Saline spots

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Saline spots

May 19, 2020 | 09:38 1 Man is there a lot of saline spots showing up anyone ever use black gypsum? Heard that might help.or is there something else? Reply With Quote
May 19, 2020 | 11:25 2 Lane Realty
Sheppard Realty
Hammond Realty.

Sorry for that. Reply With Quote

  • brs
    May 19, 2020 | 11:46 3
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Lane Realty
    Sheppard Realty
    Hammond Realty.

    Sorry for that.
    Sell in the winter, snow cover. Lol Reply With Quote

  • May 19, 2020 | 11:56 4 Seed canaryseed in the saline spots. 3 years in a row ..... pray to the alkaline gods. Worked for us. Reply With Quote
    May 19, 2020 | 12:07 5 Canary? Might have to try it. Does canary use the salt or its just tolerant to the salt Reply With Quote
    May 19, 2020 | 13:56 6 Don’t know, think tolerant but every year it grew in more and more until saline spot gone. Cheap to seed too. Reply With Quote
    May 19, 2020 | 14:28 7
    Quote Originally Posted by brs View Post
    Sell in the winter, snow cover. Lol
    That is Les Henry's best advice. If anyone would know of a better solution it is probably him.

    That is an unknown phenomenon in this area. If I can get rid of the water the low spots are the most productive soil. Without any amendments. Reply With Quote
    May 19, 2020 | 15:42 8 Tile will help on our land but I don't think it works everywhere and every time.

    Want to make money out of saline soil? Plant asparagus in it. It will grow well there. Reply With Quote
    Blaithin's Avatar May 19, 2020 | 16:37 9 Plant some cat tails and let it stay wet if you’ve been pumping it out. Stop driving through it and spreading it with the equipment.

    Wetlands are the salt filters of the area. By taking them out and seeding in them whenever we can, this is what we get. Reply With Quote
    May 19, 2020 | 23:31 10 You have water moving up from the water table and evaporating, leaving the salt behind. Tile reverses that flow and the water moving down to the tile will dissolve the salt and take it down with it. Plant tile, not asparagus. Reply With Quote
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  • makar's Avatar May 19, 2020 | 23:42 11 Here cattails plant themselves, and don't grow in saline. Reply With Quote
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  • May 20, 2020 | 00:21 12
    Quote Originally Posted by sumdumguy View Post
    Seed canaryseed in the saline spots. 3 years in a row ..... pray to the alkaline gods. Worked for us.
    sumdumguy, did you bother harvesting those spots or did you just disk it down to replant for next year? Reply With Quote
    May 20, 2020 | 05:23 13 We harvested them. We usually grew some canary so no big deal. Reply With Quote
    May 20, 2020 | 05:42 14 There is still water pressure in the ground.
    While many areas are seeing the topsoil turning dryer than what was experienced during the extreme rains of the first half of the decade 2010-2020, there is still a bunch of water looking for a home lower down.
    This pops up to the surface and as mentioned brings salts along with it.

    Till that quits or slows down it will be a loosing battle.

    What could bring some relief to the areas that are on the dry side could be some flushing rains that might take salts lower where that is possible. Regular rains could also dilute salts in areas with mild salinity and allow crops to grow.

    Might be best to quit putting expensive inputs into those areas. Nitrogen is usually abundant. Reply With Quote
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  • May 20, 2020 | 05:53 15 I would like to tile drain a slough that has some saline spots around it but I would have to move the water half a mile away to dump it into a marsh that sometimes flows off our land and further down stream. Between costs to move the water that far and pissing neighbors and people down stream off I hardly think it's worth it.

    Ironically, in some cases the only thing that grows in some of those spots are kochia and other weeds, then we take every measure possible(edge or authority) to control them and the spots lay bare without any vegetation, further exasperating the problem.

    Just happy we don't have a pile of it here in the Slum. Reply With Quote
    May 20, 2020 | 06:08 16 I had an area thirty years ago that grew nothing an old timer told me how to get rid of it. In the fall I worked it as deep as i could with the cultivator wing up two or three time and dried it out. In the spring i did the same thing. It was scheduled to be summer fallow that year and every time I worked it I worked that area deep as I could then worked the whole field the regular depth. Every time it rained I dried it out. the same thing the next spring before seeding. Grew canola on it that year and it was gone . New owners are still getting a good crop off it. His theory was to get the salt back down where it came from. salt was no problem in the early days because they plowed every spring and the hard pan was deep . Reply With Quote
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  • May 20, 2020 | 07:40 17 We have been using a ripper but only did one pass. Maybe a guy should cross rip? We're we have ripped couple times over seems to help but it doesn't fix over night that's for sure. Need a d11 with a 5 foot ripper Reply With Quote