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Mar 11, 2019 | 10:53 1 My Farmland explores how Chinese national and Chinese immigrants' investments are affecting traditional Canada’s agricultural sector by following three families: two in tiny Saskatchewan farming communities, the other in the wine-making region of Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont. The film tells a very human story of how communities react to an influx of people from a different culture who hope for a better life by working the land.

https://www.cbc.ca/cbcdocspov/episod...7ZhL-83ZPEHxGY

Looks like those offshore investors you bitch about are actual farmers trying to scrape a living out of the dirt same as you and me, how do you feel now? Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Mar 11, 2019 | 11:56 2
Quote Originally Posted by pourfarmer View Post
My Farmland explores how Chinese national and Chinese immigrants' investments are affecting traditional Canada’s agricultural sector by following three families: two in tiny Saskatchewan farming communities, the other in the wine-making region of Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont. The film tells a very human story of how communities react to an influx of people from a different culture who hope for a better life by working the land.

https://www.cbc.ca/cbcdocspov/episod...7ZhL-83ZPEHxGY

Looks like those offshore investors you bitch about are actual farmers trying to scrape a living out of the dirt same as you and me, how do you feel now?
.....and now for the rest of the story. I would bet there is more Investor yen dumped into shell(investment) farms than poor old Chinese immigrants trying to eke out a farming living off the land in good old Canada.

Pure speculation on my part. Reply With Quote

  • Mar 11, 2019 | 12:15 3 Probably buying from the likes of Pike or Boyd ..... Reply With Quote
    Mar 11, 2019 | 13:07 4 Driving some nice stuff for new farmers. Investor backed likely.

    Welcome to Canadian agriculture.
    Last edited by jazz; Mar 11, 2019 at 13:18.
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    SASKFARMER3's Avatar Mar 11, 2019 | 14:27 5 Easier to play farm with Lego than trying to win in canada.

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    blackpowder's Avatar Mar 11, 2019 | 15:01 6 Private ownership of land in China is illegal I thought. Although there is private farms.
    Keep in mind also, they plan ahead intergenerationally. So the integrity of the people here not in question.
    Question is, who holds the first dollar? And how do we maintain sovereignty over the next century.
    When will the people here no longer be loyal to those back home. Reply With Quote
    Mar 14, 2019 | 14:34 7 My Farmland airs tonight on CBC.

    If you have time take a listen to the interview with the director, Diana Dia.

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/chinese-canadian-farmers-are-facing-hostility-as-they-settle-in-rural-areas-a-new-cbc-doc-aims-to-change-that-1.5054953?fbclid=IwAR1mkDna05rw5_-on07VG3h0SAzfqwArVbRmjKxjPC_aqCuB8HhwD4yha-g Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Mar 14, 2019 | 14:50 8
    Quote Originally Posted by pourfarmer View Post
    My Farmland airs tonight on CBC.

    If you have time take a listen to the interview with the director, Diana Dia.

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/chinese-canadian-farmers-are-facing-hostility-as-they-settle-in-rural-areas-a-new-cbc-doc-aims-to-change-that-1.5054953?fbclid=IwAR1mkDna05rw5_-on07VG3h0SAzfqwArVbRmjKxjPC_aqCuB8HhwD4yha-g
    What time Saskatchewan time. Reply With Quote
    Mar 14, 2019 | 14:58 9
    Quote Originally Posted by pourfarmer View Post
    My Farmland airs tonight on CBC.

    If you have time take a listen to the interview with the director, Diana Dia.

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/chinese-canadian-farmers-are-facing-hostility-as-they-settle-in-rural-areas-a-new-cbc-doc-aims-to-change-that-1.5054953?fbclid=IwAR1mkDna05rw5_-on07VG3h0SAzfqwArVbRmjKxjPC_aqCuB8HhwD4yha-g
    Yup, sure. CBC. Sounds trustworthy. Reply With Quote

  • SASKFARMER3's Avatar Mar 14, 2019 | 15:06 10 The farmers from China on the big reserve by us are suppose to be turning the land back to canola wheat or barley and quiting the livestock operation in two years.

    Most others flipped from one to another with none farming.

    Land owners. Reply With Quote
    Mar 14, 2019 | 15:23 11 Would be fun to hear bto farmall's take on the chine farmers😂

    Edit: whatever happened to him anyway? Reply With Quote
    Mar 14, 2019 | 15:30 12
    Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
    Yup, sure. CBC. Sounds trustworthy.
    Wow. I'm not suggesting you to listen/read to it because CBC is trustworthy.

    We should be concerned how rural sask farmers and foreign land owners are going to be portrayed to the average Canadian. Who do you think is going to be the 'bad guy' of this story?

    But whatever Burnt, stick your head in the sand because their platform is CBC. Reply With Quote
    Mar 14, 2019 | 15:33 13 My mistake, it actually airs tomorrow the 15th.

    Says 9pm, I assume they mean eastern time because the world revolves around that time zone. Reply With Quote
    Mar 15, 2019 | 19:16 14 Well watched it. Don't feel sorry for the winery owners. They were dumb enough to think that money would flow like, well, wine. No clue about continual costs. Arrogance at its finest. Fire the long-term manager - yep, real smart.

    Felt kind of bad for the SK Chinese couple, but not really. Old man has happy fuzzy dreams from a kid and 20 years too late. Wife does not want to be there. Kids aren't much different than Canuckistan kids - gonna show the world what I can do with Dad's money.

