Fun fact of the day .....

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Fun fact of the day .....

Aug 13, 2019 | 12:45 1 Organic peas .....

No disrespect to Hobby or other who do a good job 👍

But this is the kind of train wreck that affects all fields within at least a 1/2 mile of this ....
reap what you sow ... fact of the day Reply With Quote
Aug 13, 2019 | 13:32 2 Big big money for those to go to the Hollywood plant. .. Reply With Quote
Aug 13, 2019 | 13:52 3 Peas? If all peas looked like that, we’d solve the over-supply problem 👍 Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Aug 13, 2019 | 14:22 4
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Organic peas .....

    No disrespect to Hobby or other who do a good job 👍

    But this is the kind of train wreck that affects all fields within at least a 1/2 mile of this ....
    reap what you sow ... fact of the day
    Just curious, how do you establish that it was intended to be a pea crop? I only ask because it is not immediately obvious from the picture. Perhaps those other species in combination were the desired species, and it is a bumper crop? Reply With Quote
    Aug 13, 2019 | 14:28 5 There is an organic farm close by that I drive by occasionally. Does a good job, has some thistles in one barley crop, and some alfalfa in another, but decent crops, and some really good hay this year. But something odd I noticed in the barley with alfalfa, is there are definite stripes of alfalfa, not random patches. and the crop itself has very definite stripes of better vs. worse. Which is quite common with fertilizer and either spin spreaders making a poor pattern, or air seeders which all seem to have sections with more and less. Same with alfalfa, nice straight strips look a lot like sprayer skips... Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Aug 13, 2019 | 14:39 6
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    Just curious, how do you establish that it was intended to be a pea crop? I only ask because it is not immediately obvious from the picture. Perhaps those other species in combination were the desired species, and it is a bumper crop?
    It was peas .... for the first two weeks
    Now one must walk out and find Waldo Reply With Quote
    Aug 13, 2019 | 16:18 7 Is it possible to grow peas organically ?
    Seems hard enough with weed and disease control
    It is a serious question , hobby , anyone ? Reply With Quote
    Aug 13, 2019 | 16:21 8 One feller here tried organic alfalfa seed production
    The plant bugs didnt leave enough to bale
    Maybe worse here cause of all the seed production? Reply With Quote
    helmsdale's Avatar Aug 13, 2019 | 17:04 9
    Quote Originally Posted by caseih View Post
    Is it possible to grow peas organically ?
    Seems hard enough with weed and disease control
    It is a serious question , hobby , anyone ?
    I've seen it done... most guys here seed it and if its clean it gets combined, and if dirty it gets plowed down for green manure. Reply With Quote
  • 2 Likes


  • Aug 13, 2019 | 17:12 10
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Organic peas .....

    No disrespect to Hobby or other who do a good job 👍

    But this is the kind of train wreck that affects all fields within at least a 1/2 mile of this ....
    reap what you sow ... fact of the day
    I keep hearing about these legendary organic farmers "who do a good job". Sighting one of these is right below "sasquatch" and "ogopogo" on my bucket list!

    Incidentally, that looks like my organic neighbors field of lentils. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Aug 13, 2019 | 19:21 11 I often say dirt must be 90% weed seeds. If you leave it untouched it is sold weeds. Reply With Quote
    Aug 13, 2019 | 19:21 12 Geez, that’s SOLID weed seeds. Reply With Quote
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  • farmaholic's Avatar Aug 13, 2019 | 19:23 13 But look at the diversity and the synergy that diversity creates for each species.

    Our peas are no screaming hell.

    Gotta wonder who is further ahead.

    We are actually combining this afternoon, after 1.42 inches of rain YESTERDAY. Ghetto farming at it's finest!
    Muddy tires. No splits or cracks. Retaining good color. Aeration.

    Life is grand...lmfao! Reply With Quote
    Aug 13, 2019 | 21:01 14 Have an organic neighbor with peas this year. They actually look pretty decent. Wild oats for sure, but not till after the rain, at which time the peas were well established.

    My best road guess would be 25 to 35 bushel.

    18 buck a bushel. Should do ok. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Aug 13, 2019 | 21:29 15 Name:  20190813_185126.jpg
Views: 410
Size:  95.7 KB

    After the peas it wait time again. Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 14, 2019 | 08:34 16
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Organic peas .....

    No disrespect to Hobby or other who do a good job 👍

    But this is the kind of train wreck that affects all fields within at least a 1/2 mile of this ....
    reap what you sow ... fact of the day
    Get off my land. You are trespassing. Reply With Quote

  • Aug 14, 2019 | 08:57 17
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Organic peas .....

