sheepwheat holy hell

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sheepwheat holy hell

Jul 13, 2019 | 17:29 1 Farmers gets $9 but thats not my point getting way to pricey for consumers

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Jul 13, 2019 | 17:40 2 Crazy huh? Funny I am literally right now talking to a grocery store about carrying our lamb. Guess I’ll have to ask for those kind of prices. Lol I know their usual meat margin expectation, and am quite giggly if they go for it, because it would give us a very nice piece of the pie. Pretty hopeful.

But seriously, talk about pricing yourself out of a market. And we wonder why lamb sales struggle. That is plain crazy. Somebody making money there! Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 13, 2019 | 18:48 3 Sheep wheat ...you are too honest for your own good.... Reply With Quote
    Jul 13, 2019 | 19:07 4 I am generally honest. Too honest? I dunno, I guess I take that as a compliment?? Reply With Quote
    Jul 13, 2019 | 19:12 5
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    I am generally honest. Too honest? I dunno, I guess I take that as a compliment??
    Take as much as you can plus 10 percent....call it contingency funding ...in the engineering world that for bribes and profit....they won't even know they are using their own money for your advertising....hahahaha Reply With Quote
    Jul 13, 2019 | 20:10 6
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    Crazy huh? Funny I am literally right now talking to a grocery store about carrying our lamb. Guess I’ll have to ask for those kind of prices. Lol I know their usual meat margin expectation, and am quite giggly if they go for it, because it would give us a very nice piece of the pie. Pretty hopeful.

    But seriously, talk about pricing yourself out of a market. And we wonder why lamb sales struggle. That is plain crazy. Somebody making money there!
    Farmer direct sales here $15/16 per kilo slaughtered and packed

    If people knew hogget which is a lamb thats cut its first teeth is only a month older than lamb for 25% less thats what they will buy soon they will cotton on
    Last edited by malleefarmer; Jul 13, 2019 at 20:14.
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    Jul 13, 2019 | 21:30 7
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    Farmer direct sales here $15/16 per kilo slaughtered and packed

    If people knew hogget which is a lamb thats cut its first teeth is only a month older than lamb for 25% less thats what they will buy soon they will cotton on
    And yet we still commonly see NZ light lamb carcasses coming in to Costco in Ontario for under $100..... Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Jul 13, 2019 | 22:39 8
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    Farmers gets $9 but thats not my point getting way to pricey for consumers

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    No question it's expensive but there aren't very many chops on a lamb and they gotta sell the whole lamb. Guarantee they aren't selling lamb ribs or stew meat for 50/kg and all has to average out. And look at the price of good quality fish or prime rib, or the famous beyond meat stuff, all are out of reach for average consumer. Reply With Quote
    Jul 14, 2019 | 05:38 9
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    Farmer direct sales here $15/16 per kilo slaughtered and packed

    If people knew hogget which is a lamb thats cut its first teeth is only a month older than lamb for 25% less thats what they will buy soon they will cotton on
    Wouldn't the "wool on" instead?

    Seriously though I've never understood the lamb price in Canada being higher than beef - it was always way less than beef in Scotland - as it should be in my opinion as it's very much a secondary product.
    How is it priced relative to beef in Australia Mallee? Reply With Quote
    Jul 14, 2019 | 08:19 10
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    Wouldn't the "wool on" instead?

    Seriously though I've never understood the lamb price in Canada being higher than beef - it was always way less than beef in Scotland - as it should be in my opinion as it's very much a secondary product.
    How is it priced relative to beef in Australia Mallee?
    Lamb in Canada is definitely not a secondary product. It is much harder to find, it is what the richer people want. Canada imports half our lamb. So Canadian lamb is even more highly valued because people often want locally grown meat.

    If it was an inferior or secondary product, people would not pay 50 bucks for a rack at a restaurant, or 15 dollars for a half lb of shishliki!

    I think in Canada, lamb is an exotic type meat, sought after, uncommon, I mean, where is your nearest lamb in a grocery store, especially Canadian lamb? I know I cant find any. Consumers, especially rich consumers are very willing to part with their brass to get a hunk of it...

    Mutton can be an inferior product. I certainly get that. Even so, we have beaten out a market for our culls, and we get more money out of a cull than we do out of a lamb by making a specialty product that is in high demand.

    Which brings me to this: Breed matters. Wool lamb has its flavor, which for many can be offputting. Hair lambs have their flavor, much milder, and we have businesses buying our lamb, who have had nasty wool lamb experiences, because not everyone can hack it. I have met no one who dislikes hair lamb meat.
    Last edited by Sheepwheat; Jul 14, 2019 at 08:22.
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    GDR
    Jul 14, 2019 | 08:33 11
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
    Lamb in Canada is definitely not a secondary product. It is much harder to find, it is what the richer people want. Canada imports half our lamb. So Canadian lamb is even more highly valued because people often want locally grown meat.

    If it was an inferior or secondary product, people would not pay 50 bucks for a rack at a restaurant, or 15 dollars for a half lb of shishliki!