    Don't feel sorry for the Ogema white farm boy. Married himself a horsie girl and you can tell where her priorities lie. Sell land, sell equipment, go get an off-farm job, as long as I can keep my horses happy. He sold family land, which I would think is unforgivable. I see Ritchie Bros. in his future, and a divorce. If he had stayed single with no kids, I think he had the ambition to be very successful. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Mar 15, 2019 | 21:48 15 Lots to say.
    The Chinese guy in Ogema shows up for opportunity, the same as my ancestors did over 130 years ago. Obviously he "apparently" doesn't have access to an endless supply of capital, ends up selling equipment, share cropping out land. I think it is a tougher farming area. Sounds like the wife/mother doesn't like the isolation of sparsely populated rural Sask. Would rather have her kids first class educated professionals than second class farmers....the status of each in China.

    The generational farm struggles as well. I question the choice to liquidate land he bought in order to cash flow the farm. Would he be any further behind farming what he owns with modest equipment. He might find himself spinning his wheels "working", paying rent and taking all the risk for the "Industry" and landlords.

    Ogema was "Assiniboia" Land Co birth place(burgeoning Sask land rush) , wasn't it? Maybe the Input Capital crew can finance these struggling enterprises! .....Full circle. Land prices escalating beyond it's ability to support itself!!!!!!! Frenzy! Has the pendulum swung too far?

    Farming can be ruthless, harsh and heartless....it takes no hostages. It should be classified as a disease or a mental health condition. Farmaholicism.

    The winery isn't in my wheelhouse, but "whinery" is....both can be intoxicating, lol.

    Maybe both Chinese families needed to invest in what they knew. Farming is a tough high risk gig, not for the faint of heart or anyone who knows better! Reply With Quote
    iceman's Avatar Mar 16, 2019 | 00:01 16
    Quote Originally Posted by 15444 View Post
    Don't feel sorry for the Ogema white farm boy. Married himself a horsie girl and you can tell where her priorities lie. Sell land, sell equipment, go get an off-farm job, as long as I can keep my horses happy. He sold family land, which I would think is unforgivable. I see Ritchie Bros. in his future, and a divorce. If he had stayed single with no kids, I think he had the ambition to be very successful.
    The ship sailed for that guy when his dad sold out. Not saying the son deserved to have it handed to him but how can one complain about competing and the local community dying when your own father sold out to them?

    But here’s a question for you guys.

    Why is it these guys who seem to get over extended always have fairly new machinery? Reply With Quote
    Mar 16, 2019 | 07:12 17
    Quote Originally Posted by iceman View Post
    The ship sailed for that guy when his dad sold out. Not saying the son deserved to have it handed to him but how can one complain about competing and the local community dying when your own father sold out to them?

    But here’s a question for you guys.

    Why is it these guys who seem to get over extended always have fairly new machinery?
    Why does the guy that rents as much as he can, think he is any different than the outside investor?

    Either way the community gets smaller.... Reply With Quote
    Mar 16, 2019 | 08:37 18 I give the guys from China farming in sask alot of credit. They seem like good people. The winery crew is a joke. The other sask farmer seems like he wants to be a bto and cant do it. Wants it real cheap. The Chinese guy and his family just go about their work. I'd have them for neighbors. And yes her horse hobby isn't cheap and the farm pays for that, wow get with it woman. Let's sell land to keep horses. Reply With Quote
    Mar 16, 2019 | 08:41 19 Farming is and will always be a tough life to try and raise a family the same time growing your farm.But today does not even come close to how bad the 80s and 90s were.It was 100% survival mode.most my age left and got good jobs in the city.Bought a quarter of land from a cousin that needed a down payment to buy a house.Banker told me it does not pencil out if I got it free.Bought it anyway and still have it.Think I bought 3 houses and down payment on another while settling with an older one along the way.looking back at all the land I wish I bought around me but reality was I could not afford it when it came for sale.Was just trying to pay and keep what I had.Can not turn the clock back.Just grateful I have land to sell at a decent price for my retirement. Reply With Quote
    Mar 16, 2019 | 11:19 20 I would argue that for some this new cycle in grain production is getting much more difficult than the eighties, wheat adjusted for inflation in 1985 was 15/bu, land financing then even with 15% rates were 98/ac on a 20 yr term vs 160/ac now and govt programs were much more liberal with the cash. Reply With Quote
    Mar 16, 2019 | 17:09 21
    Quote Originally Posted by phoenix64 View Post
    I would argue that for some this new cycle in grain production is getting much more difficult than the eighties, wheat adjusted for inflation in 1985 was 15/bu, land financing then even with 15% rates were 98/ac on a 20 yr term vs 160/ac now and govt programs were much more liberal with the cash.
    Cash flow was the tough one back then.drought grasshoppers and CWB marketing. Reply With Quote
    Mar 16, 2019 | 18:46 22
    Quote Originally Posted by newguy View Post
    Cash flow was the tough one back then.drought grasshoppers and CWB marketing.
    maybe so.....but a combine didn't cost well past $500000.00.

    It might have been tough but your are not talking the same amounts of money and grain hasn't appreciated the same way.

    Fucking spell check on this phone...
    Last edited by bucket; Mar 16, 2019 at 19:08.
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