Change in Rotation

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Change in Rotation

Aug 9, 2019 | 08:16 1 I want to simplify my rotation. I am tired of working on the ground scraping lentils out of the gumbo and tired of bunching and burning flax straw. Tired of peas that usually lay down at harvest time. Tired of fighting weeds in these non competitive crops.

I want to go to a cereal (durum) - cereal (HRS or Barley) - Canola rotation and be done with it all.

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blackpowder's Avatar Aug 9, 2019 | 08:20 2 Kind of an "I have arrived" rotation.
Guys here do it. Usually after a certain age. Don't blame them one bit. Reply With Quote
Aug 9, 2019 | 08:28 3
Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
Kind of an "I have arrived" rotation.
Guys here do it. Usually after a certain age. Don't blame them one bit.
How about fall rye ....canola ....wheat/durum....

The lentil/ pea thingy doesn't have the returns to wreck any combine while the protein guys are sucking on a billion dollar fund....let them find pulses from farmers in other countries that are respected as part of the industry...and find out what the real cost of a pulse is.... Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 9, 2019 | 08:31 4
    Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
    Kind of an "I have arrived" rotation.
    Guys here do it. Usually after a certain age. Don't blame them one bit.
    I don't think of myself arrived at all even though I have been fing around at this for 25+ yrs. Just want simpler, easier crops with less potential problems. I don't think the returns are a whole lot different anyway when you count up the chem applications in pulses and maybe a 20-25 bu flax crop on average.
    Last edited by jazz; Aug 9, 2019 at 08:34.
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    farmaholic's Avatar Aug 9, 2019 | 08:51 5 Don't forget the value of a diverse crop rotation.
    Good things aren't always easy. Reply With Quote
    Aug 9, 2019 | 10:52 6 I quit canola for a time now as feeding parasites with 700 buck a bushel seed has become too rich for my blood.

    I would suggest faba beans, oats, flax, wheat/durum. Throw in some hay for a rotation break and take advantage of city horse ppl who pay whatever you desire for small squares. Pencil it out, I bet it would surprise you. That is thinking outside the box though. That is not allowed! Lol

    I don’t have anything like a set rotation. Different crop type to different crop type is all I do. Not like it works for me, not much does.

    Fabas stand four to six feet tall and the first pods are at least a foot off the ground, and straight cut like a dream. Cheap inputs, esp. with smaller seeded ones.

    They are a late maturing crop. And they do like water, lots of water. More water the better. Regina probably not ideal zone for them.

    FWIW.
    Last edited by Sheepwheat; Aug 9, 2019 at 10:54.
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    fjlip's Avatar Aug 9, 2019 | 12:28 7 This farm since 1974 has been cereals for a year or two then canola. Oh ya SMF every 4th crop till 1980. Min till since 1991, wheat canola. Simple less bin space, less drill/combine/truck/ auger cleaning. Just lazy I guess. Making enough money, paying income taxes. Life is short, which ever crop grows better, no need to grow 10 crops. For sure a few will lose money anyway. Someplace better suited for each crop. Choose wisely. 50 years experience FWIW... Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 9, 2019 | 16:57 8 Funny Jazz, been thinking the same thing over the last 2 weeks. I may have a couple years on you, but been driving around watching this crop mature, and thinking to myself,,,"why the _uck do you have all these different crops for", and like you're saying, some are difficult crops to manage and harvest,,,the rewards just aren't there anymore.

    I was thinking, durum-canola-oats

    Anyone know of a good oat variety that can be straight cut?

    Did think of barley too, but it would likely volunteer hard in your cereal crop, if I went with barley, I'd likely go with a feed type, I've had enough of the "malt games" over the years.

    Anyone know of a good feed barley variety that can be straight cut? Reply With Quote
    Aug 9, 2019 | 16:59 9 Oats for straight cutting. Legget, Betania, Camden have all been fine for me.

    Barley? All I can say is NOT champion. Reply With Quote
    Partners's Avatar Aug 9, 2019 | 17:15 10 The bly head I posted is synergy.
    So far standing very good.. Reply With Quote
    makar's Avatar Aug 9, 2019 | 17:40 11 Morgan oats straightcuts well. Reply With Quote
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  • Austranada's Avatar Aug 9, 2019 | 18:54 12
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    I want to simplify my rotation. I am tired of working on the ground scraping lentils out of the gumbo and tired of bunching and burning flax straw. Tired of peas that usually lay down at harvest time. Tired of fighting weeds in these non competitive crops.

