Trump approves Alberta-Alaska rail line

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Trump approves Alberta-Alaska rail line

Sep 26, 2020 | 12:59 1 Trump does more for Canada is his spare time than our retard in charge does in 5 yrs. Love it

Trump approves Alberta-Alaska rail line

The A2A line would transport oil, as well as grain, ore, and other containerized goods.
Last edited by jazz; Sep 26, 2020 at 13:08.
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  • Sep 26, 2020 | 13:17 2 Our twat is too busy destroying a nation, nation building is a thing of the past in Canada.

    God I wish we could get rid of that Trudeau Government cancer. Reply With Quote

  • Blaithin's Avatar Sep 26, 2020 | 13:24 3 Because the rail lines are so prompt and helpful now.

    There’s currently a shortage of cars of all sorts, as well as engines to pull them. Short line tracks are constantly being decommissioned due to this lack of equipment and inability to upkeep the tracks.

    But you think if we just stick a line from somewhere in Alberta to an Alaskan port it will magically be wonderful? Trump would have to pull stuff out of his butt for that to be true. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 13:40 4 Every farm should run with the bare minimum equipment, only one tractor, etc.

    See how efficient we become.

    We have Railway crossings we can barely drive across....suppose that's our fault too. Right of ways that were sterilized now nothing but Canada thistles, absinthe and everything else but grass growing.

    FÚCKING STUPID.

    Zero pride. Reply With Quote
  • 3 Likes


  • Sep 26, 2020 | 13:55 5
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Because the rail lines are so prompt and helpful now.

    There’s currently a shortage of cars of all sorts, as well as engines to pull them. Short line tracks are constantly being decommissioned due to this lack of equipment and inability to upkeep the tracks.

    But you think if we just stick a line from somewhere in Alberta to an Alaskan port it will magically be wonderful? Trump would have to pull stuff out of his butt for that to be true.
    Which begs the question again in a wide spaced country like ours why is there not more investment in rail? Oh ya if we do that we wouldn’t need the pipe line which has become more about pride to get it than practicality. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 14:15 6 Canada will neve grow without better rail networks....the fact the rail lines were tore out without a comprehensive study of changing farming practices is a history lesson we should learn from...


    To ignore the economics if rail in this country like we have under all parties is an embarrassment and nothing to take pride in...

    A country can not grow without it. .unless Toronto is a country upon itself Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Sep 26, 2020 | 14:16 7
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    But you think if we just stick a line from somewhere in Alberta to an Alaskan port it will magically be wonderful? Trump would have to pull stuff out of his butt for that to be true.
    Uhh its a Canadian company as the sponsor blaithin. Trump isnt building it. The economics were done 15 yrs ago.

    Why would you disparage a connection to the greater trading world? Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Sep 26, 2020 | 14:18 8 Come on Blaithin, get on the Trump train, you’ll enjoy the ride. Reply With Quote

  • Sep 26, 2020 | 14:21 9
    Quote Originally Posted by the big wheel View Post
    Which begs the question again in a wide spaced country like ours why is there not more investment in rail? Oh ya if we do that we wouldn’t need the pipe line which has become more about pride to get it than practicality.
    We need all modes of transport and export infrastructure. Rail, ports, pipelines, highways, airports, comm networks, elec lines.

    What we dont need is sustainable bike paths and green energy scams. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Sep 26, 2020 | 14:32 10
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    Canada will neve grow without better rail networks....the fact the rail lines were tore out without a comprehensive study of changing farming practices is a history lesson we should learn from...
    The CWB probably had more to do with the shortline abandonment than anything else. If you have restricted grain movement and apportioned sales, obviously something has to give. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 14:37 11
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    The CWB probably had more to do with the shortline abandonment than anything else. If you have restricted grain movement and apportioned sales, obviously something has to give.
    Actually the wheat board helped keep smaller lines running to accept grain from smaller elevators. It’s all run by the elevator companies now who don’t give a dam about small towns Reply With Quote

  • Sep 26, 2020 | 14:54 12
    Quote Originally Posted by the big wheel View Post
    Actually the wheat board helped keep smaller lines running to accept grain from smaller elevators. It’s all run by the elevator companies now who don’t give a dam about small towns
    Local Richardson, not.on my home town rail line, donated something like $15,000 to my community's rink. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Blaithin's Avatar Sep 26, 2020 | 14:57 13
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    Uhh its a Canadian company as the sponsor blaithin. Trump isnt building it. The economics were done 15 yrs ago.

    Why would you disparage a connection to the greater trading world?
    I only disparage your blind devotion to Trump. I have nothing against an additional rail line, however you do seem to have unrealistically high expectations of how it might improve things in Canada.

    Looking at the current state of rail lines and companies within the country, while this has potential, it’s hardly world altering.

