Test How to train your neighbourhood coyote Test

Commodity Marketing

Tools

How to train your neighbourhood coyote

Test
Nov 23, 2020 | 21:45 1 It takes balls.

Brought to you by your Communist Broadcasting Corporation.

"While any kind of noise will do the trick, she prefers to throw balls, charge at the animal and yell "bad coyote."


You cannot make this stuff up.


https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.5810391?__t...mpression=true

This is Toronto stuff.

Some of the comments are priceless -
Last edited by burnt; Nov 23, 2020 at 21:50.
Reply With Quote
Blaithin's Avatar Nov 23, 2020 | 22:00 2 I don't see what's wrong with it. Why let the fear of looking ridiculous stand in the way of an idea that might work quite well?

I have an uncle that tries to tail tip them with the gun. Trains them to stay out of the yard. Reply With Quote
Nov 23, 2020 | 22:12 3
Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
I don't see what's wrong with it. Why let the fear of looking ridiculous stand in the way of an idea that might work quite well?

I have an uncle that tries to tail tip them with the gun. Trains them to stay out of the yard.
Oh that's nasty.

So much less cruel to just use sticks and balls. And does he yell "BAD COYOTE" to try to shame them into leaving? :-0

Well at least the imagery is powerful, LOL! Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Nov 23, 2020 | 22:25 4 My god!!! They are going to bring out the umbrellas’s!! Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Blaithin's Avatar Nov 23, 2020 | 22:26 5 Usually what people yell at animals is for our benefit, not theirs, considering it doesn't tend to matter what we say, they can't understand it anyway. The average person isn't going to have the imagination to yell something completely irrelevant at a coyote. Their mind is going to come up with Bad Coyote or **** Off or **** I suck ass at throwing sand filled tennis balls.

    Can't usually get close enough to the ones on the farm to toss balls or umbrellas at them. They're trying to be sneaky. So you have to put the fear of Coyote into them with a tail tip out of nowhere. They learn fast. Reply With Quote
    Nov 23, 2020 | 22:38 6
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    It takes balls.

    Brought to you by your Communist Broadcasting Corporation.

    "While any kind of noise will do the trick, she prefers to throw balls, charge at the animal and yell "bad coyote."


    You cannot make this stuff up.


    https://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.5810391?__t...mpression=true

    This is Toronto stuff.

    Some of the comments are priceless -
    Except I can see where they’re trying it from my back yard which is 1,700 miles from Toronto. Kinda scary that thinking crept out here.

    Using their own analogy that noise and such will scare them shouldn’t they have not moved into the city in the first place? I highly doubt we’ll hear what an overwhelming success this will be. A finely tuned scope on the .243 or my trapper buddy with snares is a solution that works fine for us. Wile E. Coyote got his name for a reason............... Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • makar's Avatar Nov 23, 2020 | 22:56 7 Anything i say is usually after pulling the trigger. Reply With Quote

  • Nov 24, 2020 | 07:54 8 Well it would seem to me that a properly woke environmentalist would NOT be deliberately trying to shame a coyote into leaving the area. (After all, riddle me this: who was there first?)

    Wouldn't a degree in the humanities or social sciences inform the human to try to elevate the coyote to a higher degree of social credit?

    I would suggest wandering slowly and nonthreatening toward the "wayward" creature, playing Mozart or Chopin at comfortable levels. Maybe with a doggie treat or cookie in hand? Probably not Strauss, as his sounds tended more toward the excitable side. Keep him for later when the coyote is more suitably domesticated and attuned to our superior cultural standing.

    But there I go projecting my values on another creature - "...bad man , bad, bad man!"

    So hard to check my privilege and male toxicity. Back to the gun. A .270 goes a long way toward transformation.... Reply With Quote

  • Blaithin's Avatar Nov 24, 2020 | 08:09 9 Your mockery makes your opinions much more appealing.

    Have you never seen the wardens in Banff shoot the elk with little nerf gun things?

    Animals shouldn’t have to constantly die because people are idiots. Especially if methods like foam bullets and tennis balls help limit paths crossing.

    Preventative maintenance and all that.
    Last edited by Blaithin; Nov 24, 2020 at 08:15.
    Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Nov 24, 2020 | 09:33 10 i like having a few coyotes , foxes , etc around on the farm , in fact a fox is an occasional visitor with us in our pole shed
    but they don't belong in edmonton or any other city, as attested to, by the people that lost loved ones in nova scotia
    those particular ones are just useless animals that have forgotten how to hunt and work
    part of the liberal disease that has spread over this land
    i say catch them in a live trap, pay them Cerb, and then move them to an internment camp on a Res, what could possibly go wrong ?
    or just use the 204 on these useless animals , great to see them drop before you feel the recoil on your shoulder
    once an animal has lost his ability to hunt and work for food , its the end of the line
    Last edited by caseih; Nov 24, 2020 at 09:44.
    Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • blackpowder's Avatar Nov 24, 2020 | 09:58 11 Humans forget that they are the only animal that doesn't devote all its energy on survival.
    Nuisance carnivores can never be totally safe. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Nov 24, 2020 | 10:13 12
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Your mockery makes your opinions much more appealing.

