saskpulse looking for appointed directors

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saskpulse looking for appointed directors

Dec 6, 2019 | 17:27 1 Not sure where this is coming from for appointment of directors since the last two elections have been acclamations ....

I guess they haven't got enough sucking on the checkoffs already...


Appointments cost more....

Maybe they will do a survey monkey to see if they should implement such an idea....Since the resolution to make checkoffs refundable got overthrown.... Reply With Quote
Dec 6, 2019 | 17:40 2 I see there was only 2300 that bothered voting in the sask barley election and a NFUer was elected? Reply With Quote
Dec 6, 2019 | 17:43 3 I will be waiting for the saskpulse appointment call.....hahaha.... Reply With Quote

  • Dec 6, 2019 | 19:43 4 What do you guys think of your new VP pf Gov't and Industry relations at CCGA? Will he suit the farmers best interests? Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Dec 7, 2019 | 06:48 5
    Quote Originally Posted by walterm View Post
    What do you guys think of your new VP pf Gov't and Industry relations at CCGA? Will he suit the farmers best interests?
    CCGA PRESS RELEASE

    ​​​​​Winnipeg, MB — Canadian Canola Growers Association (CCGA) is pleased to welcome Dave Carey as the Association's new Vice‑President of Government & Industry Relations, beginning in early 2020.

    "Dave brings a strong background in strategic leadership and government and industry relations to this new role at CCGA," says Rick White, Chief Executive Officer at CCGA. "We're excited he will be joining our team early in the new year. His experience working with various levels of government and collaborating with stakeholders across the agriculture sector will be an asset in serving Canada's canola farmers."

    Carey comes to CCGA after working in Canada's seed industry for more than seven years. He has held the position of Executive Director at the Canadian Seed Trade Association (CSTA) since 2017 and previously worked in roles involving government affairs, stakeholder relations, and policy at CSTA. Carey also spent time working on Parliament Hill as staff for several Members of Parliament.

    Carey holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Degree in Political Science from Brock University and a Masters Certificate from the Schulich School of Business at York University.

    In his new role, Carey will be responsible for managing relationships with government and industry stakeholders as well as advocating on issues, programs and policies that enhance the success of Canadian canola farmers. Carey's position will be based in CCGA's Ottawa office.

    CCGA represents more than 43,000 canola farmers on national and international issues, policies and programs that impact farm profitability. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Dec 7, 2019 | 07:11 6 Please listen to the 18 minute podcast, and this guy is to be on the Canadian Canola Growers Association

    https://germination.ca/dave-carey-st...-his-strategy/
    Last edited by farmaholic; Dec 7, 2019 at 07:32.
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    farmaholic's Avatar Dec 7, 2019 | 07:20 7 From the "Canadian Seed Trade Association"

    Dave Carey serves as the chief executive officer, reporting directly to the Board of Directors and oversees all day-to-day aspects of the association, including: strategy, advocacy, finances, staff and delivering value to members. He is a government relations, regulatory affairs, policy and international trade professional with extensive management and political experience.

    Dave joined CSTA in May 2012 and has held roles of increasing seniority focusing on stakeholder and government relations, regulatory affairs, policy development and international trade.

    Prior to joining CSTA, Dave held various roles on Parliament Hill as a political staffer with a particular focus on international trade. During his time on the Hill he was directly involved with moving three free trade agreements through the House of Commons and into the Senate and worked on two federal and one provincial election campaign.

    In 2018, Dave was nominated by industry and appointed by the federal government to serve as the Industry Co-Chair of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Seed Sector Value Chain Roundtab

    Dave holds an Honours Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science with a Concentration in Public Law from Brock University and numerous other university certificates. Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 08:09 8 We need quality directors - Tough ones like the originals. Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 08:36 9 Is it me or this guy all about fleecing farmers for his own gain. Reply With Quote
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  • Dec 7, 2019 | 08:48 10
    Quote Originally Posted by TASFarms View Post
    Is it me or this guy all about fleecing farmers for his own gain.
    It would be the latter....and his gain is probably a 6 digit salary to keep promoting the seed tax....

