No Rain Til July 10th week

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No Rain Til July 10th week

Klause's Avatar May 23, 2019 | 09:13 1 In your area, what would that do as far as yield prospects / crop prospects?



I'm not sure there's enough ground moisture to hold us till then...


Hay would be a write off. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar May 23, 2019 | 09:17 2 Oh F off.

Really?

Like anyone knows for sure.

If it's a theoretical question....it would be disastrous. Reply With Quote

  • LEP
    May 23, 2019 | 09:20 3
    Quote Originally Posted by Klause View Post
    In your area, what would that do as far as yield prospects / crop prospects?



    I'm not sure there's enough ground moisture to hold us till then...


    Hay would be a write off.
    I think it was 2009 that it didn't rain here until June 26th. I remember mid June digging in the row and finding unsprouted seed and fertilizer prills. That was the year it didn't freeze until the end of September. There was a below average crop but quality wasn't bad. Reply With Quote
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  • May 23, 2019 | 09:25 4 Might be the most profitable option for me as drought ins would kick in and the net would be better than after harvest. Would be real hard on cattlemen,no rain is NO grass,
    I guess the welfare cowboys would be like me as they only have cows to keep the resource revenue comming in. Reply With Quote
    ajl
    May 23, 2019 | 09:39 5 This particular location east of Edmonton had no rain till June 19 in 2015. Early seeded cereals came up nice with good moisture at seeding and ran out of gas before rains came. Canola which was seeded later fared better as canola will respond if conditions improve later in the season. Some places got a lottery rain in May that year and had good crops. Reply With Quote
    May 23, 2019 | 09:45 6
    Quote Originally Posted by Klause View Post
    In your area, what would that do as far as yield prospects / crop prospects?



    I'm not sure there's enough ground moisture to hold us till then...


    Hay would be a write off.
    If I knew for certain no rain till mid July, I’d switch all incrop herbicide to glyphosate..... Reply With Quote
    May 23, 2019 | 09:57 7 I prefer the accuweather forecast although I've never found it to be that accurate. Tap switching on June 1st will be crucial for guys with cattle in many areas.

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    May 23, 2019 | 10:07 8 klause, where did you hear that forecast? Does anybody have anything from Drew Lerner? Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar May 23, 2019 | 10:14 9 Anything out more than three days is fucking noise.

    Did they/anyone know that high pressure ridge was going to block the last Montana/Idaho low from advancing north east? ...maybe three days in advance.

    Save yourself some grief and stress and live a day at a time. ....but have a plan! Reply With Quote
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  • helmsdale's Avatar May 23, 2019 | 10:16 10
    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    klause, where did you hear that forecast? Does anybody have anything from Drew Lerner?
    Same thing he's been saying since April... we(and they) need a high pressure ridge to set up in the mid west US. That'll push the jetstream north thereby pushing the storm track north. He's anticipating mid June at the earliest. Reply With Quote
    helmsdale's Avatar May 23, 2019 | 10:17 11 Rick Mercer's environment Canada 7 day forecast...

    https://youtu.be/wkDvqQKGgDA Reply With Quote
    May 23, 2019 | 10:40 12 Well if I compare it to one of the worst dry year that really sticks out in my memory 2002. That year we had very little moisture real high temps coming into spring and the crop hung on until the July long weekend when the temps went crazy high and really ended the crop for that year. This year with decent sub soil moisture and a way cooler temps so far, I think if we get decent rain by July 1 we would still get a crop but a smaller one. Reply With Quote
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  • May 23, 2019 | 11:49 13 Reply With Quote
    May 23, 2019 | 13:38 14 In our area and on own farm, silver lining would be getting into more slough margins and working them down.
    Remember past dry years when best crop came from slough edges and high water table areas if we had got or kept them in shape the year before.
    Some of them have been out of production for past ten years, newcomers might see them as not worth bothering with but not me.
    If we get more wet years, our hills and higher land production should make up for wet areas we lose. Reply With Quote
    May 23, 2019 | 15:32 15 Go get your fricken cash advance and don’t worry about weather or prices that advance is the solution both the liberals and conservatives think Canadian farmers need. No use having a decent insurance program. Reply With Quote
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  • May 23, 2019 | 15:53 16 I have rye and triticale seeded and if we don't get much rain I will cut all or most of it and bale it! I will buy hay with my crop insurance cheque and hold some of last years durum for a higher price and pay income tax next spring. Reply With Quote
    May 23, 2019 | 16:33 17 Now that that has been said, envy has our area in for a F-S-S rain event. The Norway site which is a Swede with his brains knocked out concurs that it will be two day rain event of an inch plus. It starts in a few hours. Can they be wrong?

