Soil PH

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Soil PH

Jun 15, 2019 | 07:32 1 What are you doing to adjust your in - crop PH? Since we have some of the most alkaline soils in N America, whenever the garden peas are looking pekid, they get a watering with vinegar. I haven’t heard if PH adjustment is being carried out in the field. Reply With Quote
blackpowder's Avatar Jun 15, 2019 | 07:36 2 Really what can you do.
Some here are trying calcium carbonate or gypsum. Early to tell yet.
Not cheap, only owned land.
Local dealer has a trial on my place.
We'll see.
I'd much rather move away from salt based fertilizer lol. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2019 | 07:40 3
Quote Originally Posted by blackpowder View Post
Really what can you do.
Some here are trying calcium carbonate or gypsum. Early to tell yet.
Not cheap, only owned land.
Local dealer has a trial on my place.
We'll see.
I'd much rather move away from salt based fertilizer lol.

Better talk to some older agrologists. ...I have had 300lbs of gypsum spread on some spots and I haven't seen results.... Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jun 15, 2019 | 07:59 4 Les henry. Reply With Quote
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    Jun 15, 2019 | 08:06 5 Not gonna help in crop, but for future what about elemental sulphur, takes years to break down and as it does releases sulphuric acid lowering ph. Also takes care of sulphur needs for multiple years.

    We have used vinegar on spruce trees also when watering as they like acidic soil. Reply With Quote
    Jun 15, 2019 | 08:12 6 Gypsum doesn't alter pH, but is good source of calcium and sulfur.

    Lots of elemental sulfur if you want to lower pH.

    Lime if you want to raise pH. Reply With Quote
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  • Jun 15, 2019 | 08:23 7 Around here, low pH is our problem, and unfortunately, the solution would cost more than the land cost to start with. In spite of the fact that we are so close to a bunch of limestone mountains, one is even named Limestone, and there used to be a company mining lime right in our nearest town, the trucking is cost prohibitive to get any lime here now. Lots of benefits to raising the pH here, aside from helping plants that don't do well in acidic soils, it really helps water logged soils, some research indicating a reduction in disease, particularly club root, nutrient release. Reply With Quote
    blackpowder's Avatar Jun 15, 2019 | 09:53 8 Doing the best job of plant husbandry you can do on your budget.
    The rest is up to the next glacier I believe. Reply With Quote
    Jun 15, 2019 | 09:53 9
    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
    Around here, low pH is our problem, and unfortunately, the solution would cost more than the land cost to start with. In spite of the fact that we are so close to a bunch of limestone mountains, one is even named Limestone, and there used to be a company mining lime right in our nearest town, the trucking is cost prohibitive to get any lime here now. Lots of benefits to raising the pH here, aside from helping plants that don't do well in acidic soils, it really helps water logged soils, some research indicating a reduction in disease, particularly club root, nutrient release.
    You're not real low ph then AF5. If you were you would have to be able to afford to remedy it to keep going. In Scotland we had to apply anywhere from 2-4 tonnes of ground magnesium limestone/acre on a less than 10 year rotation otherwise the ph was down at 3-4. Reply With Quote
    Jun 15, 2019 | 10:04 10 Here the PH is over 7(too alkaline). When we water in garden white rings form around watered area. Vinegar and water mix has been a cheap and easy way to lower PH in garden with easily noticed results in peas and tomatoes. If you google PH maps, it is very interesting. Eastern US is opposite of us in Saskatchewan. Reply With Quote