    No disrespect to Hobby or other who do a good job 👍

    But this is the kind of train wreck that affects all fields within at least a 1/2 mile of this ....
    reap what you sow ... fact of the day
    A more serious answer.
    It looks loke not many peas in there. He/She still has the opportunity to plow it down.
    I can not say nor criticize what each individual organic farmer is doing because I don’t know and everybody has a different style.
    It does not effect a conventional farmer, they spray for weeds twice a year every year so that is a non issue. The only person that organic farmer is hurting is himself. In February I suggest you go make an offer to buy him out. Its that easy.
    I sold peas to the hollywood pea processor in Vanscoy (?). They use JGL commodities as a sourcing agent. My loads were 3 months late for pickup. I finally badgered those elusive bastards until they came for the grain. The trucks BOL destination was Moose Jaw.
    I did get paid in a timely manner but I am not fond of chasing buyers for 3 months past contract expiry to pickup the grain.
    This winter has proven to me that the organic market is getting lower priced and complacent.
    I have consistently recommended not to go organic. Pictures do not lie. Reply With Quote

  • farmaholic's Avatar Aug 14, 2019 | 09:08 18 A plowdown would probably be a good idea but even this conventional farming fool, as is me, knows it would best be done before weeds set viable seeds.

    I think organic farming requires as much attention to detail, if not more, than conventional Ag. Seeding a crop and turning their back on it probably doesn't yeild the best results. Doing what ever necessary within the organic rules and guidelines is......

    Plow downs don't control perennial(Canada & Sow) thistle roots, just probably makes them madder. At that stage they may have depleted root reserves but what organic farmers do after that to regain some control is beyond me. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Aug 14, 2019 | 09:12 19 Good post Hobby 👍
    My issue is that does affect those around , but so does big conventional farms that farm over a 50-60 mile radius that don’t wash equipment.... clubroot or thistles are spread in both cases ..... and very costly to manage Reply With Quote
    Aug 14, 2019 | 14:31 20
    Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
    Good post Hobby 👍
    My issue is that does affect those around , but so does big conventional farms that farm over a 50-60 mile radius that don’t wash equipment.... clubroot or thistles are spread in both cases ..... and very costly to manage
    With spring burn off and pre/post harvest applications of glyphosate farmers are easily managing thistles. Its cheaper than ever.
    Look at your headlands against the grid roads and you will see your own thistle problems.
    I have not seen a thistle patch in my neighbors fields and 100 mile radius for over a decade.
    Clubroot will soon have a spray when it gets more prevalent. You can’t stop canola production, that would be disastrous for farmers. Reply With Quote
  • 1 Like


  • Aug 14, 2019 | 14:39 21
    Quote Originally Posted by hobbyfrmr View Post
    With spring burn off and pre/post harvest applications of glyphosate farmers are easily managing thistles. Its cheaper than ever.
    Look at your headlands against the grid roads and you will see your own thistle problems.
    I have not seen a thistle patch in my neighbors fields and 100 mile radius for over a decade.
    Clubroot will soon have a spray when it gets more prevalent. You can’t stop canola production, that would be disastrous for farmers.
    Yes it is manageable, not sure on the possible fungicide, but new genetics built in the seed will be very effective if managed properly. Reply With Quote
    Aug 14, 2019 | 14:47 22
    Quote Originally Posted by hobbyfrmr View Post
    A more serious answer.
    It looks loke not many peas in there. He/She still has the opportunity to plow it down.
    I can not say nor criticize what each individual organic farmer is doing because I don’t know and everybody has a different style.
    It does not effect a conventional farmer, they spray for weeds twice a year every year so that is a non issue. The only person that organic farmer is hurting is himself. In February I suggest you go make an offer to buy him out. Its that easy.
    I sold peas to the hollywood pea processor in Vanscoy (?). They use JGL commodities as a sourcing agent. My loads were 3 months late for pickup. I finally badgered those elusive bastards until they came for the grain. The trucks BOL destination was Moose Jaw.
    I did get paid in a timely manner but I am not fond of chasing buyers for 3 months past contract expiry to pickup the grain.
    This winter has proven to me that the organic market is getting lower priced and complacent.
    I have consistently recommended not to go organic. Pictures do not lie.



    What is interesting is I can drop cows off at those guys and have payment after a couple cups of coffee
    ..and I watch them scale the animals. ...

    Grains shouldn't be any different... Reply With Quote
    Aug 14, 2019 | 20:39 23
    Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
    What is interesting is I can drop cows off at those guys and have payment after a couple cups of coffee
    ..and I watch them scale the animals. ...

    Grains shouldn't be any different...
    Verdient is in Vanscoy but the peas went to Moose Jaw. I am about 350 km from Moose Jaw. I did get paid, I found the logistics were odd. Reply With Quote