    Also, just in case you failed to notice, we are already connected to the greater trading world. This line wouldn’t give us access to anything new. Or perhaps you think access to a port that isn’t even in the country will be much easier and more beneficial than using ports within the country. This could be a trial run for Wexiteers to see what exporting to a port would really entail. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 14:57 14
    Quote Originally Posted by the big wheel View Post
    Actually the wheat board helped keep smaller lines running to accept grain from smaller elevators. It’s all run by the elevator companies now who don’t give a dam about small towns
    "Move to the city Mr Farmer, we bought the Hyatt, you can stay there, safe injection site is on the same block, might be some protests on the way to get high but don't mind them, they are mostly peaceful, we have it all in utopia, you'll even get $2000/month". If this doesn't create an exodus to the suburbs like Rome, nothing will. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Sep 26, 2020 | 15:11 15
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Looking at the current state of rail lines and companies within the country, while this has potential, it’s hardly world altering.
    Please point out any other major export infrastructure projects close to being realized in this country?

    Its world altering for this country and yes having any choice in marketing is always a positive. I dont think any one involved in export activities would say less places to offshore our resources is better. You saw what happened when last winter when activist blocked the few locations we had. They wont be blocking anything in Alaska. Port workers wont be striking either.

    And maybe the greenies in lower mainland BC might notice when their port revenues start dwindling.

    A full 20% of our GDP is in the ag, mining, forestry and energy sectors and related activities and this project gives those resources a big boost.
    Last edited by jazz; Sep 26, 2020 at 15:16.
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    Sep 26, 2020 | 15:46 16
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Local Richardson, not.on my home town rail line, donated something like $15,000 to my community's rink.
    How much did that town loose in tax revenue when elevators were torn down, employees left and rail line was pulled? Bet loss was way more than $15,000 when you take in all costs now. Grin companies are making more now you can bet they didn't move for anything less than financial gain. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Sep 26, 2020 | 16:01 17
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    Please point out any other major export infrastructure projects close to being realized in this country?

    Its world altering for this country and yes having any choice in marketing is always a positive. I dont think any one involved in export activities would say less places to offshore our resources is better. You saw what happened when last winter when activist blocked the few locations we had. They wont be blocking anything in Alaska. Port workers wont be striking either.

    And maybe the greenies in lower mainland BC might notice when their port revenues start dwindling.

    A full 20% of our GDP is in the ag, mining, forestry and energy sectors and related activities and this project gives those resources a big boost.
    So you think companies like G3 and P&H who have new ports opened in BC this year, are going to invest in port facilities in Anchorage?

    Feasibly oil and mining companies can expand on their facilities there, but what’s up there to really boost grain exports. Load them straight into container trains, sure, but you think your terminals are picky now, wait until they need to meet specs for a container ship with no real port facility.

    As for protests... 3/4 of that line is in Canada. That’s a lot of area that could be blocked. Without bringing in the fact that, to get grain to Edmonton from the inland terminals you’re still using CN and CP lines (and cars) and are still dependent on their ability to move cars.

    Yes another line will be helpful, but more so for oil. Especially as it looks to go straight to Ft Mac. This is an alternative to the pipeline west. It’s boost for ag will be minimal with the possible exception of the northern terminals.

    After all, there’s nothing stopping the trains from going to the lower 48 and shipping out of ports there, other than the pain in the ass factor. How often do you hear about trains shipping stateside to get on a boat. Why not? Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 17:42 18
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Every farm should run with the bare minimum equipment, only one tractor, etc.

    See how efficient we become.

    We have Railway crossings we can barely drive across....suppose that's our fault too. Right of ways that were sterilized now nothing but Canada thistles, absinthe and everything else but grass growing.

    FÚCKING STUPID.

    Zero pride.
    i hope someone was fired over that, thistles 6' tall all along the lines, white fluff like a snow storm on the major highway next to the rail line. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Sep 26, 2020 | 17:50 19
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    So you think companies like G3 and P&H who have new ports opened in BC this year, are going to invest in port facilities in Anchorage?

    Feasibly oil and mining companies can expand on their facilities there, but what’s up there to really boost grain exports. Load them straight into container trains, sure, but you think your terminals are picky now, wait until they need to meet specs for a container ship with no real port facility.

    As for protests... 3/4 of that line is in Canada. That’s a lot of area that could be blocked. Without bringing in the fact that, to get grain to Edmonton from the inland terminals you’re still using CN and CP lines (and cars) and are still dependent on their ability to move cars.

    Yes another line will be helpful, but more so for oil. Especially as it looks to go straight to Ft Mac. This is an alternative to the pipeline west. It’s boost for ag will be minimal with the possible exception of the northern terminals.

