A + W shift gears

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A + W shift gears

Sep 17, 2020 | 17:23 1 A+W's new TV ad is promoting grass fed beef in their burgers. The commercial shows a rancher from Ontario and Alberta with an explanation as to how cattle manure producers a better grass crop, as well how it increases organic matter in the soil.

The A +W ad is actually very educational and very positive for beef producers.

Maybe A+W read the Agriville thread several months ago complaining about their fake burgers, who knows it could have been a slow day in their head office and they needed some entertainment.

Great new commercial! Reply With Quote
Sep 17, 2020 | 17:47 2 It would be interesting to know which countries supply cattle to A&W and how the contract is worded with the producer regarding hormone free and grass fed cattle, maybe only a % of the cattle have to meet that standard . . . details are important. Reply With Quote
Sep 17, 2020 | 19:00 3 Lean grind comes from cull cows which are usually hormone free. At least here in Canada cows don’t get implants. Reply With Quote
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  • Sep 17, 2020 | 19:13 4 I never even tried a beyond meat burger. Reply With Quote
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  • ajl
    Sep 17, 2020 | 20:09 5
    Quote Originally Posted by rumrocks View Post
    It would be interesting to know which countries supply cattle to A&W and how the contract is worded with the producer regarding hormone free and grass fed cattle, maybe only a % of the cattle have to meet that standard . . . details are important.
    A & W is likely in the process of slowly shifting there supply chain to South American or NZ beef since you can graze to some extent there 12 months of the year. Always smell a rat with those guys. That is one major competitive disadvantage the Canadian cattle industry has. The grazing season is too short so you really can't supply true grass fed beef even if you would want to. Reply With Quote
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  • Sep 17, 2020 | 20:11 6 As a former grass farmer I support their approach. I may reconsider eating ther in light of this.

    It is a good ad despite the same little shyster rep for the company. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Sep 17, 2020 | 20:16 7
    Quote Originally Posted by ajl View Post
    A & W is likely in the process of slowly shifting there supply chain to South American or NZ beef since you can graze to some extent there 12 months of the year. Always smell a rat with those guys. That is one major competitive disadvantage the Canadian cattle industry has. The grazing season is too short so you really can't supply true grass fed beef even if you would want to.
    I believe most of their supply has usually been from New Zealand. It wouldn’t be a new development.

    That was one of the issues when they originally started down this road, they couldn’t find enough Canadian ranches to supply what they required. Initially I believe one large ranch in BC and a couple in Alberta maybe. Over the last decade trends have been changing and while many still buck the marketing scheme, many others have started taking advantage of it. It’s not surprising there are more producers now able to supply what A&W are looking for.

    Much like McDonalds and their VBP+, although they came about it from a different direction. Reply With Quote
    Sep 17, 2020 | 20:18 8 Maybe there’s a market for Mary Jane Grass-Fed beef? I think maybe so. Reply With Quote
    Sep 18, 2020 | 07:06 9 Lots of ranchers interested in regenerative ag and grass fed beef should find a market opportunity with supplying A and W. But changing comes hard for some people.

    The unfortunate reality is its hard to compete with regions that can have animals on grass 365 days per year. Reply With Quote
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  • ajl
    Sep 18, 2020 | 08:15 10 Hopefully global warming will allow for 365 day a year grazing here in western canuckistan. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar Sep 18, 2020 | 10:41 11
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Lots of ranchers interested in regenerative ag and grass fed beef should find a market opportunity with supplying A and W. But changing comes hard for some people.

    The unfortunate reality is its hard to compete with regions that can have animals on grass 365 days per year.
    Unless it’s written right into their standards, grass fed doesn’t tend to exclude feeds like hay, haylage, or silage. In fact, I’d say it’s likely a large portion of the NZ beef herd would be fed silage at some point due to being housed during wet winter weather.

    Realistically most farmers in Canada are probably quite close to being grass fed. It’s just the cheap feed grain that makes it easier to supplement with grain in winter rations instead of quality forage. A small amount of tweaking to practices like including more stockpiled grazing and a focus on forage quality could both be things that get cattle that one step closer to being grain free. A bit of a price boost to help compensate towards forage costs and away from feed grains would always help. (When wouldn’t a price boost help Hah)

    It’s actually quite shocking how some animals can fit into labels. I’ve seen “Natural Beef” that’s raised in the typical feedlot setting with very little difference besides what sort of implants and feed additives they get.
    Last edited by Blaithin; Sep 18, 2020 at 11:29.
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    Sep 18, 2020 | 10:47 12 I don’t see the difference in grazing or feeding a bale of hay for labeling or quality of meat? Is rhere?
    I do see the adding of growth hormones as a problem. Personally I don’t want it.
    If a beef is sick give it what it needs the alternative is cruelty otherwise slaughter it and dispose.
    Tried bison for first time and wow couldn’t believe how close to beef the taste was and supposedly good for iron cholesterol etc. They seem to have a good no chemical marketing thing going which was the reason I tried it.
    Still get my beef from neighbors that have what I prefer. Reply With Quote
    Sep 18, 2020 | 11:24 13
    Quote Originally Posted by ajl View Post
    A & W is likely in the process of slowly shifting there supply chain to South American or NZ beef since you can graze to some extent there 12 months of the year. Always smell a rat with those guys. That is one major competitive disadvantage the Canadian cattle industry has. The grazing season is too short so you really can't supply true grass fed beef even if you would want to.
    What do you think cows eat in the winter up here, snow?? Reply With Quote
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  • Sep 19, 2020 | 22:07 14 We have a very small pasture that the renter removed the cattle from today.. it is way too early to start feeding cattle. But what are they supposed to do? The native grass pastures are screwed, tame grass not much better. Even normal stocking rates were too high this year.

