at prices that are still competitive with sources which are required to have a non zero amount of DCR, then we can compare apples to apples. Reply With Quote
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  • Nov 29, 2020 | 09:18 23 Sask power must have this figured out. They are adding significant wind and backing up with more Manitoba hydro and new gas plants. And our farm rates are still probably going to be cheaper than Alberta's privatized system. Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 09:31 24
    Quote Originally Posted by Hamloc View Post
    Brooks solar farm is a 15 megawatt facility that cost $30 million to build. This geothermal project is a 20 megawatt facility with a projected total cost of $51 million dollars. One uses hardware built in China, the other uses hardware and technology built primarily in Canada. One produces intermittent power that requires a second generation source to produce power 24 hrs a day, the other produces electricity 24 hrs a day all on its own. Which one makes more sense?
    Except it is much worse than the numbers indicate.
    From the NEB:
    National Energy Board has calculated capacity for areas where Alberta has potential utility-scale solar and indicates the capacity factors range from 13% in Collin Lake to 18% at Peigan Timber.
    Using the average of that would make Brooks a 2.325 MW facility by output, rather than nameplate, up to $13 million per MW capacity.
    Assume 90% uptime on the geothermal, would be $2.8 million per MW capacity.
    Not clear if the output of the geothermal is net, including energy required for pumping etc? Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 09:39 25 Even fossil fuel plants don't run all the time and are shut down for maintenance and rebuilding and sometimes equipment failure

    When those plants are built ..they typically have standby equipment that is available in case of castrophic failures...

    They do condition monitoring so they can take a piece offline....fix it...while using the standby equipment... Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 10:09 26 So this thing can theoretically when complete, generate 3MW? The smallest hydro dam in Manitoba is 10MW, it was built in the 1950's.
    Maybe this is just a pilot project that can be dramatically scaled up if successful?
    I know the latest hydro projects in Manitoba are insanely expensive but the scale of production is real.
    Does Saskatchewan not have river systems in the north that could be utilized for Hydro generation?
    3MW is in the realm of backup diesel powered generators.
    Last edited by Jay-mo; Nov 29, 2020 at 10:13.
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    Nov 29, 2020 | 10:17 27
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    Geothermal cannot even be compared with wind or solar. It produces useful energy.
    One word, dispatchable. Geothermal is in the same league as coal, gas, nuclear, hydro.
    It can produce useful reliable dispatchable energy(electricity in this case) which a modern industrialized society requires ( and expects) to function, with no deleterious ( or expensive) effects on the reliability of the grid.

    If it can be done at a cost that compares to the other dispatchable electricity generation sources is not as certain. But what can be certain, is that the generation cost that it is sold to the grid for, is the entire cost, unlike the unreliable sources which cause a cascade of higher costs all the way to the end consumer, regardless of any uninformed and ignorant claims of being cheapest.

    The energy potential is massive, and it exists virtually anywhere, the environmental footprint (and above ground footprint) is insignificant, the required technology is all existing off the shelf type stuff ( and much of it home grown, and mature enough to be very cost effective), the sustainability is not in doubt, just the full life cycle EROEI that needs to be proven.

    The shallow residential type geothermal systems which were becoming popular back when nat gas was expensive, and electrity was affordable, nearly all got turned off when gas got cheap, and electricity became artificially high. It took more dollars worth of energy to pump the fluid than came out the other end. On paper, these deep systems have a much higher EROEI, but there is also the issue that the temperature gradient declines over time. Time will tell. I'm optimistic.
    I've been interested in geo-thermal systems since they started to become popular. However, almost everyone I know that has one says they are very expensive. They are expensive to install and expensive to maintain. Breakdowns usually cost in the 1000's not hundreds. This is residential. Reply With Quote
    Nov 29, 2020 | 16:40 28 I’m too lazy to do research so how do you generate electricity from a hot well? I understand residential geothermal systems and their shortcomings but this is a game changer if it comes to fruition. Reply With Quote