Norway plans big expansion of Arctic oil exploration

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Norway plans big expansion of Arctic oil exploration

Jun 24, 2020 | 18:29 1 Woke Norway the climate leader and UN sweetheart ignoring renewables all together and plowing ahead with more O&G exploration. And they won one of the UN seats too.

Thought oil was dead chuck?

Now start scouring the cbc website for your slanted rebuttle.

Why not just admit you are a raging hypocrite of the first order.

Norway plans big expansion of Arctic oil exploration Reply With Quote

  • Jun 24, 2020 | 19:24 2 The myth of social license can be officially put out of its misery. Reply With Quote
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  • fjlip's Avatar Jun 24, 2020 | 19:30 3 HMMM … emissions from territories don't apply, ya right two faced bullshit to say F*CK you Paris Accord horseshit! Norwegians know how! Great job Norway! Giver hell! Reply With Quote

  • Jun 24, 2020 | 22:18 4 I simply don’t understand how so many people have swallowed the b/s of this liberal government here in Canada .
    Most of the other resource rich countries around the world are simply laughing at what’s happening in Canada right now . Saying thank you , we will step up and take your markets .
    Meanwhile our country is getting more divided daily by this virtue signaling bunch of twits pandering to every thing else but how to run an economy. History will look back at this time here in Canada and will see how foolish Canadians were . Reply With Quote

  • Jun 24, 2020 | 22:31 5 Vikings win again. No looking back for those boys👍 Reply With Quote

  • Jun 25, 2020 | 07:37 6 It seems to me it wasn’t that long ago that Chuck pasted an article from the Globe and Mail talking about how Norway’s sovereign wealth fund was divesting itself oil sands assets. My thought at the time was that Alberta’s oil is competition for Norway’s oil and anything Norway can do on the world stage to hurt Alberta is good for Norway! But Chuck said this is just confirmation that there is no future for oil. People like Chuck and for that matter our Prime Minister need to wake the phuck up and pull their head out of their butts and realize that oil still has an important roll to play in our energy mix for the foreseeable future! Reply With Quote

  • Jun 25, 2020 | 08:14 7 Not that I want a bunch of cut and paste but where is the comments from the chuck chuck on Norway's reversal on getting out of oil...

    That organ between the ears is such a wonderful thing ...too bad so many in politics are either lacking one or cant use it. Reply With Quote

  • fjlip's Avatar Jun 25, 2020 | 09:04 8 Chuck looking for the PEER reviewed by 97% of "experts" that Norway's oil has NO C02 emissions, only DIRTY EXPENSIVE Canadian crap...wait for it... Reply With Quote
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  • blackpowder's Avatar Jun 25, 2020 | 09:56 9 Chuck will never admit to this, but he has never made a living past his own gate or little circle of colleagues.
    I have a neighbor who worked the oil fields in Russia. Where Putin is soon leader for life.
    Another who did a lot of off shore stuff in the Middle East. Kingdoms.
    What have SJWs ever really done.
    Nothing they say can hold water in real life.
    Norway is a good example. Of keeping your eyes on the prize while being fiscally responsible. Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 25, 2020 | 10:01 10 Canada has virtue signalled itself into ruin. Skippy pandered to the UN like an idiot, carbon taxed us, demeaned oil, shut down pipelines and tried to kill the industry and still didnt get a UN seat. A week later after Norway gets it, they ignore climate change and forge ahead.

    Man are there some stupid people existing in this country.

    Chuck working over time at the CBC site trying to find a peer reviewed article to spin this. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 25, 2020 | 11:27 11 In a falling interest rate environment, commodity producers have no choice but to simply increase output as much as they can, by borrowing as much as they can, and accepting whatever price the market offers. And that price is falling. This is not the 1970s. Commodity producers do not have pricing power like they did back then. As much as OPEC talks about trying to push up the price of oil, there is no way for them to do that. Reply With Quote
    Jun 25, 2020 | 11:37 12
    Quote Originally Posted by Austrian Economics View Post
    In a falling interest rate environment, commodity producers have no choice but to simply increase output as much as they can, .
    Sounds like farming AE. Reply With Quote
    Jun 25, 2020 | 12:09 13
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    Sounds like farming AE.
    You are exactly right. Unstable and falling interest rates put every farmer in a profit margin vise. Falling rates push down ag commodity prices while at the same time triggering a relentless rise in farmland values. Eventually, those who cannot service their debts will exit the business. Reply With Quote
    Jun 25, 2020 | 12:25 14 And yet John Deere and Case have the ability to charge whatever they want.... Reply With Quote
    Jun 25, 2020 | 15:00 15
    Quote Originally Posted by Austrian Economics View Post
    You are exactly right. Unstable and falling interest rates put every farmer in a profit margin vise. Falling rates push down ag commodity prices while at the same time triggering a relentless rise in farmland values. Eventually, those who cannot service their debts will exit the business.
    Ummmmm , agree, but that’s been unfolding for several years already , no ?? Reply With Quote
    Jun 25, 2020 | 15:14 16
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Ummmmm , agree, but that’s been unfolding for several years already , no ??
    Quit renting from people who were only looking for a place to dump money!
    Foreigners and Domestics.
    Then maybe our young people could afford to buy some of it!
    HTF(how the fk) is $80-100/ ac going to look in some of the drought affected areas or areas way too wet?
    WTF(who the fk) is carrying all the risk?
    Give your fn heads a shake for a minute. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 26, 2020 | 08:02 17 Before Trudeau became PM Steven Harper signed a G7 agreement that said by the year 2100 Canada would stop using fossil fuel as an energy source. That was pretty radical for the MP from Calgary! LOL

