Violence by far-right is among US’s most dangerous terrorist threats, study finds

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Violence by far-right is among US’s most dangerous terrorist threats, study finds

Jun 27, 2020 | 06:50 1 https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...hreat-analysis


Violence by far-right is among US’s most dangerous terrorist threats, study finds

Center for Strategic and International Studies analysis of domestic terrorist incidents found majority have come from far right

Jason Wilson
@jason_a_w

Sat 27 Jun 2020 10.00 BST

Violence by far-right groups and individuals has emerged as one of the most dangerous terrorist threats faced by US law enforcement and triggered a wave of warnings and arrests of people associated with those extremist movements.

The most recent in-depth analysis of far-right terrorism comes from the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).

In a report released last week, the Escalating Terrorism Problem in the United States, CSIS analyses 25 years of domestic terrorism incidents and finds that the majority of attacks and plots have come from the far right.

The report says “the majority of all terrorist incidents in the United States since 1994, and the total number of rightwing attacks and plots has grown significantly during the past six years”, with the far right launching two-thirds of attacks and plots in 2019, and 90% of those in 2020.

The report adds: “Far-right terrorism has significantly outpaced terrorism from other types of perpetrators.” The second most significant source of attacks and plots in the US has been “religious extremists”, almost all “Salafi jihadists inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaida”.
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The report shows the far left has been an increasingly negligible source of attacks since the mid 2000s. At that time the FBI defined arsons and other forms of property damage as domestic terrorism during a period some have called the “Green Scare”.

The CSIS study came during a new wave of terror attacks and plots from white supremacist and anti-government extremists.

Last Monday, the Department of Justice announced that it had brought an array of charges, including terrorism related offenses, against a US army soldier who subscribed to a mix of white supremacist and satanist beliefs which are characteristic of so-called “accelerationist” neo-nazis like Atomwaffen Division.

Last week, federal charges were brought on Steven Carillo for the murder of a federal security officer and a sheriff’s deputy. Like the three men arrested for an alleged terror plot in Nevada earlier this month, the FBI says Carillo identified with the extreme anti-government “boogaloo” movement, which is principally concerned with removing government regulation of firearms.

But critics question the timing and motivations of the intelligence community’s pivot to combatting rightwing extremism as it comes at a time when some are arguing the legal and institutional counterterrorism apparatus developed to combat overseas terror groups should now be adapted to domestic extremists.

For some that has deep implications for civil liberties and constitutional rights, especially when it comes to suggestions that new laws should be drafted to certify such groups as domestic terrorist organizations.

Eric Ward, executive director of the civil rights nonprofit the Western States Center, said: “We are deeply concerned by the idea of any type of law that creates a legal definition around domestic terrorism. There are significant laws already on the books that meet the challenges of this moment.”

Ward said that rather than new laws, “we need a responsible leadership that is actually willing to use the tools that are already on hand”.

Ward added: “Too often we have to respond to political crisis with criminalization. And I think that is a mistake”.

But the push for new laws is an ongoing one.

In April, a joint report from George Washington University’s Program on extremism (GWU PoE) and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) included a proposal for a “rights protecting domestic terrorism statute”. They said the law could provide “more tools for the investigation and prosecution of groups and individuals” associated with rightwing extremism.

The report did acknowledge “significant constitutional questions” would be raised by such a statute, and the possibility of “unintended consequences, particularly for members of minorities”.

There are also concerns around the creation of a surveillance state.

The GWU/ADL proposal called for increased information sharing between law enforcement agencies, increased data collection and increased resourcing.

Similar arguments have been made by influential legal and national security academics, national security nonprofits and policy shops.

Congressman Max Rose, a New York Democrat, has gone further in calling for the formal designation of US-based groups with international connections as Foreign Terror Organizations.

The FBI, meanwhile, is increasingly prepared to make comparisons between right wing extremists and Islamist terror groups.