    I want to go to a cereal (durum) - cereal (HRS or Barley) - Canola rotation and be done with it all.

    Comments?
    You and many others in the leading grain growing nations have or are hitting the wall. One problem is you are looking for a solution from the same level at which your current problem was created. Big pharma can only dazzle you with their latest promises for so long. Note that glyphoshit doesn't fit in the new model. Good luck

    https://theconversation.com/ipccs-land-report-shows-the-problem-with-farming-based-around-oil-not-soil-121643 Reply With Quote
    Aug 9, 2019 | 19:07 13 I tend to work on KISS principle a bit. But have livestock which complicates things or makes it easier??

    Sow a crop called vetch you may call it tares thats one break crop keep weeds out of it best you can and graze other legume is lupins on sand and canola as a standing crop. My three sown break crops. Other medic/clover pastures.

    But swing australia wide is more diverse rotations lentils beans peas lupins canola mustard chickies and supposedly world leader in breeding of lentils for dry climates. New chems coming online and old chems being relooked at so medium to high rainfall areas of aust cropping looks great.

    Dreir areas like mine diversify with stock added.

    Every farm is different as is farmers attitude to risk enthusiasm soil type frost risk etc etc Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Aug 9, 2019 | 21:41 14
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    I want to simplify my rotation. I am tired of working on the ground scraping lentils out of the gumbo and tired of bunching and burning flax straw. Tired of peas that usually lay down at harvest time. Tired of fighting weeds in these non competitive crops.

    I want to go to a cereal (durum) - cereal (HRS or Barley) - Canola rotation and be done with it all.

    Comments?
    I understand how you feel but we have the opposite problem here, not enough crop options, I just love travelling around and seeing what some places can grow. We just dont have the heat, light or season to grow anything interesting. Mostly cps/bly/canola rotation here. Some wet or frost prone land is really only good for barley and hay rotation.

    On varieties we will see but trying Sirish barley this year, supposed to stand well when pushed to the max. Know one guy who has fertilized it for a target yield of 165bpa, stood at 140ish last year he said???? Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 9, 2019 | 21:53 15
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    I want to simplify my rotation. I am tired of working on the ground scraping lentils out of the gumbo and tired of bunching and burning flax straw. Tired of peas that usually lay down at harvest time. Tired of fighting weeds in these non competitive crops.

    I want to go to a cereal (durum) - cereal (HRS or Barley) - Canola rotation and be done with it all.

    Comments?
    Lots of success here with wheat/canola wheat/canola . . . It literally has built farms. It’s not just for “coasters”. It has been “dazzling”!

    Spring wheat is the go to wheat. Winter wheat used to work for some but spring wheat at 85 bu/ac vs winter wheat at 65 quashed that.

    If barley is your choice for cereal Synergy or Connect have straight cut we’ll for us. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Aug 9, 2019 | 23:01 16 Someone told me the only rotation they want is to rotate out of the Industry...lol Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 10, 2019 | 00:10 17 Jazz ...
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  • Aug 10, 2019 | 00:15 18

    Non GMO ... huge market , in North America. Don’t have to worry about that fudging puttz of our PM screwing the market just yet cause Trump could care less about our Peter Pan .
    He has fudged every other market for western Canadian production Reply With Quote

  • Aug 10, 2019 | 11:46 19 No such thing as a perfect rotation, have to keep up with changes in demand for different crops and production, also input costs as well as own farm ability to compete.
    Local area has seen switch out of grass alfalfa mostly for beef production to straight grain growing, with simple canola-cereal rotation most common.
    Not seeing many new fences or newly seeded forage fields. Reply With Quote
    Aug 10, 2019 | 12:26 20 I like the “keep it simple” rotation. Crops that supposedly pay decent have to, the inputs are so high, which in turn has more risk than reward IMO.
    I know a lot of farms that grew durum on durum for years and made the farms they have today doing that.
    Growing pulses are extremely good for the land, but very damaging to equipment, which today is priced out of control.
    Not sure what they answer is? Reply With Quote
    Aug 10, 2019 | 12:40 21

    This was far more damaging in mid October than the nice dry peas we did in August last year .
    But ya most times you’re right bigzee Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Aug 10, 2019 | 13:03 22 BigZee....

    Things have changed a bit recently. Disease is a major concern and durum on durum on durum would be a recipe for a wreck if all three sides of the disease triangle are present with that kind of a rotation. Disease pressure wasn't too much of a real problem years ago.