    Have you never seen the wardens in Banff shoot the elk with little nerf gun things?

    Animals shouldn’t have to constantly die because people are idiots. Especially if methods like foam bullets and tennis balls help limit paths crossing.

    Preventative maintenance and all that.
    I am hurt that you would see my astute comment (IMNTBHO) as mockery!!

    While perhaps a tad extreme, it illustrates how post-modern thinking can be applied!

    But ignoring the deep hurt I now feel, there are a couple of points in your reply that do not stand up.

    First, is it smart or accurate to compare a herbivorous, "naturally-frightened-by-human presence" elk to an aggressive, carnivorous predator that sees you as a sweet meat?

    I call non sequitur.

    Second, I think my young, shepherd neighbour who has lost close to 2 dozen lambs to furry predators this year would resent being called an idiot.

    Finally, coyotes have few natural predators once they take up residence in a place like the numerous ravines of Toronto. Once peoples' little kitties and floor mops start getting stolen and eaten from the back deck, they tend to gain a more educated-by-realism view.

    Foxes I have no problem with. They are a farmer's friend, in my experience.

    Wolves and coyotes have proven themselves to be endlessly destructive, coast to coast.
    Last edited by burnt; Nov 24, 2020 at 10:21.
    Reply With Quote
    Nov 24, 2020 | 10:14 13
    Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
    Humans forget that they are the only animal that doesn't devote all its energy on survival.
    Nuisance carnivores can never be totally safe.
    Cougars, wolves and coyotes don't either, or why would they kill many more sheep than they eat, at times? Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Nov 24, 2020 | 10:31 14
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    Cougars, wolves and coyotes don't either, or why would they kill many more sheep than they eat, at times?
    Perhaps we should ask the wolves.
    Or consider the long domesticated cat playing with a mouse. No one can deny their instinct or nature. Reply With Quote
    Nov 24, 2020 | 10:34 15 76357 coyote pelts sold at fur auction august 2020,and how many just shot and left lay.
    Fairly prolific I would say. Reply With Quote
    Nov 24, 2020 | 11:02 16
    Quote Originally Posted by Horse View Post
    76357 coyote pelts sold at fur auction august 2020,and how many just shot and left lay.
    Fairly prolific I would say.
    whats a good coyote hide fetching now , horse?
    shipped lots to dominion soudak as a kid , try to live and let live for the most part now
    unless forced to act Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 24, 2020 | 11:14 17
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    I am hurt that you would see my astute comment (IMNTBHO) as mockery!!

    While perhaps a tad extreme, it illustrates how post-modern thinking can be applied!

    But ignoring the deep hurt I now feel, there are a couple of points in your reply that do not stand up.

    First, is it smart or accurate to compare a herbivorous, "naturally-frightened-by-human presence" elk to an aggressive, carnivorous predator that sees you as a sweet meat?

    I call non sequitur.

    Second, I think my young, shepherd neighbour who has lost close to 2 dozen lambs to furry predators this year would resent being called an idiot.

    Finally, coyotes have few natural predators once they take up residence in a place like the numerous ravines of Toronto. Once peoples' little kitties and floor mops start getting stolen and eaten from the back deck, they tend to gain a more educated-by-realism view.

    Foxes I have no problem with. They are a farmer's friend, in my experience.

    Wolves and coyotes have proven themselves to be endlessly destructive, coast to coast.
    Do the elk in Banff seem particularly frightened of people to you? Even herbivores habituated to people have little fear of them.

    And how many coyotes do you tend to run into in a more natural habitat that could be considered aggressive towards people? Coyotes are generally much more skittish than those “naturally frightened by people herbivores”. How often do you see a coyote compared to a deer? The issue arises in that people have food for a coyote where deer are less often interested in what we have to offer. It is the habituated to people coyotes that start to see humans as a food source that this article is addressing. Stop the animals from seeing people as a source of food - be it eating us or eating our garbage - and make them wary of us again. Like their rural counterparts.

    As for your neighbour, I am a firm believer that there are many ways to manage livestock predation. Killing is a last resort. If someone is jumping straight to killing instead of trying to utilize other management practices then yes, I would consider them to be exercising their ability to be an idiot. Whether this applies to your neighbour or not, I really couldn’t say. And yes, I have experienced coyote predation on my livestock (my poor chickens!!) and have managed it accordingly with minimal shots fired.

