Quaker gets woke

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Quaker gets woke

wd9
Jun 21, 2020 | 21:01 61
Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
What negative impact did aunt jemima have on anybody is the even bigger question here.
They're racist myths of happy Black servitude. Reply With Quote
Jun 22, 2020 | 00:44 62
Quote Originally Posted by wd9 View Post
They're racist myths of happy Black servitude.
Celebrating White person rags to riches. Good! Celebrating Black person rags to riches. Racist! Oh my god guys. Give it up already. The double standards are outrageous.

Do you have a rubric handy on who is allowed to be on an advertisement? Reply With Quote
wd9
Jun 22, 2020 | 05:54 63
Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
Celebrating White person rags to riches. Good! Celebrating Black person rags to riches. Racist! Oh my god guys. Give it up already. The double standards are outrageous.

Do you have a rubric handy on who is allowed to be on an advertisement?
Then don't ask. Reply With Quote
Jun 22, 2020 | 06:58 64
Quote Originally Posted by wd9 View Post
Then don't ask.
I don’t recall asking you anything directly. Still butt hurt over last time i see.

By the way, I didn’t say don’t answer the question. I said give up with the double standards.
Last edited by flea beetle; Jun 22, 2020 at 07:34.
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Jun 22, 2020 | 07:18 65 Name:  jd a 001.jpg
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..... Reply With Quote
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  • wd9
    Jun 23, 2020 | 00:16 66
    Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
    I don’t recall asking you anything directly. Still butt hurt over last time i see.

    By the way, I didn’t say don’t answer the question. I said give up with the double standards.
    Is the Aunt Jemima brand and logo based on a racial stereotype?

    There is no double standard, the millionaire story is a complete myth. Green could not live off the earnings she made from her portrayal of Aunt Jemima, and continued to work as a housekeeper until a few years before her death in 1923.
    Last edited by wd9; Jun 23, 2020 at 00:54.
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    Jun 23, 2020 | 01:10 67
    Quote Originally Posted by wd9 View Post
    Is the Aunt Jemima brand and logo based on a racial stereotype?

    There is no double standard, the millionaire story is a complete myth. Green could not live off the earnings she made from her portrayal of Aunt Jemima, and continued to work as a housekeeper until a few years before her death in 1923.
    How’s Opra doing ?
    Obama ?
    The thousands of immigrant , blacks, Hispanic,...... of sports stars ,celebrities and on and on ...you know the ones who were Very successful in life, great for them but .... the very ones condemning the rest of us for just working our buts off to make a living and all raising a family in our communities..... talk about the most sickening thing in history right now .
    Multimillionaires shaming us for existing... really ?????? Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 23, 2020 | 08:14 68
    Quote Originally Posted by wd9 View Post
    Is the Aunt Jemima brand and logo based on a racial stereotype?

    There is no double standard, the millionaire story is a complete myth. Green could not live off the earnings she made from her portrayal of Aunt Jemima, and continued to work as a housekeeper until a few years before her death in 1923.
    Fill me in on the racial stereotype. It is a picture of a lady on a box/bottle. Who cares what here background is. When there is a white lady on an advertisement, you don't go looking where she was born, who her parents were, and what her upbringing was like. You take the advertisement for what it is. Why is this any different?

    Other people don't continue to work after doing an advertisement for one company?
    Last edited by flea beetle; Jun 23, 2020 at 08:22.
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  • wd9
    Jun 23, 2020 | 09:51 69
    Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
    Fill me in on the racial stereotype. It is a picture of a lady on a box/bottle. Who cares what here background is. When there is a white lady on an advertisement, you don't go looking where she was born, who her parents were, and what her upbringing was like. You take the advertisement for what it is. Why is this any different?

    Other people don't continue to work after doing an advertisement for one company?
    Maybe someone else can explain racism to you. Reply With Quote
    Jun 23, 2020 | 10:08 70 It’s obvious you have nothing. Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 23, 2020 | 12:03 71
    Quote Originally Posted by wd9 View Post
    Maybe someone else can explain racism to you.
    Can you explain how this action will improve the lives of blacks in 2020?

    It will cost an absolute fortune To rebrand their product. Does wasting all of that money help blacks today?