    I have no control over what Norway does. Oil is still important and will be used for several decades. But the search for and transition to cleaner sources of energy is well underway. Reply With Quote
    Jun 26, 2020 | 09:28 18

    Some pictures are truly worth 1000 meaningless words .
    Or 2030 useless words

    Also this rings very true ..... 👇🏽
    Reply With Quote

  • Jun 27, 2020 | 18:41 19
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Quit renting from people who were only looking for a place to dump money!
    Foreigners and Domestics.
    Then maybe our young people could afford to buy some of it!
    HTF(how the fk) is $80-100/ ac going to look in some of the drought affected areas or areas way too wet?
    WTF(who the fk) is carrying all the risk?
    Give your fn heads a shake for a minute.
    Yup happening here as well
    You go west of here it’s bizarre actually
    Well and east to hobby farmer’s area
    A lot of big investor money floating around
    Some got caught big time last two years here with dry conditions and the very short growing seasons but always seems to be someone sweeps in and keeps the ball rolling .
    Last edited by furrowtickler; Jun 27, 2020 at 18:45.
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    Jun 27, 2020 | 19:08 20
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Before Trudeau became PM Steven Harper signed a G7 agreement that said by the year 2100 Canada would stop using fossil fuel as an energy source. That was pretty radical for the MP from Calgary! LOL

    I have no control over what Norway does. Oil is still important and will be used for several decades. But the search for and transition to cleaner sources of energy is well underway.
    I wonder if gretta is going to hold protests in Norway 🇳🇴 now ?? Reply With Quote

  • ajl
    Jun 27, 2020 | 21:46 21 Interesting that given the choice between supporting the fossil fuels industry or becoming a third world nation, Norwegians are smart enough to make the correct choice. Unfortunately for them it will prove to be too little, too late because we have just entered a global economic depression that will not be ending any time soon. Anyways, Norwegians can come to their senses apparently, but are canuckistani that smart? I fear not. Too many in this country have not a clue were our prosperity comes from. They think it comes from the gubmint. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 27, 2020 | 22:02 22 Covid-19 was likely just a catalyst for what was going to happen sooner or later anyway.

    I can't imagine how this is going to end.....

    Is this the beginning of the big reset? Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 27, 2020 | 22:14 23
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Covid-19 was likely just a catalyst for what was going to happen sooner or later anyway.

    I can't imagine how this is going to end.....

    Is this the beginning of the big reset?
    Unfortunately you are bang on Reply With Quote
    Jun 27, 2020 | 23:10 24
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Covid-19 was likely just a catalyst for what was going to happen sooner or later anyway.

    I can't imagine how this is going to end.....

    Is this the beginning of the big reset?
    Bout time. Should have started three years ago

    For clarity, my comment was with regard to the financial system problems, nothing more
    Last edited by farming101; Jun 28, 2020 at 08:18.
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    Jun 27, 2020 | 23:54 25
    Quote Originally Posted by Hamloc View Post
    It People like Chuck and for that matter our Prime Minister need to wake the phuck up and pull their head out of their butts and realize that oil still has an important roll to play in our energy mix for the foreseeable future!
    Need to gather chuckles and skippies, tie them on a stoneboat and run them back and forth with a peppy boat on a dugout till they glug and moan, “Uncle” Saves waterboarding in a facility. Cost cutting. Who’s got a peppy boat for the first run at the National Oil
    Woke? Could have thousands of woking events on farms all summer. One suggestion from a Viking. Every once in awhile the old urge to put on my helmet rises in my warrior heritage. Alive and well it is. Pars. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 28, 2020 | 00:03 26
    Quote Originally Posted by Austrian Economics View Post
    You are exactly right. Unstable and falling interest rates put every farmer in a profit margin vise. Falling rates push down ag commodity prices while at the same time triggering a relentless rise in farmland values. Eventually, those who cannot service their debts will exit the business.
    Methinks interest rates are going to rise. Canada will find it difficult to find a money lender. People will get hungry. Which reminds me, nice Saskatoons getting fat. Pars. Reply With Quote
    Jun 28, 2020 | 07:29 27
    Quote Originally Posted by parsley View Post
    Need to gather chuckles and skippies, tie them on a stoneboat and run them back and forth with a peppy boat on a dugout till they glug and moan, “Uncle” Saves waterboarding in a facility. Cost cutting. Who’s got a peppy boat for the first run at the National Oil
    Woke? Could have thousands of woking events on farms all summer. One suggestion from a Viking. Every once in awhile the old urge to put on my helmet rises in my warrior heritage. Alive and well it is. Pars.
    Skål! Reply With Quote
    Jun 28, 2020 | 07:45 28
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Covid-19 was likely just a catalyst for what was going to happen sooner or later anyway.