Seth Jones, the lead author of the CSIS report, offered qualified support for the formal designation of terror groups, saying: “I still think it’s important to think through the first amendment implications and other pros and cons. But I do support taking a serious look at designation.”

Designation could open the way, he said, to also investigating people who support such groups without having formal membership in any.

But critics are alarmed by what they see as the application of ideas derived from the “war on terror” to domestic extremists.

Mike German, Brennan Center fellow, is a former FBI agent who investigated rightwing extremists but is now focused on law enforcement and intelligence oversight and reform. He sees arguments for domestic terror statutes as part of a broader reorientation of the “national security establishment” away from conflicts in the Middle East.

German attributes this move to a realization “that Isis and al-Qaida were were not as threatening to Americans as they had been, and that foreign counter-terrorism in general was sort of running out of steam”.

German said: “It’s a way of expanding the target realm that gives the counterterrorism enterprise targets that they can use to to get statistical accomplishments, rather than looking at whether or not the violence itself is reduced.”

German has argued federal authorities should prioritize the investigation of the violent crimes of far right extremists, and call them terrorist acts where appropriate, but that they should be prosecuted using existing laws, with a consideration of alternative responses like restorative justice.

He added: “When I worked these cases in the 1990s, no one suggested that we didn’t have sufficient legal authority.” Reply With Quote
Jun 27, 2020 | 07:00 2 The above message proudly sponsored by Antifa. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 27, 2020 | 08:52 3 Oh no, not the big scary Antifa again. Say Braveheart you still haven't provided any proof that Antifa was behind the destruction and looting during the BLM protests as you claimed. Still waiting. And now you are also going to have to counter this Washington Post fact check:

    The “antifa” artifice peddled by Trump and Barr
    Days after George Floyd was killed and protests broke out in Minneapolis, President Trump claimed “antifa” forces were behind some of the headline-grabbing instances of rioting and looting that followed.
    He has repeated this claim nearly 20 times. Online activists and prominent right-wing Twitter personalities promoted the theory. The nation’s top law enforcement officials, including Attorney General William Barr, appeared to confirm it.
    There’s just one problem with these claims: a total lack of evidence.
    The Fact Checker video team spoke to witnesses and reviewed arrest records, federal charges, intelligence reports, online conversations and dozens of videos and photos of violent incidents from the early days of protests in Minneapolis to determine whether a coordinated “antifa” campaign was responsible for the violence.
    Not a single confirmed case has emerged in which someone who self-identifies as “antifa” led violent acts at the protests. Trump administration officials say they have evidence, but they clammed up when we asked to see it, and the intelligence reports and other records indicate the opposite.
    We awarded Four Pinocchios to Trump. Reply With Quote

  • blackpowder's Avatar Jun 27, 2020 | 09:36 4 I think Loki is laughing at us all.

    Our need to feel safer in a group.
    Our need for labels/pigeonholes to fit in the group. Our elliptical orbit with authoritarianism. The need for puritanical leadership paid for with blindness.
    On which hill do the righteous here care to end their bloodline.
    Tyr is always waiting.

    Just thought I'd boil it down to basics. Ya'll are way too serious/self impotent. Reply With Quote
    Jun 27, 2020 | 09:47 5 Chuck, it is good to see that you have tied up all the loose ends in all the other threads before starting a new thread. Your expertise is being sought after in nearly every thread lately on a diverse range of matters, posters keep specifically asking for your opinion. How did you find the time to start yet another thread while simultaneously researching answers in every other thread? I admire your hard work and dedication. I trust the responses are still forthcoming in all previous threads with unanswered questions directed your way? Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jun 27, 2020 | 10:22 6 What a load of garbage you guys swallow. Like the KKK has ever taken over a city before.

    You think some rag tag kids with cell phones can occupy a downtown? There is money and huge organization behind it. Some have been interviewed and admitted it and being paid too. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Jun 27, 2020 | 11:27 7
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    What a load of garbage you guys swallow. Like the KKK has ever taken over a city before.

