Over reliance ....

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Over reliance ....

Apr 5, 2020 | 14:12 1 //youtu.be/vQx8cu2h8Hc
Last edited by furrowtickler; Apr 5, 2020 at 14:58.
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Apr 5, 2020 | 14:18 2 //youtu.be/MW_CtACw-qA Reply With Quote
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  • Apr 5, 2020 | 14:18 3 I've never experienced it but I wonder if this is what WWII felt like away from the front lines. Reply With Quote
    Apr 5, 2020 | 14:52 4 //youtu.be/pKmUxSlOoUE


    Interesting to watch from a non-north american media bias..

    Would like Mallee’s opinion on Sky News
    They have interesting reports for sure ....
    Last edited by furrowtickler; Apr 5, 2020 at 15:13.
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    Apr 5, 2020 | 15:15 5 //youtu.be/Z0_u7ySnPnM Reply With Quote
    Apr 5, 2020 | 15:24 6 Thank you furrow and sky news.Interesting comment from a person from Taiwan thinking over a million Chinese have died. Would make sense with the other death rates in other countries. Reply With Quote
    Apr 5, 2020 | 15:27 7 Got crap internet here overloaded slow as.

    But yeah don’t disagree we may have over reliance on China, but ain’t gonna change overnight like if countries want to go back to own manufacturing etc no issue but gonna be 5 plus years, things move slow.

    Yep all the infrastructure needed you guessed it will come predominately from China.

    Catch22

    Trying to think of Canadian example seed hawks all the steel is Chinese origin, base ore probably Australian Reply With Quote
    Apr 5, 2020 | 19:52 8
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    The commentator makes very good points in this SkyNews report. Peter Navarro made good points as well.

    Would negative comments about Communist China Party be allowed on Canadian airwaves?? Reply With Quote
    Apr 5, 2020 | 20:01 9 I bought some oak plywood - comes from China. 🙈 Reply With Quote
    Apr 5, 2020 | 21:19 10
    Quote Originally Posted by Oliver88 View Post
    The commentator makes very good points in this SkyNews report. Peter Navarro made good points as well.

    Would negative comments about Communist China Party be allowed on Canadian airwaves??
    Well it was almost refreshing to see something else other than our heavily censored media . Reply With Quote
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  • Apr 6, 2020 | 04:01 11
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Well it was almost refreshing to see something else other than our heavily censored media .
    Media ain’t to bad in oz. some reporters grate your gears but that’s life in general eh and truth is compromised.

    Errrr Internet forums are similar, check check and double check some of the claims on here but refrain.

    A Australian businessman interviewed today on radio said normality is returning to China but and here’s the big but cant import can’t export.

    Another comment he made re over reliance on China and the haters, well he said pea and thimble , India Thailand Taiwan will become least cost suppliers at chinas expense. Will just shift 15 yrs time everything will be made in India.

    Other comment I didn’t really realise he said China’s population need to eat whereas India to a large degree is self sufficient for food.

    He kinda went down the careful,what you wish for line.

    Do I agree or disagree still pondering but you know I’ve said world needs strong China. Strong USA India .

    Some suggest Putin is manouvering as well, he’s been kinda quite. Guess oil is his ace of spades, was gonna say trump card but might be misconstrued Reply With Quote
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  • Apr 6, 2020 | 05:10 12 Blame China, but how about blaming ourselves . . .

    Corporate America fed off of China. Just watch an episode of Shark Tank. Do they care about how China made product arrives globally? All they worry about is the landed price. How much profit can be made via cheap labor in another country and its ability to supply. That’s all that matters. Let’s let the good times roll . . . .

    We are sitting ducks because of our ‘feed me now’ mentality. This is not just medicines, this is everything including financial markets. What about rare earth metals? . . . the elephant in the room.

    This pandemic is a wake-up call. Consumerism will be forever changed. There is no snapback to the good old days of raging mind-blowing bank profits fed by bloated consumer debt. Now Wall Street banks are looking for bailouts. The spell of Trumpism stateside may take on a whole new meaning. Politics and what is important may become be a totally different beast. Feed me now mentality may no longer be as important. Reply With Quote

  • Apr 6, 2020 | 06:20 13
    Quote Originally Posted by errolanderson View Post
    ........The spell of Trumpism stateside may take on a whole new meaning......
    You have an audience - don't stop there? Reply With Quote
    Apr 6, 2020 | 07:33 14 Errol, you say consumerism is going to change, how? Will corporate NA change and how?