    I am just failing to see the benefit to this action Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 23, 2020 | 12:38 72
    Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
    It’s obvious you have nothing.
    Sweet Jesus stop typing. Reply With Quote
    Jun 23, 2020 | 13:10 73
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    Sweet Jesus stop typing.
    What a discrinatory thing to say. Some would even go so far as to label it hate speech.
    https://www.google.com/url?q=https:/...eTD1rxrC0sh_Vg

    Personally I could care less, but just wanted to point out that once you start playing this game, where does it end? Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 23, 2020 | 13:47 74
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    Sweet Jesus stop typing.
    I must be saying all the right things. I pretty well have all the leftards mad at me and chucky quit spewing his garbage. #winning Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 23, 2020 | 22:01 75
    Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
    I must be saying all the right things. I pretty well have all the leftards mad at me and chucky quit spewing his garbage. #winning
    Yes, you win. Reply With Quote
    Jun 23, 2020 | 22:12 76
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    Yes, you win.
    Aww come on. I thought you had more spunk than that. Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 06:32 77 Good riddance Aunt Jemima, and goodbye to Uncle Ben, too
    Lawrence Hill
    Special to The Globe and Mail
    Published June 18, 2020
    Updated June 19, 2020
    513 Comments

    Lawrence Hill is an award-winning novelist, essayist and memoirist. He is completing a new novel for children and teaches at the University of Guelph.

    Growing up in Toronto in the 1960s, as the child of a Black man and white woman who were civil rights activists and atheists, I was taught these cardinal rules:

    Thou shalt not eat anything from South Africa, because we refuse to support Apartheid, and;

    Thou shalt not consume any Aunt Jemima product, because we reject the stereotype of the kerchief-covered, enslaved Black woman who radiates joy while cooking for white folks.

    Apartheid has crumbled, and after nearly 131 years of tainting the kitchens of Americans and Canadians, so has Aunt Jemima pancake mix. And the syrup that went with it. Quaker Oats announced this week that it will end the brand because it “recognizes that Aunt Jemima is based on a racial stereotype.”

    I wish my parents, Daniel and Donna Hill, were still around to do a victory dance. They didn’t make it easy for my brother, sister or me when we were children. My mother was so orthodox about this boycott that she told us not to bother ordering pancakes in restaurants. In the homes of friends, we were to ask how the pancakes were made, and which syrup it was. If it was Aunt Jemima, we were to decline politely. I can’t exaggerate how difficult it was, growing up in the Toronto suburb of Don Mills – predominantly white at the time – to explain to my friends why I would not touch anything that had to do with Aunt Jemima. But I did my best to convey what my father had explained to me.

    “Larry,” he said, “that kerchief is the symbol of a slave woman, or possibly a house servant. And ‘Aunt Jemima’ is an offensive term for a Black slave woman. Does it make sense to you that nothing makes her happier than cooking for white folks?”

    I embraced the rule, and as the years passed, began to learn more about Aunt Jemima and her history.

    First, since the days of slavery and segregation, Black people were called terms such as Jemima, Ben, Sam, boy and girl – terms that infantilized and demeaned them.

    Second, the term “Aunt Jemima” became a household name nearly 200 years ago as a result of another racist legacy – the minstrel show that mocks Black people for the entertainment of white audiences. According to the book Out of Sight: The Rise of African American Popular Music, by Lynn Abbott and Doug Seroff, the Black entertainer Billy Kersands (c.1842-1915), who played the role of a dimwitted Black man, popularized the term by singing and cavorting to the song “Old Aunt Jemima.” The lyrics are noted in a book published in 1875 entitled Great Georgia Minstrels Songbook. Clearly, they aim to ridicule Black people:

    “I went to the hen-house on my knees/

    Old Aunt Jemima, Oh oh oh.

    I thought I heard a chicken sneeze/

    Old Aunt Jemima, Oh oh oh.”

    Since 1889, when Chris Rutt and Charles Underwood of the Pearl Milling Company developed the Aunt Jemima product as the world’s first ready-mix, the Aunt Jemima image has become one of North America’s most enduring racial stereotypes. Quaker Oats offers a timeline of the product on its website, and acknowledges that Aunt Jemima “was brought to life” by using the image of Nancy Green, a Black woman who was formerly enslaved and who became the face of the product in the 1890s. Ms. Green was introduced as Aunt Jemima at a public exhibition in Chicago in 1893. She continued to play the role until 1923, when she was standing on a sidewalk in Chicago and was fatally struck by a car.

    On Wednesday, I read the following line on the website of PepsiCo, which owns Quaker Oats:

    “Aunt Jemima pancakes and syrup stand for warmth, nourishment and trust – qualities you’ll find in loving moms who provide a wholesome breakfast for the whole family.”

    Utterly anachronistic, sexist and all-around offensive because of what it says and what it doesn’t say, the line happily ignores the violence that Black people have endured on this continent for 400 years.