    You think some rag tag kids with cell phones can occupy a downtown? There is money and huge organization behind it. Some have been interviewed and admitted it and being paid too.
    -Tulsa 1921.
    -Buffalo 1921
    -"In 1924 the Klan succeeded in engineering the elections of officials from coast to coast, including the mayors of Portland, Maine, and Portland, Oregon. In some states, such as Colorado and Indiana, they placed enough Klansmen in positions of power to effectively control the state government. Known as the "Invisible Empire," the KKK's presence was felt across the country."https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexp...es/flood-klan/
    -Leitch, 2013
    -Fairview township 2014

    Jazz's alternate facts wrong again. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jun 27, 2020 | 12:03 8 Yeah dml, we are in the modern era now. Any recollection what was done under Nazi germany or Stalinist russia or Maoist china? All left wing idioleolgies and atrocities.

    Right wing hate or violence is a miniscule portion of this worlds problem.

    Why dont you just admist you dont like nationalism and you equate that with hate because it works better for dog whistle media narratives and easier to whip up some TDS. Reply With Quote
    Jun 28, 2020 | 08:50 9 A look back at the history of the KKK.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ku_Klux_Klan_in_Canada

    Westward expansion

    In 1926, American Ku Klux Klan organizers Hugh Finlay Emmons and Lewis A. Scott from Indiana established a Klan organization in Saskatchewan.[16] They spent most of early 1927 travelling throughout the province, establishing local Klan branches and selling memberships for C$13 per individual.[19] They also spread Klan propaganda and burned crosses, and in July and August 1927 they made another tour of the province.[19]
    John James Maloney (left) worked to revive the Ku Klux Klan in Saskatchewan after Hugh Finlay "Pat" Emmons (right) and Lewis A. Scott fled the province with the organization's money.

    Soon after, they fled Saskatchewan with the funds they had raised, leaving the Ku Klux Klan floundering.[19] Hawkins and John James Maloney, a seminarian from Hamilton who denounced Romanism, moved to Saskatchewan to revive the organization.[19][20] Under his leadership, the organization raised over C$50,000 in membership fees and claimed to have registered over 70,000 members.[19] Fees were set at $15 per member annually.[21] Many of its members were supporters of the Conservative Party of Saskatchewan frustrated with the success of the Liberal Party as a result of strong support from Catholics.[22]
    All our troubles, all the sedition, plotting and plans against the national school system are hatched in Quebec.


    —Reverend S. P. Rondeau, 10 January 1929[23]

    Under the leadership of Hawkins and Maloney, the Klan became increasingly anti-Catholic and anti-French, and campaigned against the separate school system[19] with the slogan "one nation, one flag, one language, one school".[24] They opposed "crucifixes on public school walls, nuns teaching in public schools, and the teaching of French in public schools", blaming these issues on Quebec.[25] (The Constitution Act, 1867 guaranteed provincial rights to education and language, protecting minority rights, including those of Catholics and French-speaking citizens.) At a meeting of the Ku Klux Klan on 10 January 1929 at the Regent Hall in Saskatoon, reverend S.P. Rondeau stated that Quebec was attempting to establish Saskatchewan as a second French-speaking province.[23] Newly founded local chapters would announce their presence to the community with a ritual cross burning.[26]
    The Imperial Palace of the Kanadian Knights of Ku Klux Klan in British Columbia

    This became an issue in the 1929 provincial election, ultimately resulting in a coalition government led by James Thomas Milton Anderson of the Conservatives after the Liberals failed to form a minority government. The Ku Klux Klan would appear at many election rallies for James Garfield Gardiner, burning crosses.[21] Gardiner accused Anderson and the Conservatives of being associated with the Ku Klux Klan or seeking its support, but never provided proof.[21] Klan membership included Conservatives, Liberals, and Progressives,[26] and the provincial treasurer ("Klabee") was Walter Davy Cowan, Conservative Party of Canada Member of Parliament for Long Lake during the 17th Canadian Parliament from 1930 to 1935.[27] Once they formed the government, the Conservatives condemned the Ku Klux Klan, but their opponents persisted in linking them to the organization until the 1934 provincial election.[21] The Conservative government amended the School Act to ban the display of religious insignia in educational settings, and also amended the provincial immigration policy.[26] The government also terminated recognition of teaching certificates granted by Quebec, effectively halting the recruitment of teachers from that province.[28]