    You have organizations that have goals like 25mmt by 2025....

    No way to move it or process it....or a good return to producers but keep pouring inputs into it to grow a crop.... Reply With Quote
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  • farmaholic's Avatar Dec 7, 2019 | 08:59 11
    Quote Originally Posted by TASFarms View Post
    Is it me or this guy all about fleecing farmers for his own gain.
    Sounds like a bit of a chameleon to me!!!!!!! Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 09:31 12
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    It would be the latter....and his gain is probably a 6 digit salary to keep promoting the seed tax....

    You have organizations that have goals like 25mmt by 2025....

    No way to move it or process it....or a good return to producers but keep pouring inputs into it to grow a crop....
    The more tonnes we produce, the more check offs for the canola council to spend on palm springs vacations. Really, that is all that matters to them. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Dec 7, 2019 | 10:03 13 I suppose you could get rid of all the farm orgs, then hope the government, the railroads, other countries, SM5, grain handlers etc have our best interest in mind with no one from the farming sector pushing back at all. Brilliant.

    Hard to believe you're still having this ridiculous conversation. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Dec 7, 2019 | 10:51 14
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    I suppose you could get rid of all the farm orgs, then hope the government, the railroads, other countries, SM5, grain handlers etc have our best interest in mind with no one from the farming sector pushing back at all. Brilliant.

    Hard to believe you're still having this ridiculous conversation.
    Sounds good to me. Reply With Quote
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  • farmaholic's Avatar Dec 7, 2019 | 11:00 15 I was replying to Walter's question. Do you not find it a bit ironic where he came from and his "adgenda" and that the CCGA took him on? Is he going to be singing from a different song sheet now?

    Are some of the Orgs actually Farmer Advocates or Industry Agvocates?

    I don't think anyone is promoting getting rid of all commodity groups but there was definitely a call for consolidation.

    Also, in the link to the podcast that I posted Carey even talks of the need for a "united voice" amongst the CSTA(Canadian Seed Traders Association) members before the can get the NSA(National Seed Assiciation) off the ground.

    Damn right we should be having this conversation! Reply With Quote
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  • Dec 7, 2019 | 11:48 16
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    I suppose you could get rid of all the farm orgs, then hope the government, the railroads, other countries, SM5, grain handlers etc have our best interest in mind with no one from the farming sector pushing back at all. Brilliant.

    Hard to believe you're still having this ridiculous conversation.
    but ,... wtf would would be wrong with getting rid of all of them , and having one that REALLY WORKS for farmers
    we carried alfalfa seed over from 18 to try and get enough to break even , found out the alfalfa ass. doubled its check off to 1 cent and quarter, because times are tough, no shit ?
    so we stored it for a year , trying to break even , and they just skim nearly 2% off the top
    so i called and asked what work was being done on two very serious problems facing the industry, had to leave my questions on an answering machine
    no one even called back Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 14:35 17
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Please listen to the 18 minute podcast, and this guy is to be on the Canadian Canola Growers Association

    https://germination.ca/dave-carey-st...-his-strategy/
    So this guy is from Toronto, has an ARTS degree and is the VP of CCGA?......WTF
    Last edited by Oliver88; Dec 7, 2019 at 19:11.
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    Dec 7, 2019 | 18:20 18
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    I suppose you could get rid of all the farm orgs, then hope the government, the railroads, other countries, SM5, grain handlers etc have our best interest in mind with no one from the farming sector pushing back at all. Brilliant.

    Hard to believe you're still having this ridiculous conversation.
    Just list a number of things that these producer organizations have done to increase primary producers bottom line to keep pace with every input to grow a crop....

    If you can't understand that pricing crops from subsidized world markets is stealing your equity...well I won't explain it to you.... Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Dec 7, 2019 | 18:32 19
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    Just list a number of things that these producer organizations have done to increase primary producers bottom line to keep pace with every input to grow a crop....