    I can't imagine how this is going to end.....

    Is this the beginning of the big reset?
    "...the big reset?"

    If one could call the Bolshevik Revolution a big reset, then...

    The possibilities and potentials of this engineered upheaval are mind-numbing.

    In 1917, the kulaks - larger farmland and property holders -were routed off their sizable holdings and banished to Siberia, labour camps or simply murdered. 10 -20 million of them, the mainstay farmers of Eastern Europe.

    The peasants, who were the impoverished, plot-sized landowner, leftovers from fairly recently ended feudal system days, joined forces with the Bolshevik rabble-rousers to become an disproportionately large factor in the overthrow of the economic system of the day.

    They thought they were goping to be better off by destroying the existing socio-economic order.

    The term "kulak", I read, had a literal translation of "tight-fisted". So the beggared masses were bitterly fed up with the financial disparity between themselves and those for whom they labored. For a pittance.

    A steady diet of bitterness makes thin gruel for peaceful negotiation.

    The October revolution ended up with far worse social and economic conditions for even more of the population than under the Czarist days.

    The peasants, the proletariat, were fooled by their deceptive Marxist leadership. Quelle surprise.

    What cannot be ignored in this time is the fact that if these trends into lawlessness continue, we, as the modern day equivalent of the Kulaks, have by far the most at risk.

    What insurance is available to protect against that?
    Last edited by burnt; Jun 28, 2020 at 07:49.
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    Jun 28, 2020 | 09:29 29 It's the right wing counter revolutionaries at work on agriville! It's a war out there. LOL

    Anyone who doesn't fully agree with them is the enemy!

    And Parsley is advocating torture and violence against people she doesn't agree with? That's getting desperate and a sign she is losing the battle or maybe her marbles?

    Since Steve Harper signed us on to the G7 agreement to stop using oil as an energy source by 2100, are you going to torture him too? LMAO

    It's sillyville at full bloom! Reply With Quote
    Jun 28, 2020 | 10:28 30 An even more important point, however, is whether the BoC could even tear up its stockpile of GoC bonds in the first place. The way double entry accounting works, every asset on the BoC’s balance sheet needs a corresponding liability. So the BoC can’t simply “vaporize” GoC bond assets*off its balance sheet. Doing so would require it to also tear up a corresponding amount of liabilities. But we know that BoC liabilities are assets of the private sector.*So the BoC could tear up cash in circulation or delete bank reserves from the accounts of commercial banks if it*wanted to destroy its own liabilities, but doing so would destroy private sector wealth, which is the last thing the BoC wants to do.

    The point is that the BoC really has no need to “forgive” debt of the federal government, and even if they did, they couldn’t really just tear up bonds in*a figurative sense.*The government already gets interest-free money from the Bank of Canada, making QE and monetary financing already somewhat of a “debt jubilee” for the Government. The most direct method to implement this de facto debt jubilee would be for the BoC to simply buy government debt on the primary market. The alternative is for the GoC to instead issue debt to the private sector in the primary market, with the BoC then buying this debt on the secondary market and*thus*“forgiving” the loan. And there you have it – a modern day government “debt jubilee”.


    https://crusoeeconomics.com/2020/04/11/a-government-debt-jubilee/

    My best educated guess is interest rates will stick where they are. The currency will be where the wild gyrations occur as we have seen with the real and yuan, peso etc. The dream of a debt jubilee can only occur if the entire world agrees to it, otherwise we are likely looking at a hot war. Am interest rate spike would run counter to the current trend in Japan and EU that's been in existence long enough im cautious of a change but not expecting one. The system needs a relief valve and it comes back to currency. At present the central banks "got this" on rates. They can't control capital flow in and out. This leaves them as the only buyer of govt debt. There won't be a crash here it's simply a no trade. Having said that, credit availability could simply dry up no matter what the rate forcing BOC and other CB's being the only lender for private entities. As Mrs. Booth has pointed out, every CB's inflation indicator model is broken and they are flying blind. Money creation and inflation starts with the commercial banks lending moreso then CB policy. Hope this helps, I'm expecting a serious deflation event ahead. Think -$40 crude spreading to every commodity sector like a virus. Reply With Quote