    Even the tight canola rotations are stoopid. Clubroot isn't an absolute death sentence but for anyone farming long term why would you want to tempt fate? ....then complain about seed costs that have the latest and greatest "resistance".....ahem...I mean "tolerance".

    I would like more pulses in our rotation but root rots are wreaking havoc.

    I would like soybeans but they have issues here.

    I HATE growing flax but it is a very good break from other plant hosts that are affected by the same pathogens.

    Continuous cropping has been a good thing but it has come with it's own set of new challenges. What works in one area doesn't necessarily work in another.

    More sprayer time isn't a goal of mine, so if I can help mitigate some issues with a decent rotation...why not?

    No one made money summerfallowing or chem fallowing. So even if the margins are a bit tight on some crops in the diverse rotation, I still think it's better than a tight rotation or idle land. Haven't even considered a forage in rotation, there are fewer and fewer livestock guys around and even fewer dairy farms of which there was once many in this area, even the cattlemen here have resorted to growing annual crops for livestock forage ....seems they yeild more tonnes. Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 10, 2019 | 14:03 23
    Quote Originally Posted by Hopalong View Post
    No such thing as a perfect rotation, have to keep up with changes in demand for different crops and production, also input costs as well as own farm ability to compete.
    Local area has seen switch out of grass alfalfa mostly for beef production to straight grain growing, with simple canola-cereal rotation most common.
    Not seeing many new fences or newly seeded forage fields.
    Very true on making due with different crops, for one’s own situation. Some of us though like trying new things, wheat and canola is fine, but boring. Fine if boring pays the bills, but I am one of those who love studying and trying things others don’t try.

    Like your area, fences are generally coming down, cows get sold as new generation takes over. Barley canola oats is the order of the day around here. Bit of wheat.

    Makes me wonder personally as I am the only one building fences and planting land down to forages. Kinda nervous. 😂 Reply With Quote
    Aug 11, 2019 | 09:00 24
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    Very true on making due with different crops, for one’s own situation. Some of us though like trying new things, wheat and canola is fine, but boring. Fine if boring pays the bills, but I am one of those who love studying and trying things others don’t try.

    Like your area, fences are generally coming down, cows get sold as new generation takes over. Barley canola oats is the order of the day around here. Bit of wheat.

    Makes me wonder personally as I am the only one building fences and planting land down to forages. Kinda nervous. 😂
    Sounds like our neck of the woods too. More fences disappear than are built around here too. We’re bucking the trend too and some days I question it as well. At least yearling prices bounced back in the last couple weeks.
    Put up a mile last fall and 3/4 mile this year. Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 11, 2019 | 09:10 25 Woodland and sheepwheat - fence posts are the best thing you can plant LOL. Put up over 30 miles in 2 years - taking a breather with only a couple of miles of barb to replace with electric this year. Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 11, 2019 | 09:59 26 Nice fence woodland... do you guys use woven wire on all your fences. Reply With Quote
    Aug 11, 2019 | 11:24 27
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    Woodland and sheepwheat - fence posts are the best thing you can plant LOL. Put up over 30 miles in 2 years - taking a breather with only a couple of miles of barb to replace with electric this year.
    I hope you’re right! This year is the first year we are stealing grain land to make pasture. Grain farmer in me says take it easy you dummy. Shepherd in me says only that much?

    Good to have encouragement, grass, thanks. Reply With Quote
    Aug 11, 2019 | 14:11 28
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    Woodland and sheepwheat - fence posts are the best thing you can plant LOL. Put up over 30 miles in 2 years - taking a breather with only a couple of miles of barb to replace with electric this year.
    30 miles .......... was that yourself or a contractor? Hats off either way as there’s a lot of other work besides just the posts and wire. Usually we have to pull the old wire and doze fifty year old poplars to get back to square one before starting over which is more work than building it here.


    Our fence is on the right and the left is what it would’ve looked like before we started. Reply With Quote
    Aug 11, 2019 | 14:34 29
    Quote Originally Posted by blackjack View Post
    Nice fence woodland... do you guys use woven wire on all your fences.
    We’ve started doing that as it’s frustrating having calves out in the ditch especially along the pavement which is quite a few miles for us. The cost is a little more but the maintenance seems lower on the stretches that have been in for 30 years at home vs barb wire. Gone to 8 foot posts as well which helps in the hills a lot. Hopefully it’ll be a generation or more before it needs attention......... 😉 Reply With Quote
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  • Aug 11, 2019 | 14:54 30 Woodland...We have a new highway being built through our area so was thinking five wire but your fence ideas might change my mind.Thanks. Reply With Quote