What is the canola crush margin lately?

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What is the canola crush margin lately?

Apr 7, 2020 | 10:38 1 Soyoil has had a steady recovery from its bottom, canola price has been going up in CAD since that time, but without looking, that may not be much in USD. I believe it was farming 101 who posted that the crush margin was still very healthy even close to the bottom, it can only have improved since then, no?

As the risk of a late spring gets more realistic locally, and continued of lock downs start be become a real threat to supply chains and even planting in some areas, do we have room to move?

Received a special offer from an elevator this morning, haven't seen that all winter, and it is usually a good omen. Same with feedgrains, brokers started sending the usual end users are all filled up, price is softening right at the bottom, feed grains have recovered nicely since then, locally at least. Reply With Quote
Apr 7, 2020 | 11:04 2 Crush margin is down a lot since the end of 2019. The Jan contract at the time was around 120

It is now 80 for the May contract.

While bean oil was lower a bit ago it is still nowhere near the highs of 35+ that were around at the turn of the year. Soy meal recently took a plunge too.

It could be some pull is coming from the export market. Ship count is down a lot but there are still quite a few laying about and some will be for canola. Crushers are running at a good clip and may be trying to do a stock build ahead of weight restriction season. Reply With Quote
GDR
Apr 7, 2020 | 12:29 3
Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
Soyoil has had a steady recovery from its bottom, canola price has been going up in CAD since that time, but without looking, that may not be much in USD. I believe it was farming 101 who posted that the crush margin was still very healthy even close to the bottom, it can only have improved since then, no?

As the risk of a late spring gets more realistic locally, and continued of lock downs start be become a real threat to supply chains and even planting in some areas, do we have room to move?

Received a special offer from an elevator this morning, haven't seen that all winter, and it is usually a good omen. Same with feedgrains, brokers started sending the usual end users are all filled up, price is softening right at the bottom, feed grains have recovered nicely since then, locally at least.
Yep those buyers are always certain the system is right plugged up just before prices start to rise. Longer this crappy weather hangs on feed grains should be supported, canola maybe too. Seem to be in a wet and cold weather pattern for the foreseeable future. If it continues till seeding time there will be huge amounts of unharvested acres burnt or plowed down. Buyers have been counting on a big surplus of spring thrash which may or may not be there. Reply With Quote
Apr 7, 2020 | 12:53 4 Commercial stocks are not really burdensome when you consider over 200 thousand tonnes are in Thunder Bay and will head east Reply With Quote