    After all, there’s nothing stopping the trains from going to the lower 48 and shipping out of ports there, other than the pain in the ass factor. How often do you hear about trains shipping stateside to get on a boat. Why not?
    US port capacities usually booked up, CN / CP usually not all that friendly to send too many trains down south, switching lines / turn around time, etc, Pioneer, Cargill, VIT, PH, G3 etc want to ship grain to their terminals where the blending and elevation is earned. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 18:05 20
    Quote Originally Posted by MBgrower View Post
    US port capacities usually booked up, CN / CP usually not all that friendly to send too many trains down south, switching lines / turn around time, etc, Pioneer, Cargill, VIT, PH, G3 etc want to ship grain to their terminals where the blending and elevation is earned.
    Why do you farmers need grain companies? I remember during the CWB debate farmers were saying how they were going to load cars and trucks and sell south into their system and make so much money selling every thing as #1 at two or three times the price. Pull up a few old posts and have a look at what guys were saying. What changed or were the guys that were warning that it might not be so great or easy have a valid point. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 18:15 21
    Quote Originally Posted by MBgrower View Post
    i hope someone was fired over that, thistles 6' tall all along the lines, white fluff like a snow storm on the major highway next to the rail line.
    WTF do RM's have noxious weed bylaws for if they aren't going to enforce them?

    I talked to our Municipal Administrator about contacting other RMs that is sterilized CN right of way is in.

    This is the same RailCo that was causing the RM legal grief when they sent a train down the tracks without cleaning the crossing out of packed ice, snow and gravel, it derailed. Probably tried to blame the RM's cleaning procedure.

    So you can imagine the strained relationship. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Sep 26, 2020 | 18:17 22
    Quote Originally Posted by MBgrower View Post
    US port capacities usually booked up, CN / CP usually not all that friendly to send too many trains down south, switching lines / turn around time, etc, Pioneer, Cargill, VIT, PH, G3 etc want to ship grain to their terminals where the blending and elevation is earned.
    Exactly. So how is a port in Alaska going to be that much different? They want to send the grain to their port terminals where they can blend and clean it. They aren’t going to piss around with a far north container port that has them hobbled on handling and specs. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 18:18 23
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Local Richardson, not.on my home town rail line, donated something like $15,000 to my community's rink.
    15,000 is that it? They’ve fkd you over that much in one year.
    How about all us other guys have to truck 60 miles or more now with nothing local? That was supposed to be such a benefit now only certain terminals buy 1 wheat you have to beg them to buy 1 for 2 price just to get rid of the shit. Lmao Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 18:19 24
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    I only disparage your blind devotion to Trump. I have nothing against an additional rail line, however you do seem to have unrealistically high expectations of how it might improve things in Canada.

    Looking at the current state of rail lines and companies within the country, while this has potential, it’s hardly world altering.

    Also, just in case you failed to notice, we are already connected to the greater trading world. This line wouldn’t give us access to anything new. Or perhaps you think access to a port that isn’t even in the country will be much easier and more beneficial than using ports within the country. This could be a trial run for Wexiteers to see what exporting to a port would really entail.
    Exactly anybody thinking trump did this for our benefit has the best drugs in town going. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 19:08 25 How will Trudeau block this when he finds out it will benefit Alberta and all FARMERS??

    “The A2A line would transport oil, as well as grain, ore, and other containerized goods.”

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    Last edited by Oliver88; Sep 26, 2020 at 19:27.
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  • Sep 26, 2020 | 19:21 26 Does this have anything to do with the Transportation hub in Oyen announced back in 2017 that we couldn't live without. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Sep 26, 2020 | 19:28 27 Can anyone live without Oyen? Really. Reply With Quote
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  • Sep 26, 2020 | 19:32 28 Maybe they will have dedicated trains to move water to L.A. ?😊

    And most importantly, there can be a ton of snow, and it can get below -25 C where reliability and safety can be questioned.

    I think it’s a great move for everyone. Won’t be the last project that governments co-operate on (the great split?) Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 19:32 29
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Can anyone live without Oyen? Really.
    Only saw a map down as far as to Ft Mac never saw route from there on. Just wondering what ever became of the hub in Oyen if they were still working on it. Saw lots of pipe line work around there this summer. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2020 | 19:44 30
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaithin View Post
    Exactly. So how is a port in Alaska going to be that much different? They want to send the grain to their port terminals where they can blend and clean it. They aren’t going to piss around with a far north container port that has them hobbled on handling and specs.
    What you are talking about isnt a port or rail problem, its a monopoly problem. You think CN and CP will be allowed to haul oil and ore up there and then refuse grains? I dont think so.

    A private consortium owns churchill port and it gets grain now again.

    As we have seen with CWB, monopolies can be broken with legislation.

    I imagine that rail would have huge tourism opportunities as well. Makes more sense than a hyperloop between Calgary and Edmonton.
    Last edited by jazz; Sep 26, 2020 at 19:48.
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