Attention Western Producer

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Attention Western Producer

Sep 11, 2019 | 05:44 31
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
wd9, I think there is way more traffic on this site than meets the eye.
I would think it's well read and monitored by people looking for "opinion".
I for one have got threatening calls from dealers after complaining about service , dont ever kid yourselves , everyone that matters is on here including ralphie Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2019 | 05:46 32 [QUOTE=caseih;423258]I for one have got threatening calls from dealers after complaining about service , , private messaging from ther WP, dont ever kid yourselves , everyone that matters is on here including ralphie, not that he matters to agriculture or sask /QUOTE] Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER's Avatar Sep 11, 2019 | 05:59 33 Oh hell the RCMP have questioned me once about one post from quite a few years back.

Mother Corp knows all.

But you know what? I could give a rats ass what businesses think or politicians etc.

Ralph ****ed up, and Trudeau is no saint.

Deere is the same overpriced crap as all the others.

Its a forum about ag and its not easy being a farmer. We are bottom feeders, and all the parasites do is feed off us. Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2019 | 06:15 34
Quote Originally Posted by SASKFARMER View Post
Oh hell the RCMP have questioned me once about one post from quite a few years back.

Mother Corp knows all.

But you know what? I could give a rats ass what businesses think or politicians etc.

Ralph ****ed up, and Trudeau is no saint.

Deere is the same overpriced crap as all the others.

Its a forum about ag and its not easy being a farmer. We are bottom feeders, and all the parasites do is feed off us.
Agree , and now that SHTF ... the very people that live off us .... have been silent on the commodity collapse partially caused by our federal government.
All you here is , big crop , big surpluses.... Canola going to $8 ..
Will be an interesting winter at the elevators and machinery dealerships now.
Also they are seriously phoning now to sell fertilizer while 80% of the crop is wet in the field , losing value beyond the 1970’s price of number 1 grades .
Thanks Ag Industry for sticking up for the farmers in Ottawa....... not , one fooking word hardly. Reply With Quote
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  • SASKFARMER's Avatar Sep 11, 2019 | 06:28 35 All is fine in Rural, they say. Sell your grain MR farmer the price is so low how low can it go. Oh no one is selling here is a carrot please sell.

    Equipment is moving, ok not but were telling people that. Buy buy.

    Fert is on sale; Ok take it now we have payments and need cash flow, please prebuy.

    Seed best and greatest canola available just like your dad grew probably the same stuff with only a liberty component or RR added to it. But we charged you dollars plus and were working on a flat price of a 100 an acre cost. Reply With Quote
    wd9
    Sep 11, 2019 | 08:07 36 All i tried to say is getting your story to decision makers and those with actual influence is the way to make change.

    I think this weather is driving everyone to the brink. Been too many years of it for many farmers. They said cheer up things could be worse, so i did, and sure enough things got worse Reply With Quote

  • blackpowder's Avatar Sep 11, 2019 | 09:54 37 I've been farming long enough I keep burying hired help, so ya, it can get worse lol.
    Agree, we're not very 'professional'. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Sep 26, 2019 | 21:06 38 Thanks Sean Pratt, for doing an article on carbon tax on grain drying fuel and letting the public know what a blatant tax grab it is Farmer slams carbon tax’s grain drying cost

    By Sean Pratt
    Published: September 26, 2019
    News
    0

    A producer from Saskatchewan says the carbon tax will increase his grain drying bill by $3,700 this year. | File photo
    Ralph Goodale questions ‘pollution pricing’ effect on fuel prices, 
but Saskatchewan producer calls it a scheme to buy votes

    Farmers across the Prairies could be drying a record amount of grain this year and some of them will be paying extra for that unwelcome expense.

    Glenn Helgason estimates he will be doling out at least $3,700 in carbon tax for drying down tough grain on his farm near Foam Lake, Sask.

    “I’m having a tough enough fall as it is with harvest and then, because the federal government wants to save the world, they’re throwing an 18.6 percent increase at me,” he said.

    “It’s going to Ottawa for Ottawa to send cheques out to the general public to buy their votes with my money.”

    Saskatchewan Liberal member of Parliament Ralph Goodale said most retail fuel prices have either come down or stayed flat in the wake of the carbon tax.

    “Forecasts of economic doom have not materialized,” he said in an email.

    Natural gas prices are half of what they were a decade ago. SaskEnergy’s price of 22 cents per cubic metre is only up three cents from last year.

    Goodale said every penny raised from “pollution pricing” stays in the province, some of which goes towards the Climate Action Incentive Fund.

    Saskatchewan farmers can access the $21 million fund to switch to lower-emitting energy sources on their operations, he said.

    But Helgason said money is being transferred from his pocket to the province’s wage earners.

    He is being charged $0.0811 per cubic metre of natural gas for delivery service, $0.09 for gas consumption and $0.0391 for the carbon tax.

    “I’m reducing carbon from the atmosphere and yet I’m getting charged a carbon tax to dry my grain,” he said.

    The federal Liberal government imposed its $20 per tonne carbon tax policy on Saskatchewan starting April 1. Saskatchewan is fighting it in court.

    Manitoba has its own policy that exempts farm diesel and gasoline in addition to fuels used for heating or cooling barns and greenhouses or to run grain dryers.

    Alberta scrapped its provincial policy and is fighting the federal policy in court, so there is no carbon tax in place in that province at the moment.

    The federal tax is expected to rise to $50 per tonne by 2022. By that time farmers like Helgason will be paying more for the carbon tax on their monthly SaskEnergy bill than for the natural gas itself if prices stayed at today’s levels.

    “You’re down and out and the government is right there to kick you a little bit more,” he said.

    Ian Boxall, vice-president of the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan, estimated the province’s farmers will be paying an extra 40 cents per acre to dry their grain this year.

    It doesn’t sound like a lot but there will be many acres of grain going through dryers this fall.

    “Our grain dryer is humming right now and so is all of our neighbours’ here in the northeast,” said the farmer from Tisdale, Sask.

    “There will be lots of grain dried this year, probably record (amounts) if it continues the way it is.”

    Boxall said the carbon tax is just another expense farmers can’t pass along to the end consumer.

    “It makes the added cost of grain drying more difficult to chew,” he said.

    Boxall wants whatever political party that wins the federal election to exempt all farm activities from the carbon tax, including grain drying.

    “There is no alternative. There’s no other option besides propane or natural gas to run our grain dryers,” he said. Reply With Quote
    Sep 26, 2019 | 21:07 39 except cluck cluck
    his dryer runs on solar Reply With Quote

  • Sep 26, 2019 | 21:30 40
    Quote Originally Posted by caseih View Post
    except cluck cluck
    his dryer runs on solar
    That loon likely agrees with Goodale regarding carbon taxing everything to change the weather. Reply With Quote
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