    So yup, Canada is not the place to promote "grass fed only beef" for A&W burgers from.

    Ultimately I guess hay was once grass.....

    Where's Grassfarmer? Reply With Quote
    Sep 19, 2020 | 22:23 15 There will be a lot of pairs on the market by the end of May if moisture conditions don't improve.

    You only need a gallon or two in the tank to start a crop, but you need the tank half full to grow grass. Reply With Quote
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  • Sep 19, 2020 | 22:25 16 Rain Forecast ——->Showers ——> Possible Sprinkles. Reply With Quote
    Sep 19, 2020 | 22:27 17
    Quote Originally Posted by sumdumguy View Post
    Rain Forecast ——->Showers ——> Possible Sprinkles.
    According to Lerner's pretty map.....we're on the edge of it again, got to keep the theme alive. Reply With Quote
    Sep 19, 2020 | 23:57 18 As far as I know, grass fed beef is not defined and regulated like organic is. So there is a fair amount of interpretation involved in what can be called grass fed.
    Hay, grain or corn silage, greenfeed, corn grazing etc. most definitely qualify as grass fed.
    As do sprouts from malting/
    As does sprouted grain. I met a couple who markets grass fed beef, but feeds them hand sprouted grain, which technically is grass instead of grain by someone definition. After learning about the manual labour involved in that process, they deserve to get a premium for their beef.
    From the point of view of the finished product, it matter most what the animal is finished with, rather than what they ate the rest of their lives, hence the term grass finished beef being almost interchangeable.
    Doesn't matter what the momma cow eats, feed the rest of the herd grain all winter, just not the calves.

    Chuck should be interested to learn that grass fed actually vastly inreases the methane emissions from digestions vs grain fed. But I'm sure there will be a tax to fix that coming soon to a farm near you. Reply With Quote
    Sep 20, 2020 | 01:17 19 Hey AB5 had opportunity to try a small cut of wagyu steak.

    Hopefully you don’t produce it don’t wanna offend found it disgusting like eating butter/fat with a bit of beef.

    Give me eye fillet or rump steak from Angus or Hereford any day.

    Even the super dry aged beef dunno was real good but not sure if better than something hung for standard 21 days

    Again probably showing I’m outdated, gotta eat latest new age stuff like tofu.........
    Last edited by malleefarmer; Sep 20, 2020 at 01:41.
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  • Sep 20, 2020 | 02:36 20
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    Hey AB5 had opportunity to try a small cut of wagyu steak.

    Hopefully you don’t produce it don’t wanna offend found it disgusting like eating butter/fat with a bit of beef.

    Give me eye fillet or rump steak from Angus or Hereford any day.

    Even the super dry aged beef dunno was real good but not sure if better than something hung for standard 21 days

    Again probably showing I’m outdated, gotta eat latest new age stuff like tofu.........
    Thx Mallee...

    Tried the 'new' Teen Burger'. Not impressed.
    1/3 smaller patty size. Very dry and bland.

    On the 'Grass Fed' disclaimers... there are enough exceptions allowed... that about any feed ration would be allowed... to stop the animal from being 'hungry'. Barley fed beef is excellent... and Canadian beef farmers grow the best beef when they finish their beef with barley.

    I am old school too... this new A&W 'gimmick' is more deceptive than the last one... and just means less Canadian beef of lower quality goes into A&W burgers... they are now bland, and; Mac's, Wendy's, Harvey's Burger King, and DQ, all taste better... at less cost. The experence was disappointing.

    Cheers!
    Last edited by TOM4CWB; Sep 20, 2020 at 02:41.
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  • Sep 20, 2020 | 03:09 21 Don’t do burgers often mostly home made ground beef make your own bit of egg flour pepper spice done.

    How did I get Waygu got it via a friend had some to try if they wanted to put it On there menu in steak restaurant asked me to try it got about 2 mouthfuls obscencecthink it was $400 per kilo they passed on getting it peoplecwont pay that in a mid range steak restaurant diner more the $ 25 to 40 range per steak

    Getting older fussier prefer to buy a side of beef get it cut how I want cook it how I want rather than restaurants.

    Wife and I like it rare so it just bellows when ya cut it son and kids well done burnt blah Reply With Quote
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  • Sep 20, 2020 | 09:14 22 Had a corn fed steak in the US a few years ago, I prefer the barley finished, more flavor IMO. Reply With Quote