    Recently, my dog Munro and I were out walking on garbage day. In a recycling box near my home in Hamilton, Ont., I saw an Aunt Jemima bottle. I cringed, as I have each time the products have revealed themselves on the kitchen shelves of my friends. The Aunt Jemima products are ugly little mirrors of injustice that we should have moved past long ago. But I won’t have to cringe much longer. Good riddance, Aunt Jemima. And it’s good to know that soon, Uncle Ben will also bite the dust. Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 06:35 78 https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saska...uest-1.5615938

    Parents of Black Sask. teen who took own life call for stronger anti-racism action

    Expert says education leaders must take proactive approach to racism
    Kendall Latimer · CBC News · Posted: Jun 24, 2020 2:00 AM CT | Last Updated: 5 hours ago

    Kaleab Schmidt had a kind heart, his father said, and wanted to become a lawyer when he grew up if he couldn't play football professionally. (Submitted by Belan Tsegaye)

    Sandra Barker-Schmidt and her husband, Dean Schmidt, are grappling with a difficult question this fall: Should they send their daughter ​​Kidist to the same school where her older brother endured seemingly endless racist taunts before he died?

    It's where most of Kidist's friends will go, and switching schools would mean about a 45-minute commute to Regina every day.

    "But then, there are schools in Regina that have more diversity," Dean Schmidt said.

    Kaleab Dean Schmidt died by suicide on the family farm near Balgonie, Sask., on April 30, 2018. He was 13.

    A coroner's inquest held in March heard that Kaleab was bullied repeatedly about being Black while attending Greenall High School in Balgonie. There was even a Snapchat group called "I hate Kaleab Schmidt."

    In March, the inquest jury released several recommendations with the intent of preventing something similar from happening again. Several of the recommendations were directed at the high school and the Prairie Valley School Division and called for the reevaluation of school policies and anti-bullying efforts, saying a "poster in the hallway is not effective."

    Barker-Schmidt and her husband aren't sure what's changed since the inquest. "They've never reached out to us," she said.

    Superintendent of Education Lorrie Anne Harkness acknowledged that no changes to school policies were made in response to the inquest, emphasizing that they were made earlier, after Kaleab's death.
    Sandra Barker-Schmidt and Dean Schmidt adopted Kaleab from Ethiopia when he was seven years old, along with his two sisters. (Brian Rodgers/CBC)

    "When the recommendations came, we were actually comforted that what was outlined reflected the practices we currently practise in our school division. So we can confidently say that we addressed every one of those recommendations," she said.

    For example, Harkness said policies were tweaked to make definitions of bullying and harassment clearer and professional development was increased to ensure staff document all behavioural incidents.

    Even so, there has been no sign of any campaign or program dedicated to fighting anti-Black racism.

    ​"W​hat are they doing about it when the ki​d is caught bullying or having racist comments?" said Barker-Schmidt.

    Dean Schmidt isn't confident that what's happening behind closed doors is enough. "That's why we want to go to the MLAs, because [students] get away with it ... and it's not right. They've got to be held accountable."
    'It scared him'

    ​Schmidt and his wife adopted Kaleab and his two sisters from Ethiopia in 2012. Kaleab's parents describe him as a kind-hearted old soul who wanted to be a lawyer if he couldn't play professional football.

    They say he loved sports, was an honour roll student and was tender with animals.

    At school, he had been suspended multiple times because he fought students who taunted him with the N-word. Four days before his death, Kaleab had again been suspended after fighting with a classmate. This time, RCMP charged Kaleab with assault causing bodily harm.

    "That charge, it scared him. He thought he was letting his friends, volunteers and coaches down," Schmidt said. The next day, he died by suicide.

    Teen suicide inquest jury recommends anti-bullying protocol, record incidents in database
    Balgonie teen who took his own life was subjected to racial slurs, inquest hears
    Inquest hears boy, 13, was bullied, faced racism at Balgonie school before taking own life

    Systemic racism has dominated discussions since the death of George Floyd, a Black man killed by a Minneapolis police officer in May.

    Kaleab's parents hope this brings meaningful change. They took their daughters to a Black Lives Matter rally in Regina and said they felt Kaleab's presence and support there. "We just want change for Kaleab," Barker-Schmidt said.

    A racist video by two Montreal-area teens has sparked outrage. While some are threatening retribution, some teenagers in the Black community hope it becomes an opportunity for education about racism and white privilege. 1:52

    And yet he's still being targeted, two years after his death. This school year, some students made racist comments on a Snapchat tribute post to Kaleab, including "I hate n--gers." A similar incident happened last year.