    If you can't understand that pricing crops from subsidized world markets is stealing your equity...well I won't explain it to you....
    cant list much except endless studies on row spacing, seed depth, seed density, blah, blah blah. Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 18:39 20
    Quote Originally Posted by MBgrower View Post
    cant list much except endless studies on row spacing, seed depth, seed density, blah, blah blah.
    And the latest revelation is 8 year rotations.. Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 18:53 21
    That’s exactly what we need - an eastern political scientist. 🐖💨 Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 20:03 22
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    Just list a number of things that these producer organizations have done to increase primary producers bottom line to keep pace with every input to grow a crop....

    If you can't understand that pricing crops from subsidized world markets is stealing your equity...well I won't explain it to you....
    How do you know they haven't?

    Step away from Agriville and do some research on your own. Get educated. Reply With Quote
    Dec 7, 2019 | 20:30 23
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    How do you know they haven't?

    Step away from Agriville and do some research on your own. Get educated.
    How are appointed directors going to help?

    And since when are lower prices a benefit to western Canadian primary producers? Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Dec 7, 2019 | 20:33 24 I think the demise of the wheat pools began when they started hiring people from outside their core business....the so called smarter people.... Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Dec 8, 2019 | 07:28 25
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    How are appointed directors going to help?

    And since when are lower prices a benefit to western Canadian primary producers?
    Point is, those prices would be much lower without the interaction of the groups pushing back. How can you not realize this?

    One of the best things farms boards could do is have outside/non farmer board members. Like banking exec, industry exec, high level gov staff, etc to bring perspective to the board. Expertise beyond just the farm is very healthy. Reply With Quote
    Dec 8, 2019 | 08:58 26
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    Point is, those prices would be much lower without the interaction of the groups pushing back. How can you not realize this?

    One of the best things farms boards could do is have outside/non farmer board members. Like banking exec, industry exec, high level gov staff, etc to bring perspective to the board. Expertise beyond just the farm is very healthy.
    Yup ....exact same thinking as SWP....the only thing the expertise did was steal farmers equity....and SWP was never bankrupt....


    BTW how much lower do you think prices could be before farmers don't grow pulses....a lot of neighbors are saying no more pulses....because...

    1. No return for the machinery required
    2. Disease issues
    3. Rotation concerns


    Yup those appointed directors will know how to deal with those issues....but keep trying....
    Last edited by bucket; Dec 8, 2019 at 09:03.
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  • Dec 8, 2019 | 09:26 27 Since the directors are bringing this up.....who are they thinking of appointing?

    As a mandatory checkoff payer....I would like to know the candidates...

    If you want to appoint directors and I can't elect them but I am forced to pay....


    The group of 7 directors shouldn't be making these decisions unless it becomes a refundable checkoff....

    Then farmers have some say in it... Reply With Quote
    Dec 8, 2019 | 09:35 28
    Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post
    Point is, those prices would be much lower without the interaction of the groups pushing back. How can you not realize this?

    One of the best things farms boards could do is have outside/non farmer board members. Like banking exec, industry exec, high level gov staff, etc to bring perspective to the board. Expertise beyond just the farm is very healthy.
    Some outside business perspective is good but be very careful when getting non-farmers.
    Look at how Sprott and Pike made out in their Ag-ventures ran by “consultants and experts” sitting in urban office buildings. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Dec 8, 2019 | 11:07 29 Not taking any sides in issue just a question. Do you guys think it is better to pay for expertise by hiring consultants with check off dollars at what ever that would cost or to paying them full time salary at VP or director wage, what ever that would be (I haven't seen $ figure). Reply With Quote
    Dec 8, 2019 | 11:32 30
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    Since the directors are bringing this up.....who are they thinking of appointing?

    As a mandatory checkoff payer....I would like to know the candidates...

    If you want to appoint directors and I can't elect them but I am forced to pay....


    The group of 7 directors shouldn't be making these decisions unless it becomes a refundable checkoff....

    Then farmers have some say in it...
    Not really. They are voted in to make those decisions. Don't like those decisions, become a director. Reply With Quote