    Of course they can, just like alarmists! They can be totally wrong. Reply With Quote
    fjlip's Avatar May 23, 2019 | 19:25 18
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    Oh F off.

    Really?

    Like anyone knows for sure.

    If it's a theoretical question....it would be disastrous.
    Maybe not that bad, Crop Insurance and NO harvesting required! Reply With Quote
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  • May 23, 2019 | 20:07 19 Not sure which is worse our situation or the one the farmers are having in the Midwest. I think I would take the too wet and don’t seed an acre and still get paid. We’ve spent a fortune hoping! Reply With Quote
    May 23, 2019 | 20:22 20
    Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
    I prefer the accuweather forecast although I've never found it to be that accurate. Tap switching on June 1st will be crucial for guys with cattle in many areas.

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    This one shows similar to that grass ...

    Time will tell I guess Reply With Quote
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  • May 24, 2019 | 05:56 21 My mom and dad were married in 1947. They told the story that the first rain this area had was the night of their wedding dance in the first week of August a thunderstorm hit. Dad said the crop germinated after the rain and farmers managed to cut enough for feed for the livestock but zero harvest that year. I cant imagine what that was like but it happens I guess. Farming practices have changed but no matter how I cut it if I had no rain until first week of August the crop would be toast. Reply With Quote
    LEP
    May 24, 2019 | 06:28 22 I have spent my entire life looking for the next rain.

    The life of a farmer. Reply With Quote
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  • farmaholic's Avatar May 24, 2019 | 06:31 23
    Quote Originally Posted by LEP View Post
    I have spent my entire life looking for the next rain.

    The life of a farmer.
    "Wouldn't it be nice if it didn't matter" Reply With Quote
    LEP
    May 24, 2019 | 06:32 24
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    "Wouldn't it be nice if it didn't matter"
    If it was easy everyone would do it. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar May 24, 2019 | 06:44 25
    Quote Originally Posted by LEP View Post
    If it was easy everyone would do it.
    "Farming isn't for the faint of heart or anyone who knows better" Reply With Quote
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  • May 24, 2019 | 07:12 26 Gettin dry ...
    Reply With Quote
    May 24, 2019 | 07:37 27 Some climate scientists are saying these persistent blocking patterns are due to a rapidly warming arctic and a decreasing temperature differential between the arctic and mid latitudes which makes the jet stream sluggish. It seems like the frequency of these blocking events is increasing. Wildfires, droughts and floods are increasing in frequency and severity.

    June is usually the wettest month. The crops start growing rapidly and releasing lots of moisture into the air. But the other ingredients need to be in place for significant rain. Reply With Quote
    May 24, 2019 | 07:42 28
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
    Some climate scientists are saying these persistent blocking patterns are due to a rapidly warming arctic and a decreasing temperature differential between the arctic and mid latitudes which makes the jet stream sluggish. It seems like the frequency of these blocking events is increasing. Wildfires, droughts and floods are increasing in frequency and severity.

    June is usually the wettest month. The crops start growing rapidly and releasing lots of moisture into the air. But the other ingredients need to be in place for significant rain.
    So it that what caused the SW part of North America to have a drought that lasted for decades??
    But the was several hundred years ago , before fossil fuels in think , but not sure Reply With Quote
    May 24, 2019 | 07:44 29 Hmmm all before the first oil well was tapped .....
    Reply With Quote
    May 24, 2019 | 07:48 30 I will just add to this to wet to dry debate.
    Quality of life is better when it’s dry. At least for this farm. Reply With Quote