    Alberta

    Maloney married Leorna Miller, the daughter of William Willoughby Miller who was a Member of the Legislative Assembly for Biggar during the 7th Saskatchewan Legislature led by Anderson.[29] In his book Rome in Canada he states that the Anderson government forgot him, and "in their pride and conceit" took credit for much of his effort.[29] Bitter at the rejection, he made visits to Ontario then moved to Alberta in 1930, and spoke at 20 engagements that spring at the request of Orange Lodge Grand Master A.E. Williams.[29] Finding competition against William Aberhart ("Bible Bill") in Calgary difficult, he moved to Edmonton, which he stated was the "Rome of the West" because of its many Roman Catholic properties.[29]

    He restored the Alberta Ku Klux Klan, which had been established in 1923 but was poorly organized and managed. He declared himself the Imperial Wizard, and sent for experienced Klan organizers from British Columbia and Saskatchewan.[29] Travelling to as many as five engagements a day in rural areas to establish Klaverns and collect C$13 membership fees, the Klan sometimes encountered strong opposition, requiring police protection at Gibbons and Stony Plain, facing a volley of thrown rocks at Chauvin, and prevented from disembarking a train at Wainwright.[29]

    The Klan celebrated the 1931 election of Edmonton mayor Dan Knott by burning a cross. On two occasions, Knott granted the Klan permission to hold gatherings and erect burning crosses on the Edmonton Exhibition grounds, now known as Northlands. The Klan published a newspaper The Liberator in downtown Edmonton during the early 1930s.[30] Klan meetings were held in the Memorial Hall of the Royal Canadian Legion in Edmonton.[31]

    The Ku Klux Klan received its charter in September 1932, but questions about the organization's funds led to disputes about Maloney's leadership.[29] On 25 January 1933, he was convicted of stealing legal documents from the office of a lawyer who had opposed incorporation of the Ku Klux Klan, and on 3 February he was convicted of insurance fraud.[29]

    The downfall of Maloney was chiefly responsible for the discontinuation of the Ku Klux Klan in Alberta.[29] Reply With Quote
    Jun 28, 2020 | 08:59 10
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    Chuck, it is good to see that you have tied up all the loose ends in all the other threads before starting a new thread. Your expertise is being sought after in nearly every thread lately on a diverse range of matters, posters keep specifically asking for your opinion. How did you find the time to start yet another thread while simultaneously researching answers in every other thread? I admire your hard work and dedication. I trust the responses are still forthcoming in all previous threads with unanswered questions directed your way?
    Whats wrong A5, you can't keep up? You sound bitter again. Are you regressing into talking about me instead of the issue again! LOL

    Did you read the Truth and Reconciliation report and the MMIW report yet? A lot of the answers about FN you seek, are found in both reports.

    Flea has already admitted that treating everyone with the respect regardless of skin colour and ethnic origin, religion etc..has not negatively affected him. How about you? Reply With Quote
    Jun 28, 2020 | 16:29 11 Good shot white versus white no disclaimer needed

    https://twitter.com/ritapanahi/statu...595649025?s=21 Reply With Quote
    Jun 28, 2020 | 16:36 12
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Whats wrong A5, you can't keep up? You sound bitter again. Are you regressing into talking about me instead of the issue again! LOL

    Did you read the Truth and Reconciliation report and the MMIW report yet? A lot of the answers about FN you seek, are found in both reports.