    I think in Canada, lamb is an exotic type meat, sought after, uncommon, I mean, where is your nearest lamb in a grocery store, especially Canadian lamb? I know I cant find any. Consumers, especially rich consumers are very willing to part with their brass to get a hunk of it...

    Mutton can be an inferior product. I certainly get that. Even so, we have beaten out a market for our culls, and we get more money out of a cull than we do out of a lamb by making a specialty product that is in high demand.

    Which brings me to this: Breed matters. Wool lamb has its flavor, which for many can be offputting. Hair lambs have their flavor, much milder, and we have businesses buying our lamb, who have had nasty wool lamb experiences, because not everyone can hack it. I have met no one who dislikes hair lamb meat.
    Your post started out ok, but then you did the same thing grassfarmer did. Are you part of some white hair sheep supremacist group! Do you have special hats and hand signals? Reply With Quote
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  • Jul 14, 2019 | 08:41 12 Hair sheep matter!! Reply With Quote
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  • GDR
    Jul 14, 2019 | 09:11 13 Sheepwheat we prefer to take the wool and hair off the animal before we eat it. If your customers are happy eating the hide good for you, earn you a few more pounds to sell! I think you have been fooled into believing a false marketing tactic, the response to which is hair sheep is more like eating an old Billy goat! Neither of which are true.

    For the record, what we eat as "lamb" in Canada has a very mild taste compared to much of the rest of the worlds production. This is because its grain fed (standard is min 19 days of barley) and young. (Most are butchered at 4 to 5 months of age and approx 110lbs) Considerably different product than imported that often is grass fed and twice as old. Not saying better just different.

    We often serve lamb to friends we know are certain they dont like lamb. Most can't believe how good our "beef" is. Lol. Reply With Quote
    Jul 14, 2019 | 15:55 14 Carcase weight last weeks sale yard lamb around the $8 lamb $6 hoggett per kg and cattle young steers $4 to 5 per kg carcass weight

    Most farmers country people who "know" there meat actually prefer hoggett which is usually 12 to 18 months of age way more falvour.

    Wool merino have less fat and are leaner than meat/hair lamb as you call it. Most prefer actually xbred a merino crossed with suffolk or border lecester.

    Re hoggett mutton there now calling it "aged sheep meat" and they hang it for n100 days some specialty butchers and get top doillar for it. All in the marketing.

    Its been statistically proven with the advent of cooking shows on TV geuss you get masterchef there been a swing or increase in red meat consump[tion. Not the bbq/smoking comps the "high end " cooking shows.

    But that might all change with these non beef burgers etc
    Last edited by malleefarmer; Jul 14, 2019 at 16:07.
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    Jul 14, 2019 | 16:06 15
    Quote Originally Posted by GDR View Post

    For the record, what we eat as "lamb" in Canada has a very mild taste compared to much of the rest of the worlds production. This is because its grain fed (standard is min 19 days of barley) and young. (Most are butchered at 4 to 5 months of age and approx 110lbs) Considerably different product than imported that often is grass fed and twice as old. Not saying better just different.
    Really? I've never seen anyone fatten that young lambs in Canada - nearly everyone I know with sheep lambs May/June and the lambs are fattened on barley and hay late the next winter - even the "grass-fed" direct marketers!
    In contrast in the UK the vast majority are finished off grass and their mothers milk starting at 3 months then progressively on grass alone, then maybe forage rape or some grain and later on root crops over winter but most are fat by 3-6 months off grass. New Zealand lamb is also grass produced at a young age and is likely the source of imports here. Reply With Quote
    Jul 14, 2019 | 16:09 16 im lost "Sheepwheat we prefer to take the wool and hair off the animal before we eat it. If your customers are happy eating the hide good for you"

    please explain Reply With Quote
    Jul 14, 2019 | 16:12 17
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    Really? I've never seen anyone fatten that young lambs in Canada - nearly everyone I know with sheep lambs May/June and the lambs are fattened on barley and hay late the next winter - even the "grass-fed" direct marketers!
    In contrast in the UK the vast majority are finished off grass and their mothers milk starting at 3 months then progressively on grass alone, then maybe forage rape or some grain and later on root crops over winter but most are fat by 3-6 months off grass. New Zealand lamb is also grass produced at a young age and is likely the source of imports here.

    Lamb feed lotting is bussiness here grass.

