Weed................

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Weed................

Aug 6, 2020 | 23:55 1 Needed a catchy title 😉

Seems that in our neighbourhood a new weed shows up every couple of years. Always appears to be a challenge to deal with until you find a method to control it or you become blind to noticing it as much.



Latest arrival is Burdock. A biennial that grows 6-9 feet tall and loves hay and pasture fields. The seeds have Velcro like hooks and stick to anything. The 3” stalk is too tough to break or pull but the chainsaw does the trick.

Curious what odd and unusual specimens everyone else has and which is the most problematic?

P.S. Poplars are the biggest nuisance weed for us.

Random thoughts as the wind blows in another storm............... Reply With Quote
Aug 7, 2020 | 00:56 2 Scentless Chamomile is our arch nemesis. Tough as nails and always spreading in the alfalfa

Dad wants to get sheep to graze it! Reply With Quote
AllisWD45's Avatar Aug 7, 2020 | 07:42 3
Quote Originally Posted by woodland View Post
Needed a catchy title 😉

Seems that in our neighbourhood a new weed shows up every couple of years. Always appears to be a challenge to deal with until you find a method to control it or you become blind to noticing it as much.



Latest arrival is Burdock. A biennial that grows 6-9 feet tall and loves hay and pasture fields. The seeds have Velcro like hooks and stick to anything. The 3” stalk is too tough to break or pull but the chainsaw does the trick.

Curious what odd and unusual specimens everyone else has and which is the most problematic?

P.S. Poplars are the biggest nuisance weed for us.

Random thoughts as the wind blows in another storm...............
Try and keep the cows away from that shit when it matures. They will spread it to every acre you graze plus every pen and working chute etc. If you keep at it and catch it early you can get it under control. Cows love grazing it when it is really small. I always carried pruning sheers in truck and on Quad and just cut them down whenever i saw them. Waterways will spread them for miles before you know it. They are no fun when they start spreading. Reply With Quote
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  • biglentil's Avatar Aug 7, 2020 | 07:44 4 Pull it harvest the root and give it to someone who has cancer or maybe even covid might save their life.



    'Burdock root, as it turns out, may not only*purify the blood. It may also*inhibit certain types of cancer. The 2011 study also found that burdock seeds had “potent inhibitory effects” on the growth of tumors caused by cancers like pancreatic carcinoma.'
    Last edited by biglentil; Aug 7, 2020 at 07:50.
    Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 7, 2020 | 07:56 5 Group one resistant wild oats
    Cleavers, never used to have them.
    Hemp nettle an old problem flushing weed.
    Round Leaf Mallow
    Narrow Leafed HawksBeard

    Haven't had Scentless Chamomile or Leafy Source establish yet but both are too close for comfort.

    Thistles used to be a huge problem but are under "control". But as always there's always something new to fill the void.

    A real good way to adopt some new weeds is renting land from where they can be introduced to the home base. Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 7, 2020 | 08:21 6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ache4Acres View Post
    Scentless Chamomile is our arch nemesis. Tough as nails and always spreading in the alfalfa

    Dad wants to get sheep to graze it!
    Our ground is loaded with daisy (scentless chamomile) seed and it’ll grow anywhere that’s disturbed. Usually one or two cuts of hay take care of it though.

    White ****le in the pasture and hay doesn’t seem to mind getting mowed and just keeps coming back. Kinda like common tansy too Reply With Quote
    Aug 7, 2020 | 08:22 7
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Group one resistant wild oats
    Cleavers, never used to have them.
    Hemp nettle an old problem flushing weed.
    Round Leaf Mallow
    Narrow Leafed HawksBeard

    Haven't had Scentless Chamomile or Leafy Source establish yet but both are too close for comfort.

    Thistles used to be a huge problem but are under "control". But as always there's always something new to fill the void.

    A real good way to adopt some new weeds is renting land from where they can be introduced to the home base.
    Took over some land this spring, had a flush of group 2 resistant cleavers literally like a carpet from corner to corner
    Thankful for clever .... absolutely took them out
    Will have to watch that land for the next few years very carefully. Reply With Quote
    Aug 7, 2020 | 08:25 8
    Quote Originally Posted by AllisWD45 View Post
    Try and keep the cows away from that shit when it matures. They will spread it to every acre you graze plus every pen and working chute etc. If you keep at it and catch it early you can get it under control. Cows love grazing it when it is really small. I always carried pruning sheers in truck and on Quad and just cut them down whenever i saw them. Waterways will spread them for miles before you know it. They are no fun when they start spreading.
    Pruning shears are a good idea. I was thinking of a squirt bottle or small hand sprayer to carry in the gator with some grazon or such to spot spray too. Reply With Quote
    Aug 7, 2020 | 08:30 9
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Took over some land this spring, had a flush of group 2 resistant cleavers literally like a carpet from corner to corner
    Thankful for clever .... absolutely took them out
    Will have to watch that land for the next few years very carefully.
    By declaring war on cleavers they can be brought down to manageable levels after a few years.
    However they will do well around bluffs and slough edges so need to watch those areas.

    Roundleaf mallow seed is good for 50-100 years.

    Absinthe is a weed that needs your undivided attention too Reply With Quote
    Aug 7, 2020 | 08:43 10 We had a problem with scentless chamomile (also called May weed?) in the yard of an abandoned farmstead yard site (now pasture). They had been planted in the garden. Picked it for years and years. Always in full bloom. The whole plant would go into a plastic bag, closed and set in the sun to 'cook'. Only way to kill the seeds from what I understand. This is an incredible year for weeds in our area. We have had an invasion of tall buttercup that came in from the ditch. Reply With Quote
    Aug 7, 2020 | 09:17 11
    Quote Originally Posted by biglentil View Post
    Pull it harvest the root and give it to someone who has cancer or maybe even covid might save their life.



    'Burdock root, as it turns out, may not only*purify the blood. It may also*inhibit certain types of cancer. The 2011 study also found that burdock seeds had “potent inhibitory effects” on the growth of tumors caused by cancers like pancreatic carcinoma.'
    Our farm holds the cure for a lot of ills, then...

    It's a bugger to control. Was much less of a problem when the whole place was fenced ad either grazed or in hay. The cows would be grazing over all the land on alternate years and provided amazing weed control. Even Canada thistle, but not bull thistles. :-I.

    Since I've gone back to mostly cropping again, the fences, flats and otherwise uncropped acres are growing a lot of nasty stuff. Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Aug 7, 2020 | 09:36 12 Toadflax here has been a problem, and Canada thistle and dandelion, maybe not exciting as they are so common but boy they can spread where they are hard to control.


    Never had clevers till I grew liberty link canola for the first time about 15 yrs ago. White ****le seems to come in the forage seed. Thanks for that seed companies.

    I don't do much custom work but when I do it is interesting to see the different weed spectrums. Varies a lot farm to farm. Reply With Quote
    Aug 7, 2020 | 10:57 13
    Quote Originally Posted by GDR View Post
    Toadflax here has been a problem, and Canada thistle and dandelion, maybe not exciting as they are so common but boy they can spread where they are hard to control.


    Never had clevers till I grew liberty link canola for the first time about 15 yrs ago. White ****le seems to come in the forage seed. Thanks for that seed companies.

    I don't do much custom work but when I do it is interesting to see the different weed spectrums. Varies a lot farm to farm.
    Custom work - the best way to bring everyone else's problem back home.

    Was running grain buggy for a custom operator one time and there was a telltale pattern of American Nightshade in his own soybean field at the entrance to one of his farms. Free trucking on that stuff. Reply With Quote