    Flea has already admitted that treating everyone with the respect regardless of skin colour and ethnic origin, religion etc..has not negatively affected him. How about you?
    No, just offering some helpful advice, that if you want to earn credibility ( just like suggested in another thread regarding respect, both have to be earned), not running away from uncomfortable questions every time they come up, would work wonders.

    If you don't think that credibility is important, then carry on as is, but you are investing a massive amount of time for absolutely no results. The ROI on your efforts is not good. Perhaps quality over quantity would be a better approach. Finish one issue before moving on to another. Almost every other thread has someone asking you for an answer, and instead, you start another thread on another topic, rather than support your argument.

    Not all of us are dead set in our ways, and cannot be convinced if presented with facts that contradict our biases. You throw out some baseless insinuations, then, instead of defending them when we question them, you throw out some insults and childish name calling, then run away and start a new thread. If you think that you have the not only the moral high ground, but also the facts on your side, then stick with it, and defend your position. You might yet make some converts to your way of thinking. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Jun 28, 2020 | 16:55 13 The KKK is a total extremist group . To bring that up up here on Agriville insinuating farmers on here is absolutely ridiculous and sad
    Antifa is actually more extreme and more relevant today because they are causing more grief in the US right now than any other single “group”
    Antifa is real , and a serious threat to society, look at Seattle, and many other cities in the US .
    The people causing all the shiti the US are certainly not farmers , most likely 99% urban extremists left and right .
    To again try to label farmers as KKK or whatever label is a seriously flawed and ignorant thing
    But you are doing it daily .
    Like calling virtually all us farmers here on Agriville and for the most part everyone other far left farmers racists is sooo wrong it’s on the verge of defamation. You need to tone it down
    It’s wrong period
    It’s just because we don’t accept 100% of you idealistic world chuck and you are the problem Reply With Quote

  • Jun 28, 2020 | 17:30 14
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    The KKK is a total extremist group . To bring that up up here on Agriville insinuating farmers on here is absolutely ridiculous and sad
    Antifa is actually more extreme and more relevant today because they are causing more grief in the US right now than any other single “group”
    Antifa is real , and a serious threat to society, look at Seattle, and many other cities in the US .
    The people causing all the shiti the US are certainly not farmers , most likely 99% urban extremists left and right .
    To again try to label farmers as KKK or whatever label is a seriously flawed and ignorant thing
    But you are doing it daily .
    Like calling virtually all us farmers here on Agriville and for the most part everyone other far left farmers racists is sooo wrong it’s on the verge of defamation. You need to tone it down
    It’s wrong period
    It’s just because we don’t accept 100% of you idealistic world chuck and you are the problem
    Excellent post Furrow.
    And then Chuck goes on a rant about other people making broad generalizations. Reply With Quote
    fjlip's Avatar Jun 28, 2020 | 20:00 15 KKK, Democrats/leftist/liberals...

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    Jun 28, 2020 | 20:32 16
    Quote Originally Posted by fjlip View Post
    KKK, Democrats/leftist/liberals...
    Well if by your logic the KKK are democrats/leftist/liberals in the states because of history, then you must also believe that Saskatchewan Conservatives are the foundation of KKK in Canada. From Wikipedia:

    One of the most prominent groups was the Ku Klux Klan of Kanada, whose main principles of white supremacy and nationalism required members to pledge that they were white, gentile, and Protestant.[11] Organizers stated that the Ku Klux Klan was a Christian organization with "first allegiance to Canada and the Union Jack", disqualifying Jews from membership because they are not Christian, and Roman Catholics because their first allegiance is to the Pope in Rome.[14]

    Although the KKK operated throughout Canada, it was most successful in Saskatchewan, where by the late 1920s its membership was over 25,000.[11] Historian Allan Bartley states that this success was a result of opposition to liberal Government of Saskatchewan policy established by the entrenched Saskatchewan Liberal Party, which had held power in the province since its inception in 1905.[11] Reply With Quote
    fjlip's Avatar Jun 28, 2020 | 21:16 17 NO I do not believe it...maybe those were the future CCF'ers? Tommy people... Reply With Quote
    Jun 29, 2020 | 06:28 18
    Quote Originally Posted by fjlip View Post
    NO I do not believe it...maybe those were the future CCF'ers? Tommy people...
    Interesting that you can post a few pictures and statements that seem to tie Democrats to the KKK yet when I post documentation tying the KKK to Saskatchewan Conservatives from the same time period you refuse to believe it. Maybe I just never gave enough information. Here is some more information about the link from the same article:

    "In 1926, American Ku Klux Klan organizers Hugh Finlay Emmons and Lewis A. Scott from Indiana established a Klan organization in Saskatchewan.[16] They spent most of early 1927 travelling throughout the province, establishing local Klan branches and selling memberships for C$13 per individual.[19] They also spread Klan propaganda and burned crosses, and in July and August 1927 they made another tour of the province.[19]

    Soon after, they fled Saskatchewan with the funds they had raised, leaving the Ku Klux Klan floundering.[19] Hawkins and John James Maloney, a seminarian from Hamilton who denounced Romanism, moved to Saskatchewan to revive the organization.[19][20] Under his leadership, the organization raised over C$50,000 in membership fees and claimed to have registered over 70,000 members.[19] Fees were set at $15 per member annually.[21] Many of its members were supporters of the Conservative Party of Saskatchewan frustrated with the success of the Liberal Party as a result of strong support from Catholics.[22]

    All our troubles, all the sedition, plotting and plans against the national school system are hatched in Quebec.
    —Reverend S. P. Rondeau, 10 January 1929[23]
    Under the leadership of Hawkins and Maloney, the Klan became increasingly anti-Catholic and anti-French, and campaigned against the separate school system[19] with the slogan "one nation, one flag, one language, one school".[24] They opposed "crucifixes on public school walls, nuns teaching in public schools, and the teaching of French in public schools", blaming these issues on Quebec.[25] (The Constitution Act, 1867 guaranteed provincial rights to education and language, protecting minority rights, including those of Catholics and French-speaking citizens.) At a meeting of the Ku Klux Klan on 10 January 1929 at the Regent Hall in Saskatoon, reverend S.P. Rondeau stated that Quebec was attempting to establish Saskatchewan as a second French-speaking province.[23] Newly founded local chapters would announce their presence to the community with a ritual cross burning.[26
    from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ku_Klux_Klan_in_Canada

    Or consider this from another site:
    About 70 years ago the Ku Klux Klan was Saskatchewan's largest organization besides the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool. Saskatchewan had over 10,000 Klan members in the late 1920's. The KKK targeted the Catholics, Jewish, French, Chinese, Metis and African Americans. Klan members believed in white supremacy, that whites are better than any other race. In Saskatchewan it was mainly catholics and first nations because African Americans and the Chinese weren't established here at the time. The Klan was so big back then that they put ads in newspapers to recruit more klansmen.

    The Conservatives were the opposition in Saskatchewan at the time. They had members that were part of the Klan. James Gardiner, Premier of Saskatchewan at the time, was against the KKK and fought back. After the Conservatives no longer had any power, the Klan started to die out.

    Oh Fjlip: There are lots of pictures on this site too but I refuse to post those to glorify Klan activities so if you want to see Klan pictures in Saskatchewan you will have to look them up yourself Reply With Quote
    Jun 29, 2020 | 07:15 19
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    No, just offering some helpful advice, that if you want to earn credibility ( just like suggested in another thread regarding respect, both have to be earned), not running away from uncomfortable questions every time they come up, would work wonders.

    If you don't think that credibility is important, then carry on as is, but you are investing a massive amount of time for absolutely no results. The ROI on your efforts is not good. Perhaps quality over quantity would be a better approach. Finish one issue before moving on to another. Almost every other thread has someone asking you for an answer, and instead, you start another thread on another topic, rather than support your argument.