    Currently buyers are sourcing light lambs some guys weaning early due to lack of feed in some parts feedlotters buying straight of mum on farm and head to feedlot. Probably 90 to 120 days to get to 22/24 kg carcase Reply With Quote
    Jul 14, 2019 | 19:09 18
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    im lost "Sheepwheat we prefer to take the wool and hair off the animal before we eat it. If your customers are happy eating the hide good for you"

    please explain
    I believe he was teasing.. lol Reply With Quote
    Jul 14, 2019 | 19:17 19
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    Really? I've never seen anyone fatten that young lambs in Canada - nearly everyone I know with sheep lambs May/June and the lambs are fattened on barley and hay late the next winter - even the "grass-fed" direct marketers!
    In contrast in the UK the vast majority are finished off grass and their mothers milk starting at 3 months then progressively on grass alone, then maybe forage rape or some grain and later on root crops over winter but most are fat by 3-6 months off grass. New Zealand lamb is also grass produced at a young age and is likely the source of imports here.
    Yeah many ways to finish lambs. In our situation, we want near year round supply out of once a year lambing. Dumb luck has our flock producing varying growth rate lambs which helps a lot. Some lambs grow fast and are ready in 5 months to be finished. Some grow slow enough that they are yearlings and just getting there.

    Not the most efficient maybe, but it works here very well. Some finish on grass, some on hay and oats. We don’t see much difference if any in flavour texture etc. Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Jul 14, 2019 | 20:21 20
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    Really? I've never seen anyone fatten that young lambs in Canada - nearly everyone I know with sheep lambs May/June and the lambs are fattened on barley and hay late the next winter - even the "grass-fed" direct marketers!
    In contrast in the UK the vast majority are finished off grass and their mothers milk starting at 3 months then progressively on grass alone, then maybe forage rape or some grain and later on root crops over winter but most are fat by 3-6 months off grass. New Zealand lamb is also grass produced at a young age and is likely the source of imports here.
    All kinds of production models, same has happened to sheep as cows the last 15 yrs lots have moved to birthing in June for warmer weather but the traditional model here has been winter lambing. We lamb starting mid February, first lambs gone already the rest will be gone before the August 10/11 weekend as it's a big Muslim holiday and prices drop afterwards.
    Used to try for Easter lambs by lambing at Christmas time but have gotten later.
    Last edited by GDR; Jul 14, 2019 at 20:24.
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  • Jul 15, 2019 | 04:40 21 I sell lambs direct to this guy he feesd em and fattens em.


    http://www.thornby.com.au Reply With Quote
    Jul 15, 2019 | 13:35 22 i really like beef and lamb
    sure hard to get lamb in these parts
    i let other people eat the test tube shit Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Jul 19, 2019 | 19:19 23 Here you go sheepwheat, had baked lamb chops tonight. Couldnt even taste the wool! Lol. Reply With Quote

  • Jul 20, 2019 | 17:24 24 Weve had changes to lamb classification here in aust.

    “The current definition ‘a female, castrate or entire male that has 0 permanent incisor teeth’ means producers have no warning light about when a lamb stops being a lamb – the moment a permanent incisor erupts, that lamb is downgraded to hogget,”

    The new definition is ‘young sheep under 12 months of age or which do not have any permanent incisor teeth in wear’.

    This week there were lambs that made $355 per head.

    The lambs from well-known Forbes district producers Chris and Sharon Petropoulos and son Isaac had an estimated carcase weight of 45kg and skin value of $5, bring them out at about $7.80 a kg cwt. They were part of a consignment of 341 Petropoulos lambs that averaged about $300 in the sale. Reply With Quote
    Jul 20, 2019 | 20:29 25 Really 45kg deadweight? were they elephant sheep? About the biggest we ever sold were 27kg deadweight and they were big lambs.

    The best 45KG liveweight lambs in Scotland just now would bring about $170 your money. Reply With Quote
    Jul 20, 2019 | 20:53 26
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    Really 45kg deadweight? were they elephant sheep? About the biggest we ever sold were 27kg deadweight and they were big lambs.

    The best 45KG liveweight lambs in Scotland just now would bring about $170 your money.
    https://www.farmonline.com.au/story/...-a-head/?cs=61

    Id say at a guess there merino crossed with borderliecster mothers then mated back to white suffolks so 1/4 merino 3/4 british breed another guess 13/14 months old.

    Depends how you do your maths are you better to sell them at $230/50 and run more ewes hence more lambs or lower stocking rate to make space for growing out the lambs
    Last edited by malleefarmer; Jul 20, 2019 at 21:02.
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    Jul 21, 2019 | 08:51 27
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    https://www.farmonline.com.au/story/...-a-head/?cs=61

    Id say at a guess there merino crossed with borderliecster mothers then mated back to white suffolks so 1/4 merino 3/4 british breed another guess 13/14 months old.

    Depends how you do your maths are you better to sell them at $230/50 and run more ewes hence more lambs or lower stocking rate to make space for growing out the lambs
    Ok so they were really hoggets not lambs - what's with the guess the weight thing? Do you not at least weigh them liveweight at the auction? and WTF are "white suffolks"? Reply With Quote
    Jul 21, 2019 | 15:02 28 Nope not weighed at auction but most buyer producers are accurate within 2 kg

    Hoggett v lamb new grading system as mentioned above if a lambs just cuts its teeth its still a lamb but i was gfuessing. Only gives you a extra month

    Black face suffolk and white suffolk maybe you havent heard of them a i think "australia variation of black suffolk" to have better wool Reply With Quote