    The entire purpose of this volunteer experiment is to see if making it less pleasant to live in an area where they’re harassed, deters the animals from being there and becoming pests. While it’s a sound practice utilized elsewhere, without eliminating the attractants to the animals in the first place, ie) garbage, pet food, etc, I’m not sure it will be terribly successful on its own.

    Either way, knowing the biology, nature and differences in the habitats of the animals, it’s not an unreasonable technique to apply. Rural people laughing at managing styles used in urban settings because they’d be unnecessary or ineffective in the country is some what hypocritical in the face of rural populations being upset at the attempts to manage our locations like we’re urban. What is effective and useful in urban areas is not always useful or effective in rural areas and vice versa. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Nov 24, 2020 | 15:05 18
    Quote Originally Posted by caseih View Post
    whats a good coyote hide fetching now , horse?
    shipped lots to dominion soudak as a kid , try to live and let live for the most part now
    unless forced to act
    Good western about $80 average,was a high seller $220, I averaged $64, a neibour $88 thats on about 65 hides I only sent 6.
    Now you need a licence and have to take a trapping course 4 days $400 so I wont be selling anymore just leave them where they fall,Cruel mabey but hard on the daughters sheep so have to shoot them.
    . Yes I used to sell to dominion also 30 yr ago got around 50$ ,wages were about $2/hr muskrats $6/$8 now rats averaged $2.37 wages $20 plus. Loved going rat hunting in spring as the rats flooded out,ah to be young again.
    Muskrats every where this yr,a kid could make a killing if they were worth what they used to be. Reply With Quote
  • 3 Likes


  • Nov 24, 2020 | 17:39 19
    Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
    Anything i say is usually after pulling the trigger.
    Right after the bang...

    Poor quality sound, turn it up to hear their discussion -



    Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • makar's Avatar Nov 24, 2020 | 18:49 20
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    Right after the bang...

    Poor quality sound, turn it up to hear their discussion -



    Don't get along in short pants, won't work in rosebushes. Reply With Quote
    Nov 24, 2020 | 21:54 21 Just call in a professional already
    Reply With Quote
    Nov 24, 2020 | 22:37 22 I always had coyote around but if they weren't bothersome I just let them be.
    Went with the theory if you don't have a killer leave them because you will always have some fill the territory if you shoot the ones there.
    I shot them at calving if they were up trying to get the afterbirth while the cow was mothering up.
    Coyotes arn't natural killers like wolves. Mostly scavengers and do clean up moles and mice in the bale yard.
    Can be a problem if you have a shit storm with a bunch of sick calves laying around.
    Not as bad as ravens and magpies and now turkey vultures.
    Just my opinion. Reply With Quote
    Nov 25, 2020 | 06:05 23
    Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
    Perhaps we should ask the wolves.
    Or consider the long domesticated cat playing with a mouse. No one can deny their instinct or nature.
    Funny that you should mention the cat n mouse thing - just a couple of days ago while chatting with a chap who stopped in, one of our very friendly barn cats was batting a mole around. It was a fascinating sight as he didn't seem to tire of it long after the thing lay there motionless.

    He would walk away from it, appearing to have lost interest, then suddenly come flying back and attack it harder than ever.

    We just stood there scratching our heads at its antics. He never did eat it.

    Then just yesterday while the cook was feeding the kitchen scraps to our herd of barn cats and kittens, she was confronted by a big, thick, sleek tom that was born here but spends most of his time prowling the 'hood.

    His grudging, growly attitude makes him act like he's got a chip embedded on his shoulder.

    She said that as she dumped the goodies in their dish, the growler sat hunched back, ears down and uttering the occasional unconvincing spitting sound.

    But what really put her off wasn't the ears pinned back on his fat head - it was the malevolent glare from those slitty yellow eyes.

    She said after that display of needless antagonism, she wouldn't like to meet the cougar that's been seen numerous times in a town nearby.

    And this big, arrogant rascal was born, raised and handled by our grandkids right here on this farm!!

    Cats are totally unpredictable and never to be trusted.

    For a fascinating read on the big cats of the West Coast, find a copy of Joe Garner's "Never a Time to Trust." Joe was a highly entertaining writer whose 5 books paint a riveting picture of life during the development the West Coast in the 20th century. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Nov 25, 2020 | 07:31 24 Cats all have personalities.

    I have a family here since someone got out of hand a couple summers ago... anyway, 1 a few months older from the first litter, 3 from the younger litter, and the mom are left.

    The mom and two boys are alright. Personable but not always in your face. The younger female is dumb as a fence post I swear. The oldest is a snake - and she’s my baby! She gives you fair warning when she doesn’t like something but she will follow it up with teeth if you don’t listen. She’s all attitude and fluff.

    If I were to meet a cougar I hope it’s not one with her personality! Maybe a Siamese, then you’d hear it coming. Reply With Quote