Test We are World Leaders in Energy Test

Commodity Marketing

Tools

We are World Leaders in Energy

Test
Klause's Avatar Oct 19, 2020 | 20:37 1 We need from start acting like it.


We're drilling 5500 meter wells in under a week.

We go to the craziest of places and do the most advanced procedures all over the world.


This is what makes wealth for the nation.



Not handling out $2000 cheques.


Reply With Quote
ajl
Oct 19, 2020 | 20:58 2 Hopefully these guys got $USD up front from the folks in India. Otherwise our technology will be doing some volunteering. Reply With Quote
Klause's Avatar Oct 19, 2020 | 21:06 3 Story from India.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.ndt...akamai-rum=off Reply With Quote
Oct 19, 2020 | 23:50 4 Wonder why Treudo didn't ban the flight. Would never make CBC. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Oct 20, 2020 | 00:00 5 5 months of letting that well rip. Now that is pollution There are probably better ways of controlling that than snubbing. If that was in this country there would have been a well drilled into that one to control it. Snubbing is not new. Reply With Quote
    Oct 20, 2020 | 07:06 6 Wealth can be created in a number of ways not just by the extraction of non renewable resources. When you use up non renewable resources you are drawing down the resource and jobs eventually disappear.

    Yes we have great technology and lots of valuable energy sources in fossil fuels, hydro, wind, geo-thermal, solar, tidal and hydrogen. Canada is blessed with a wealth of resources. Their use and implementation creates jobs and economic spinoffs.

    Many oil companies are diversifying because as we transition away from polluting and carbon emitting energy sources, oil prices are going to drop and leave us with stranded assets like the oil sands which become uneconomical.

    We are going to need fossil fuels for a long while yet, but the transition to cleaner low carbon energy sources will present many investment opportunities and many jobs. Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Oct 20, 2020 | 08:51 7 "Suddenly became active" means someone screwed up. There is a market for our people and tech for a long time yet.
    Or until our industry stagnates to the point we're outdated. Reply With Quote
    Oct 20, 2020 | 09:15 8
    Quote Originally Posted by Klause View Post
    We need from start acting like it.


    We're drilling 5500 meter wells in under a week.

    We go to the craziest of places and do the most advanced procedures all over the world.


    This is what makes wealth for the nation.
    Not handling out $2000 cheques.
    Like the kind of wealth Alberta is experiencing? Reply With Quote
    Klause's Avatar Oct 20, 2020 | 09:25 9
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Wealth can be created in a number of ways not just by the extraction of non renewable resources. When you use up non renewable resources you are drawing down the resource and jobs eventually disappear.

    Yes we have great technology and lots of valuable energy sources in fossil fuels, hydro, wind, geo-thermal, solar, tidal and hydrogen. Canada is blessed with a wealth of resources. Their use and implementation creates jobs and economic spinoffs.

    Many oil companies are diversifying because as we transition away from polluting and carbon emitting energy sources, oil prices are going to drop and leave us with stranded assets like the oil sands which become uneconomical.

    We are going to need fossil fuels for a long while yet, but the transition to cleaner low carbon energy sources will present many investment opportunities and many jobs.

    You sound like a Cbc parrot, Glenn.

    Highways need to be paved. Plastics need to be made. Fuel consumption might (and should) drop but that won't strand resources, because they are still needed.

    We're justing going to come up with novel tech to extract them profitably, because that's what the oil patch is known for.


    Best thing that can happen is Biden wins the US election. That'll put an end to fracking and freeze the US oil industry ... Price of crude will double overnight.


    The only way to gain foreign exchange and value to currency is by exporting the production of ag, fishing, forestry mining, and oil extraction. Everything except for primary production is simply moving the same dollar in a circle as opposed to giving a new dollar inherent value.