    When Barker-Schmidt mentioned it to police, she said they told her there's nothing much they can do about it — and that it's really up to the family to talk to the student who posted the slur.

    "I think people should be charged because if they're not, it's just going to keep going on, and it hurts," Barker-Schmidt said.
    Educators must act, says expert

    When asked if she thought more needed to be done to combat racism in the Prairie Valley School Division, Harkness said it's a community problem. "This isn't a burden solely on the shoulders of educators," she said.

    Natasha Henry, an education consultant, historian and educator based in Ontario, said proactively dealing with racism is critical for educators.

    "By not recognizing the role that the education system plays in perpetuating and reinforcing racism stereotypes and prejudice, [it's] really about trying to absolve themselves of a very serious responsibility," said Henry, who helps develop curriculum resources specific to Black history and provides support to Black students.

    "Leaders and educators in these positions should realize that education is part of a broader system as a microcosm of society, and so that blame can't be placed outside, and they have to look at the role they play — whether it's intentional or not." Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 06:42 79 There you go Flea Beetle.

    An explanation of why Aunt Jemina is a racist stereotype and a real life example of racist bullying that resulted in a teen suicide.

    Now, are you still proud of your denial of the negative consequences of racism? Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Jun 24, 2020 | 07:27 80 I don't know how big Balgonie is. But in my small town. Gawd help you if your a kid and different in any way.
    Ask any kid that moved in to a grade where all 10 of their peers grew up together. Ask any Newfie kid for eg. Skin color just an easy descriptor.
    Lord of the Flies isn't racist.
    All it proves is that we're all animals in nice clothes. Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 07:55 81
    Quote Originally Posted by wd9 View Post
    They're racist myths of happy Black servitude.
    Then what should we make of the black lady in the Swifer ads? Is that racist because black women were maids? Reply With Quote
    wd9
    Jun 24, 2020 | 08:30 82
    Quote Originally Posted by Misterjade9 View Post
    Then what should we make of the black lady in the Swifer ads? Is that racist because black women were maids?
    Not sure which one you mean but like this one, what you make of it is an ad for Swiffer. It's an interracial marriage, just like my son's, showing the product.

    https://videos.dailymail.co.uk/video...4138240609.mp4 Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Jun 24, 2020 | 08:42 83 Chuck, that is a very sad story about the 13 year old boy. No excuses at all for the other children that had bullied him. May have been racist beginnings or may have been because the boy was different in many ways as he was new to Canada and had an unusual childhood. Being black may have been the easiest most identifiable difference for the kids to pick on. Kids, and people are like chickens, one starts pecking and the rest follow suit until there is blood and death. (See that here on agriville too from both sides). For sure there is racism in our world. Where my kids go to school there are only a handful of non white children. I've tried to have a couple conversations with my kids age 8 and 12 about them just to make sure my kids are accepting and not part of the problem. What I've found very interesting is that they dont recognize the difference in skin color, to them it's just normal. I don't believe there was any negative racist behaviours locally when I was growing up in the same school system but you definitely knew who you were talking about if you said the black kid or the Chinese kid etc. They were accepted but it was part of their identity. Doesnt seem to be now.

    I'm worried the more we make a big deal out of race the problems will keep get worse instead of better.

    So the history you shared of Aunt Jemima, to me the name had no negative connotations was just a name and a smiling woman, I didn't know was unaware. So now drudge up all the negativity of the past, hows that gonna help? The racist words of the past forgotten by current generations, now reinforce meanings, that's just stupid.

    In the story they boycott Aunt Jemima for reasons known to them but not to me. Well I boycott A&W because I feel they perpetuate negative feelings towards myself, my industry and my livelihood. Others dont know that, should I ask A&W to change their name because it offends me? I know the issues may not be equivalent but the relevance to the rest of the world that doesnt know is the same. Reply With Quote

  • Jun 24, 2020 | 08:45 84 The woke left is going to be very busy erasing everything that offends. Guess thats where antifa gets the burn it down and start over mentality.

    26 Sexist Ads Of The 'Mad Men' Era That Companies Wish We'd Forget

    Every culture in the world has a history of slavery, blacks, whites, natives etc. African nations had slaves and sold slaves. American Indians had other tribes as slaves. Blacks in the US had black slaves. Indians had black slaves. Incas and Myans had slaves and women from other tribes. etc

    Geezus the pyramids were made by some 30,000 slaves working for 30+ yrs along with about another dozen wonders of the world.