    Not all of us are dead set in our ways, and cannot be convinced if presented with facts that contradict our biases. You throw out some baseless insinuations, then, instead of defending them when we question them, you throw out some insults and childish name calling, then run away and start a new thread. If you think that you have the not only the moral high ground, but also the facts on your side, then stick with it, and defend your position. You might yet make some converts to your way of thinking.
    A5 do you think I really care if you think I am credible? LOL.

    When you are losing you seem to switch to talking about me. That's a sure sign you don't have much to say about the subject.

    I did ask how are all these changes and concerns and awareness about racism are affecting you negatively? No answer. Flea was honest. What's your excuse?

    When marginalized people subject to racism make gains, there has always been push back from those who are resistant to change. Many Agriville posters are pushing back.

    One lesson from history is no nation is immune from hate groups. Far right extremist groups pose a danger and with Trump spouting hate and division, its even more important to stand up against those who would take us back down an ugly path. Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Jun 29, 2020 | 11:44 20 "Far right extremist groups pose a danger and with Trump spouting hate and division, its even more important to stand up against those who would take us back down an ugly path".

    Far left extremist groups pose a danger and with SJWs spouting hate and division, it's even more important to stand up against those who would take us back down an ugly path. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 29, 2020 | 12:58 21 I haven't seen a lot of protestors in Mexico wanting to defund the police force.

    In fact in some areas, citizens would probably like to see more police protection.

    34,582 murdered in 2019. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 29, 2020 | 13:32 22
    Quote Originally Posted by rumrocks View Post
    I haven't seen a lot of protestors in Mexico wanting to defund the police force.

    In fact in some areas, citizens would probably like to see more police protection.

    34,582 murdered in 2019.

    Mostly gang-related? Reply With Quote
    Jun 29, 2020 | 15:09 23 https://twitter.com/PriapusIQ/status...91846921371648

    One man's opinion.


    Warning ------ contains Pierre Trudeau language. Reply With Quote
    Jun 30, 2020 | 13:09 24
    Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
    "Far right extremist groups pose a danger and with Trump spouting hate and division, its even more important to stand up against those who would take us back down an ugly path".

    Far left extremist groups pose a danger and with SJWs spouting hate and division, it's even more important to stand up against those who would take us back down an ugly path.
    BP Such an original post! LOL

    Where is your evidence to back up your opinion?

    Here is mine:
    The most recent in-depth analysis of far-right terrorism comes from the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).

    In a report released last week, the Escalating Terrorism Problem in the United States, CSIS analyses 25 years of domestic terrorism incidents and finds that the majority of attacks and plots have come from the far right.

    The report says “the majority of all terrorist incidents in the United States since 1994, and the total number of rightwing attacks and plots has grown significantly during the past six years”, with the far right launching two-thirds of attacks and plots in 2019, and 90% of those in 2020.

    The report adds: “Far-right terrorism has significantly outpaced terrorism from other types of perpetrators.” The second most significant source of attacks and plots in the US has been “religious extremists”, almost all “Salafi jihadists inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaida”.
    Advertisement

    The report shows the far left has been an increasingly negligible source of attacks since the mid 2000s. At that time the FBI defined arsons and other forms of property damage as domestic terrorism during a period some have called the “Green Scare”.
    Last edited by chuckChuck; Jun 30, 2020 at 13:36.
    Reply With Quote
    Jun 30, 2020 | 13:12 25 https://www.csis.org/programs/about-us


    About Us

    The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) is a bipartisan, nonprofit policy research organization dedicated to advancing practical ideas to address the world’s greatest challenges.

    Thomas J. Pritzker was named chairman of the CSIS Board of Trustees in 2015, succeeding former U.S. Senator Sam Nunn (D-GA). Founded in 1962, CSIS is led by John J. Hamre, who has served as president and chief executive officer since 2000.
    Thomas J. Pritzker (left) and John J. Hamre (right).

    CSIS’s purpose is to define the future of national security. We are guided by a distinct set of values—non-partisanship, independent thought, innovative thinking, cross-disciplinary scholarship, integrity and professionalism, and talent development. CSIS’s values work in concert toward the goal of making real-world impact.