    Finally, if it is going to become a stranded asset as you say, shouldn't we turn it into wealth as fast as possible to capitalize on it before it becomes stranded? Reply With Quote

  • Oct 20, 2020 | 13:00 10 its like arguing with a doorknob
    hes a throwback from the dark days of the communist regime in Sask
    sat on too many boards and sold his voice for rooms and meals and per diem too many times
    basically unfixable , and we are surrounded by them Reply With Quote

  • Oct 21, 2020 | 07:28 11 Back to the speculating again? haahah

    Most of you are so obsessed with idea that only extracting finite resources is the only way to create wealth!

    Did you forget about Germany which has a very succesful economy. They are very successful at adding value to raw materials instead of just ripping and shipping raw materials.

    The economy of Germany is a highly developed social market economy.[20] It has the largest national economy in Europe, the fourth-largest by nominal GDP in the world, and fifth by GDP (PPP). In 2017, the country accounted for 28% of the euro area economy according to the IMF.[21] Germany is a founding member of the European Union and the Eurozone.[22][23]

    In 2016, Germany recorded the highest trade surplus in the world worth $310 billion,[24] making it the biggest capital exporter globally.[25] Germany is one of the largest exporters globally with $1448.17 billion worth of goods and services exported in 2017.[26][27][28] The service sector contributes around 70% of the total GDP, industry 29.1%, and agriculture 0.9%. Exports account for 41% of national output.[29][needs update][30] The top 10 exports of Germany are vehicles, machinery, chemical goods, electronic products, electrical equipment, pharmaceuticals, transport equipment, basic metals, food products, and rubber and plastics.[31] The economy of Germany is the largest manufacturing economy in Europe and it is less likely to be affected by the financial downturn[32] and conduct applied research with practical industrial value and sees itself as a bridge between the latest university insights and industry-specific product and process improvements, and by generating a great deal of knowledge in its own laboratories as well.[33] In July 2017, the International Monetary Fund gave the country's economy "yet another bill of good health" and some advice on steps it might take to maintain this level in the long run.[21]

    Germany is rich in timber, lignite, potash and salt. Some minor sources of natural gas are being exploited in the state of Lower Saxony. Until reunification, the German Democratic Republic mined for uranium in the Ore Mountains (see also: SAG/SDAG Wismut). Energy in Germany is sourced predominantly by fossil fuels (30%), followed by wind second, then nuclear power, gas, solar, biomass (wood and biofuels) and hydro.[34]

    Germany is the first major industrialized nation to commit to the renewable energy transition called Energiewende. Germany is the leading producer of wind turbines in the world.[35] Renewables produced 46% of electricity consumed in Germany (as of 2019).[36] 99 percent of all German companies belong to the German "Mittelstand," small and medium-sized enterprises, which are mostly family-owned. Of the world's 2000 largest publicly listed companies measured by revenue, the Fortune Global 2000, 53 are headquartered in Germany, with the Top 10 being Allianz, Daimler, Volkswagen, Siemens, BMW, Deutsche Telekom, Bayer, BASF, Munich Re and SAP.[37]
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Oct 21, 2020 at 07:30.
    Reply With Quote
    Klause's Avatar Oct 21, 2020 | 08:46 12
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Back to the speculating again? haahah

    Most of you are so obsessed with idea that only extracting finite resources is the only way to create wealth!

    Did you forget about Germany which has a very succesful economy. They are very successful at adding value to raw materials instead of just ripping and shipping raw materials.

    The economy of Germany is a highly developed social market economy.[20] It has the largest national economy in Europe, the fourth-largest by nominal GDP in the world, and fifth by GDP (PPP). In 2017, the country accounted for 28% of the euro area economy according to the IMF.[21] Germany is a founding member of the European Union and the Eurozone.[22][23]