    Here are my questions

    1. Will consumers be willing to spend more of their disposable income on the necessities of life, or will
    there be no more disposable income?


    2. Will corporate Canada and America be willing to take less, but have those jobs onshore?

    3. Will unionized labor realize that if they quit asking for more and more and more those jobs that left will
    comeback?

    4. Will business and labor work together to achieve this?

    5. The big one, will consumers be willing to pay more for a food and medical supply chain that for the most part is in country? Reply With Quote

  • Apr 6, 2020 | 12:21 15
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    You have an audience - don't stop there?
    The political miscalculation and ultimate failure of American protectionism . . . . Reply With Quote
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  • Apr 6, 2020 | 13:29 16
    Quote Originally Posted by Misterjade9 View Post
    Errol, you say consumerism is going to change, how? Will corporate NA change and how?

    Here are my questions

    1. Will consumers be willing to spend more of their disposable income on the necessities of life, or will
    there be no more disposable income?


    2. Will corporate Canada and America be willing to take less, but have those jobs onshore?

    3. Will unionized labor realize that if they quit asking for more and more and more those jobs that left will
    comeback?

    4. Will business and labor work together to achieve this?

    5. The big one, will consumers be willing to pay more for a food and medical supply chain that for the most part is in country?
    1. We are already in the early stages of a depression. Disposable income? Those in a cash position have the power. Assets pennies on-the-dollar will create the green buds of the new economy in the years ahead.

    2. Corporations will take less because there is no choice. There is another shoe-to-drop. The S & P 500 index will have a total makeover over the next five (5) years. Its make-up may be unrecognizable by 2025.

    3. Those jobs will not come back. Technology and automation is overwhelming labour unions.

    4. They don’t have a choice. Both sides have lost power due to a changing consumer. Minimalism is starting to gain traction. Consumer debt and easy money from the banker is no longer hip. These are dreaded incoming consumer changes that make bankers cringe. Remember, the U.S. economy is made up more than 70 percent consumer spending. Corporate board of directors have some serious head scratching with a serious change in consumer spending.

    5. Consumers will become frugal and look for alternatives. Corporate America make be ‘up against it’ attempting to turbo-charge profits in this environment. This is an excellent question. One thing for sure . . . The consumer will decide, not politics (IMO). Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 07:59 17 Here we go again . . . .

    The Fed has thrown a bazooka at markets yesterday (now far beyond tactics used in 2008) to save U.S. stock markets from another crash. But just like 2008, the Fed is again throwing hedge funds an undeserved lifeline for their mistakes and greed and mistakes in corporate stock buybacks which artificially pushed stocks to historic highs with little to no fundamental backing. Valuations were ridiculous . . . .

    The Fed now has control of the entire U.S. bond market. Should stocks leg to fresh lows this spring; is the Fed going to start purchasing equities as well?

    Save Wall Street greed at any cost is again the motto . . . except this time, it just got a whole lot worse.
    Last edited by errolanderson; Apr 10, 2020 at 08:02.
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  • Apr 10, 2020 | 08:11 18 Keeping in mind we don’t have the domestic population to use our own resources up goods whether raw or manufactured have to leave here for wealth to happen. Or is that now wrong? Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 08:13 19 Don't know if this is relevant but Air Canada stock is up ....while their employees are paid by government and really no one should be travelling...??????? Reply With Quote
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  • Apr 10, 2020 | 08:40 20
    Quote Originally Posted by errolanderson View Post
    artificially pushed stocks to historic highs with little to no fundamental backing. Valuations were ridiculous . . . .
    Replace the word "stocks" with farmland and the same is true! Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 08:56 21
    Quote Originally Posted by wiseguy View Post
    What do you want farmland to be less than a combine or tractor !

    Get in the game !
    The combine and tractor aren't "worth" what they "cost" either!!! Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 09:10 22 moving manufactoring to Canada is not going to happen. Canada is becoming China we just about have marshall law hear, people can not think for themselves no more. people that can think for themselves are being villafied welcome to communist Canada. With comrad Trudeau in charge. Reply With Quote
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  • Apr 10, 2020 | 09:19 23
    Quote Originally Posted by wiseguy View Post
    Yes they are ! Equipment is going for more than new at auctions !
    Bulk fuel tanks, JD4020's, Degelman heavy harrows and land rollers don't count....😉

    It's the over inflated cost of new iron sitting on Stealer's lots that are supporting used iron. Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 09:39 24
    Quote Originally Posted by errolanderson View Post
    Here we go again . . . .