    Should we tear those down? Reply With Quote
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    GDR

  • Jun 24, 2020 | 08:53 85
    Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
    I don't know how big Balgonie is. But in my small town. Gawd help you if your a kid and different in any way.
    Ask any kid that moved in to a grade where all 10 of their peers grew up together. Ask any Newfie kid for eg. Skin color just an easy descriptor.
    Lord of the Flies isn't racist.
    All it proves is that we're all animals in nice clothes.
    I went to a tiny 1 room country school 1 1/2 miles up the road. All the kids came from within 1 or 2 miles. There were well-established groups there.

    When the government in its endless wisdom saw fit to amalgamate the country schools into the public system and we bussed to town, we country kids were treated poorly by many of the other students and some of the teachers. I did not enjoy that school, to say the least.

    We were all white, mostly European descent, mostly born here, a few wartime Dutch immigrants.

    This is NFLer Ben Watson in the 2014 CNN video where he gets cut off, about 1 minute in -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7PBV-bacAo





    He gets cut off because CNN doesn't like what he's saying. Promoting a message of peace and healing.

    Let CNN try that with a gay or trans person or Muslim or BLM type or pedo advocate like Kathleen Wynne's former deputy minister of education, Ben Levin and see what happens - you know they would come and tear down the fence that CNN now has around their buildings to protect them from the peaceful protests.

    But since it's okay to dump on Christians or any white people, they can cut him off and get away with it.

    Regardless of your belief system, this should put you on notice as to what happens when you don't bend the knee to the PC mob.
    Last edited by burnt; Jun 24, 2020 at 08:55.
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    Jun 24, 2020 | 09:41 86 It’s not PC to be against racism. It’s human decency. Are kids committing suicide because they have to respect and care for everyone? Racist attitudes and hate are learned. Kids are not born racists or haters. Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 09:42 87 Yes that truly is a sad situation about the young boy you posted. For the 5th time now I am agreeing with you that there is racism in the world, and it is not right. That was a combination of racism and bullying that was the issue. More so bullying in my opinion. But I don’t get where you say I have denied the negative consequences of racism. I have agreed with you all along that there is racism, but you want to totally deny that for some reason.

    Where we disagree is that You seem to think only white people are capable of racism. Tell that to the white farmers being killed in South Africa. That is total devastation towards a group of people, but never a peep about that. But an ad of a smiling woman on a box is complete over the top racism? And then you post an opinion piece as proof? Funny. Maybe she was a slave. I sure as hell don’t do background checks on every person depicted on an advertisement.

    I have said it before, and I will say it again. I have been the victim of racism before, being of Ukrainian decent. You have all heard a Ukrainian joke in your lifetime I am sure. Maybe I should go after Russian taxpayers that weren’t alive during holodomor? Demand payment for their great great grandfathers sins? Most weren’t alive during that time, and neither was I, but I demand payment.

    Or maybe I should stay at home citing that racism made it so I can’t work? Wonder how far I will get with either of those scenarios? Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 09:43 88
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    It’s not PC to be against racism. It’s human decency. Are kids committing suicide because they have to respect and care for everyone? Racist attitudes and hate are learned. Kids are not born racists or haters.
    Most kids are committing suicide because of bullying. Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 09:48 89
    Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
    I didn’t say racism isn’t a problem. But it isn’t racism that is the cause for the plight of these groups you speak of. All the programs are already in place for the FN people to climb the social ladder. I have been a victim of racism as well. Do I sit at home and wait for handouts because of it? No I go to work to support my family.

    I know of a FN guy that got his ear pulled in a resident school. He got over $100,000 because of that. A guy I went to school with got picked up by both ears and hauled out of class by his ears. Does he deserve that same $100,000? Or double because it was by both ears? Was it racism or because the kid was acting out in class and needed to be reprimanded?

    I know another FN that wasn’t even a resident at the school. He got over $250,000. His brother was mad because he was an actual resident, and still hasn’t received anything. Why are non-residents getting paid?
    Since you won’t respond to these in the other thread and claim you can’t remember what we were talking about. Reply With Quote
    Jun 24, 2020 | 09:51 90
    Quote Originally Posted by flea beetle View Post
    I think I would welcome it.

    -guaranteed Tax free cheque every month
    -brand new house for $5000
    -each of my kids, grandkids, and beyond would get $100,000 tax free when they turn 18
    -myself, my children, my grandchildren, and beyond could work tax free for the rest of our lives.
    -my children, and beyond would get a free education

    I could probably be back to where I am now in a generation, and would grow infinitely from there with no income tax. WIN, WIN!
    And this one Reply With Quote