    In 2016, Germany recorded the highest trade surplus in the world worth $310 billion,[24] making it the biggest capital exporter globally.[25] Germany is one of the largest exporters globally with $1448.17 billion worth of goods and services exported in 2017.[26][27][28] The service sector contributes around 70% of the total GDP, industry 29.1%, and agriculture 0.9%. Exports account for 41% of national output.[29][needs update][30] The top 10 exports of Germany are vehicles, machinery, chemical goods, electronic products, electrical equipment, pharmaceuticals, transport equipment, basic metals, food products, and rubber and plastics.[31] The economy of Germany is the largest manufacturing economy in Europe and it is less likely to be affected by the financial downturn[32] and conduct applied research with practical industrial value and sees itself as a bridge between the latest university insights and industry-specific product and process improvements, and by generating a great deal of knowledge in its own laboratories as well.[33] In July 2017, the International Monetary Fund gave the country's economy "yet another bill of good health" and some advice on steps it might take to maintain this level in the long run.[21]

    Germany is rich in timber, lignite, potash and salt. Some minor sources of natural gas are being exploited in the state of Lower Saxony. Until reunification, the German Democratic Republic mined for uranium in the Ore Mountains (see also: SAG/SDAG Wismut). Energy in Germany is sourced predominantly by fossil fuels (30%), followed by wind second, then nuclear power, gas, solar, biomass (wood and biofuels) and hydro.[34]

    Germany is the first major industrialized nation to commit to the renewable energy transition called Energiewende. Germany is the leading producer of wind turbines in the world.[35] Renewables produced 46% of electricity consumed in Germany (as of 2019).[36] 99 percent of all German companies belong to the German "Mittelstand," small and medium-sized enterprises, which are mostly family-owned. Of the world's 2000 largest publicly listed companies measured by revenue, the Fortune Global 2000, 53 are headquartered in Germany, with the Top 10 being Allianz, Daimler, Volkswagen, Siemens, BMW, Deutsche Telekom, Bayer, BASF, Munich Re and SAP.[37]


    Germany? Seriously. You're comparing Canada to Germany?

    That's equivalent to comparing Iceland to the United States.


    If you want us to be like Germany, the first thing we would need to do is scrap the entire education system.

    Germany creates its wealth from investment in highly technical training and a very rigid trades & skills system.

    Germany uses people (labour) to turn a raw product into something worth far more through science and innovation. They were forced to do this because they lack resources...



    If you want us to be like them you'd need to remove 2/3 of the "soft" skills in schools and focus completely on STEM.

    Then, you need to create the infrastructure in this country. High speed rail. High speed limited access freeways. National grids for gas, power (which would mean less ghg, too).


    Next, you need to create the ability, regulatory, and taxation systems to encourage and push private innovation... This doesn't mean the government has to fork money over. It means the environment has to be created and the services (such as testing services, datacenters, public access research facilities) need to be built, staffed, and funded.



    Unfortunately we're going backwards in that regard. Just look at what PAMI was and what they are now... They gave up their international accreditation so we can't even bring product to market through them and have to enlist TuV Sud to do certification work for us.


    When we actually do have an industry that is highly technical, that we are skilled in, and have an efficient work force for, the entire country tries to shut it down. We force the companies responsible to relocate taking the skilled people with them. We constrain their access to capital through virtue signaling in banking and funding. Our technical services and breakthroughs basically built the shale oil business in the USA and Argentina... Yet at home we've now made those trailblazers and industry leaders into pariahs


    Finally, access to capital... We don't have it. Germany does. The USA does. Capital is required for research and innovation and it needs to come from the market not taxpayers.



    Germany had oil at one point... They extracted every last drop of it.


    You didn't answer my question either... If we have a resource that soon won't be needed, as you claim:

    1. Do we take it out as fast as possible and use the money to create a new future (i.e sovereign wealth fund), or

    2. Leave it in the ground and never capitalize on it, just let it sit there unused.



    I can tell you which one Germany would do.


    And no, I'm not against green energy. I'm all for it. However I also know all the products petroleum goes into and those products are still needed.

    I'm also pro immigration, as long as we are bringing in highly skilled people that can hit the ground running, innovAte, create, and employ.