    The Fed has thrown a bazooka at markets yesterday (now far beyond tactics used in 2008) to save U.S. stock markets from another crash. But just like 2008, the Fed is again throwing hedge funds an undeserved lifeline for their mistakes and greed and mistakes in corporate stock buybacks which artificially pushed stocks to historic highs with little to no fundamental backing. Valuations were ridiculous . . . .

    The Fed now has control of the entire U.S. bond market. Should stocks leg to fresh lows this spring; is the Fed going to start purchasing equities as well?

    Save Wall Street greed at any cost is again the motto . . . except this time, it just got a whole lot worse.
    "Save Wall Street greed at any cost is again the motto . . . except this time, it just got a whole lot worse."

    You mean, save peoples Pensions? you mean save peoples IRA's, RRSP's TFSA's, Mutual funds?
    How low do you want all that stuff to go to? If it drops 10%, 25%, 50% even 80%,,, then what??? Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 10:03 25
    Quote Originally Posted by beaverdam View Post
    "Save Wall Street greed at any cost is again the motto . . . except this time, it just got a whole lot worse."

    You mean, save peoples Pensions? you mean save peoples IRA's, RRSP's TFSA's, Mutual funds?
    How low do you want all that stuff to go to? If it drops 10%, 25%, 50% even 80%,,, then what???
    The horse is long gone out of this corral . . . .

    Fed Keynes policies have done nothing but built an enormous unsustainable bubble that is now blowing sky high. The Fed is now in panic mode in an attempt to dose the flames. And it ain’t workin . . . .

    We are simply at the end of a capitalist business cycle that is in desperate need of refreshing, and it will refresh, Fed or no Fed. Yes, pension funds, retirement funds if exposed into high risk and asset values are now at-total risk. But this carnage would have been far less painful (IMO) had central banks simply gotten the hell out-of-the-way and let true economics rule. But now we have a much bigger (Fed built) financial problem and the pain begins whether the Fed injects $2.3 trillion yesterday or not.

    The green seeds of the new economy will again sprout Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 12:01 26
    Quote Originally Posted by errolanderson View Post
    The horse is long gone out of this corral . . . .
    The total stimulus injection into the US is about $12T. That's one country. Who knows what the rest of the world has done. Canada has put about $180B. We are short by a factor of 10 to keep a first world economy going. US can maybe afford this, but we cant. Either we will debt bomb ourselves or the peak of standard of living has been reached in this country.

    And remember, Trudeau killed dozens of resource projects that could have led us out of this. usually consumer spending leads a country out a recession, that's at the back end now probably a couple yrs out if it every returns to pre covid levels. Some people will be on the govt dole forever. Hundreds if businesses will not bother to reopen.

    Trudeau is so pretty for the cameras right now, he has no idea whats coming.
    Last edited by jazz; Apr 10, 2020 at 12:10.
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  • Apr 10, 2020 | 12:44 27
    Quote Originally Posted by errolanderson View Post
    The horse is long gone out of this corral . . . .

    Fed Keynes policies have done nothing but built an enormous unsustainable bubble that is now blowing sky high. The Fed is now in panic mode in an attempt to dose the flames. And it ain’t workin . . . .

    We are simply at the end of a capitalist business cycle that is in desperate need of refreshing, and it will refresh, Fed or no Fed. Yes, pension funds, retirement funds if exposed into high risk and asset values are now at-total risk. But this carnage would have been far less painful (IMO) had central banks simply gotten the hell out-of-the-way and let true economics rule. But now we have a much bigger (Fed built) financial problem and the pain begins whether the Fed injects $2.3 trillion yesterday or not.

    The green seeds of the new economy will again sprout
    "But this carnage would have been far less painful (IMO) had central banks simply gotten the hell out-of-the-way and let true economics rule."

    I agree entirely.
    Much pain ahead for many that expect it,,, but also plenty of pain for many, that don't expect it ! Reply With Quote
    Apr 10, 2020 | 12:46 28 See gold futures price moving up, anyone have prediction on currency values and status of $US as world reserve currency? Reply With Quote