    CSIS scholars bring their policy expertise, judgment, and robust networks to their research, analysis, and recommendations. We organize conferences, publish, lecture, and make media appearances that aim to increase the knowledge, awareness, and salience of policy issues with relevant stakeholders and the interested public.

    CSIS has impact when our research helps to inform the decisionmaking of key policymakers and the thinking of key influencers. We work toward a vision of a safer and more prosperous world.

    CSIS is ranked the number one think tank in the United States as well as the defense and national security center of excellence for 2016-2018 by the University of Pennsylvania’s "Global Go To Think Tank Index." Reply With Quote
    Jul 1, 2020 | 08:56 26 It’s about time ...
    https://www.foxnews.com/us/seattle-police-chop-protest-durkan

    Virtually all those involved are far left extremists Reply With Quote
    Jul 1, 2020 | 09:08 27 More divisive hateful propaganda trying to label violence as "far right" or even "far left".
    Violence is violence, end of sentence.
    Every time you qualify "violence" or whatever the action is, with "far right", "black, white" etc. You are lumping in a pile of people who have nothing to do with whatever it is you are trying to accuse them of. Reply With Quote

  • Jul 1, 2020 | 10:16 28
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    A5 do you think I really care if you think I am credible? LOL.

    When you are losing you seem to switch to talking about me. That's a sure sign you don't have much to say about the subject.

    I did ask how are all these changes and concerns and awareness about racism are affecting you negatively? No answer. Flea was honest. What's your excuse?

    When marginalized people subject to racism make gains, there has always been push back from those who are resistant to change. Many Agriville posters are pushing back.

    One lesson from history is no nation is immune from hate groups. Far right extremist groups pose a danger and with Trump spouting hate and division, its even more important to stand up against those who would take us back down an ugly path.
    You should care if you are credible. It speaks volumes to your character. Reply With Quote

  • Jul 1, 2020 | 10:46 29
    Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
    You should care if you are credible. It speaks volumes to your character.
    Perhaps he has accepted that he is playing for an audience of one(2 now counting flea beetle), after realizing that everyone else has him on ignore? It was certainly odd how he singled out my opinion out in that response. Perhaps he is delusional enough to assume that all the posters who no longer consider him worth a response, consider him credible?

    Measuring the results against an expected outcome is hardly an objective exercise. If the expected outcome is converting farmers to become rabid Marxists, then it appears the effort has been a unmitigated failure. If the expected outcome of insulting everyone who disagrees, name calling, avoiding all uncomfortable questions, and running away rather than face the facts, was to solidify opposition to his extremist views, then Chuck's strategy has been a roaring success. Perhaps it is all in how you frame the problem...

    I just can't imagine how or why anyone would waste such a massive amount of their life on a mission, and not care if it is effective.

    Might as well just spend all the money on crop inputs, equipment, labor, etc, then just pile them up in the center of the field and let it rot, if results don't matter. On paper you just grew an excellent crop with all the right inputs... Reply With Quote
    Jul 1, 2020 | 10:52 30
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    A5 do you think I really care if you think I am credible? LOL.

    When you are losing you seem to switch to talking about me. That's a sure sign you don't have much to say about the subject.

    I did ask how are all these changes and concerns and awareness about racism are affecting you negatively? No answer. Flea was honest. What's your excuse?

    When marginalized people subject to racism make gains, there has always been push back from those who are resistant to change. Many Agriville posters are pushing back.

    One lesson from history is no nation is immune from hate groups. Far right extremist groups pose a danger and with Trump spouting hate and division, its even more important to stand up against those who would take us back down an ugly path.
    It is crazy how you can even try misconstrue treating people with respect into support for your cause to show racism where there is none. And you even continue to tow the line even after being proven completely wrong in the other thread. No wonder you moved to this one. Wanted to leave your epic brain fart behind. Reply With Quote