    Bringing in unskilled people is doing them a disservice (you can't be successful with a million dollar housing market and a high cost of living and working low wage jobs). It also dilutes the existing workforce's ability to innovate and be efficient.
    Last edited by Klause; Oct 21, 2020 at 08:54.
    Reply With Quote

  • blackpowder's Avatar Oct 21, 2020 | 09:10 13 Okay, you win. Klause for PM. Reply With Quote
    Oct 21, 2020 | 12:58 14 So why did so many Germans immigrate to Canada and are still coming?

    It was not a direct comparison. Germany is just an example of a country that has a strong economy without relying on large amounts of natural resources. Which flies in the face of the argument that “ only extracting natural resources is the only true wealth creation” . Which is bullshit! Reply With Quote
    Klause's Avatar Oct 21, 2020 | 20:40 15
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    So why did so many Germans immigrate to Canada and are still coming?

    Why do Canadians move to Germany?

    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    It was not a direct comparison. Germany is just an example of a country that has a strong economy without relying on large amounts of natural resources. Which flies in the face of the argument that “ only extracting natural resources is the only true wealth creation” . Which is bullshit!
    So.... We're not talking about Norway anymore?


    A "Services" economy just turns the same money, and as government prints more devalues the currency causing inflation. MMT doesn't work, and we will see that soon enough in Canada.


    In order to get foreign exchange (that is, other people's money in exchange for goods produced) you need to produce valuable content.... Grains, Lumber, Oil, Fish, Diamonds, Gold, Bismuth, Copper, Nickel, Water. All resources and all conjured into existence from nothing.



    **I did have a long reply written out, but I've decided to quit wasting time replying to you if you insist on being juvenile on here[Agriville].** Reply With Quote

  • Oct 22, 2020 | 07:38 16 Klause "In order to get foreign exchange (that is, other people's money in exchange for goods produced) you need to produce valuable content.... Grains, Lumber, Oil, Fish, Diamonds, Gold, Bismuth, Copper, Nickel, Water. All resources and all conjured into existence from nothing."

    Huh? Germany and several other countries have successful productive economies without relying on a very large primary resource sectors. Canada also has lots of manufacturing and value added industries.

    Norway is an example of a country that put a high value on planning and saving for the future when oil reserves run out. They are true fiscal conservatives! Something Canadians and especially Albertans should have paid attention to. Instead we have people who don't want to embrace inevitable change and want to cling to old ideas and failing industries.

    If you think it is a good idea to invest only in oil and gas go ahead there is nothing stopping you.
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Oct 22, 2020 at 07:51.
    Reply With Quote
    Oct 22, 2020 | 07:50 17 why don't you move to norway ? Reply With Quote
    Oct 22, 2020 | 07:51 18 Why dont you move to Alabama? LOL Reply With Quote
    Oct 22, 2020 | 07:54 19 Norway is a great country and so is Canada. I am happy here, unlike most of the mal contents on Agrisilly who will never be happy anywhere. Reply With Quote
    Klause's Avatar Oct 22, 2020 | 08:10 20
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Klause "In order to get foreign exchange (that is, other people's money in exchange for goods produced) you need to produce valuable content.... Grains, Lumber, Oil, Fish, Diamonds, Gold, Bismuth, Copper, Nickel, Water. All resources and all conjured into existence from nothing."

    Huh? Germany and several other countries have successful productive economies without relying on a very large primary resource sectors. Canada also has lots of manufacturing and value added industries.

    Norway is an example of a country that put a high value on planning and saving for the future when oil reserves run out. They are true fiscal conservatives! Something Canadians and especially Albertans should have paid attention to. Instead we have people who don't want to embrace inevitable change and want to cling to old ideas and failing industries.

    If you think it is a good idea to invest only in oil and gas go ahead there is nothing stopping you.

    Please show me one spot where I said anything about investing "only in oil".

    I believe I've listed a bunch of resources - both renewable and not.

    2/3rds of our manufacturing base that we have left is equipment and tools to service the resource, forestry, fishing, and AG sectors...

    Every industrialized nations dreams of having vast resources.

    Except people like you that would rather look a gift horse in the mouth. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Oct 22, 2020 | 23:38 21 He’s a waste of skin Klause. Don’t waste your time. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like