Canadian grain Levies/Royalties

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Canadian grain Levies/Royalties

Mar 9, 2019 | 15:21 1 So im trying to work out whats the major issue in a nutshell with your proposal is it that epr is to high?
New wheats come out here and can be long gone after one year rare but happens but in 2019 for intance i think there are 29 new wheats barley oats canola beans you name it.

Im currently growing a wheat that was released 6 yrs ago suits me and will buy 2 or 3 tonne of fresh seed this year to bulk up my main barley is 5 years old and my oats is maybe 10 yrs again will buy a few tonne to bulk up.

Australia its 1.020 % is one grdc levy
Another 2 south australian levies 50 cents per tonne in total.
Then EPR which varies between $1.50 and $4 per tonne depending on release date of the crop.

Pasture seeds have a flat $15 per tonne.

Have a good mate who is a seed producer about 50 kms away.

Basically he gets little if any of the above EPR.

Routinely charges around 60% more for his certified seed which he sells. And actually has to pay all the above charges as well.

The hoops and hurdels he has to go through to certified seed accreditation each year is enormous and often his crop is "downgraded" because it didnt make the grade because a weed or test weight or seed weight, purity and im only talking a minute % of error specs are so tight he often wonders if its worth it. People out walking the fields looking for weeds etc or foreighn grain.

Many farmer actually prefer to buy his non accrrediated seed as its only about 10 or 15% than market price because of a small problem.

So again i ask its just the amount you guys are asked to pay? I know this has been done to adnaseum

Apologies for asking again Reply With Quote
Mar 9, 2019 | 15:30 2 I should add all new varityies are grown in ech district usually for 3 in trials then goes to seed producer for one year he may grow 20 acres or something and breeders check it all out before release.

Not unusual for new wheat or barley not to make the cut and is not released.

Few years back a wheat blitzed them in trials year one year two blitzed them again in most trials but showed some leaf disiease problems years 3 was mashed by leaf disease and didnt get released much to dismay of farmers as we said we could treat it with fungicides but breeders said would be ngligent if it was released and caused a rust epridemic by those who wont treat with fungicides. Reply With Quote
Mar 9, 2019 | 16:44 3 No 1 spring wheat is worth about $6.50-7.00 per bushel and seed growers will want $12.00-14.00 per bushel for No1 cert. I do not know what the seed royalties might be but they will be on top of that. At one of the seed meetings they talked about looking at Australia or England as a model to copy with tweaking it to make it Canadian. What ever that means?

I don't mind paying what we pay now if we get decent quality and most years we do but there are years when No1 cert. is nothing like No1 red spring that we sell. They can clean up some real ugly stuff that would be feed wheat and as long as they get the germ up to 85% they call it No1.

Not sure if I answered your question Malle Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Mar 9, 2019 | 16:48 4 Give an inch and they'll take a mile.

Where us my guaranteed ROI?

Anyone price out certified seed lately? Even with the extra costs of producing certified seed, there's got to be a margin there.

Certified flax is about $22/bu. Commercial is about $13.

Last year we paid $13 for certified CWRS.

I have a feeling there's a bit of margin there.

And the best for last.....$600.00 a bushel for certified treated(shitty treatment too) canola. ($12/lb X 50 lbs./bu) SCARY HUH! Reply With Quote
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  • Mar 9, 2019 | 17:05 5 Im suddenly thinking im missing the point to a degree and tell me if im wrong you guys get fresh seed every year???


    If thats the case i can see your dismay.

    As i stated above my seed was originally bought 5 to 10 yrs ago.
    \ Reply With Quote
    Mar 9, 2019 | 17:08 6
    Quote Originally Posted by seldomseen View Post
    No 1 spring wheat is worth about $6.50-7.00 per bushel and seed growers will want $12.00-14.00 per bushel for No1 cert. I do not know what the seed royalties might be but they will be on top of that. At one of the seed meetings they talked about looking at Australia or England as a model to copy with tweaking it to make it Canadian. What ever that means?

    I don't mind paying what we pay now if we get decent quality and most years we do but there are years when No1 cert. is nothing like No1 red spring that we sell. They can clean up some real ugly stuff that would be feed wheat and as long as they get the germ up to 85% they call it No1.

    Not sure if I answered your question Malle
    Appears we are way stricter in australia and it is called NO1 not by seed grower but a regulatory authority.

    If it dont make the grade they can sell it as commericial seed but at a discounted price. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Mar 9, 2019 | 17:31 7
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    Im suddenly thinking im missing the point to a degree and tell me if im wrong you guys get fresh seed every year???


    If thats the case i can see your dismay.

    As i stated above my seed was originally bought 5 to 10 yrs ago.
    \
    Nope, you don't have to buy new seed every year, except canola, and that is the model farmers are afraid will evolve over time for other grains.

    Maybe the SeedCos can't stand it that farmers can grow the seed they paid for, royalties included,year in year our until they decide to replace it with certified seed again. It would be like sending the vehicle manufacturer a check every year for the "privilege" of driving it.

    We went from, Shaw to Jatharia to Landmark in a relatively short period of time. All bought as certified then bulked up(as you say mallee) for our own use, following the recommondations of the varietie's stewardship agreement and not selling any brown bagged to anyone else like Tom4SeedTax accuses some people of doing. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Mar 9, 2019 | 18:34 8 Mallee.

    Could you tell us what you pay for canola, lentil, wheat(H1 class) and barley seed.

    Thanks in advance. Reply With Quote
    Mar 9, 2019 | 18:57 9 Your allowed to sell "brown bagged here" we call it over the fence trading and breeders i could be wrong but breeders always allow it after year 2. Seed comapnies still collect EPR and govt gets its leveies all at point of sale.

    Your other questions i will endevour to find out

    Edit when i say breeders allow thats the case not the seed growers who multiply it for breeders.

    Canola last year was $11 per kg Barley Seed $450 to 600 per tonne and wheat $450 to 800 depends on release date older ones way cheaper.

    Many many id say 25% of growers still grow open pollinated canola and keep seed just the same as wheat and barley hybrids another story of course.

    Are your seed breeders private or govt? Here think guessing there are only 2 govt breeders left ag colleges rest all private.
    Last edited by malleefarmer; Mar 9, 2019 at 19:04.
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    Mar 9, 2019 | 20:25 10 When we buy new now the seed grower says he has to pay a levy to the breeder allready and I think it bugs the hell out of then that I can get what I produce cleaned and keep using as long as I want.
    If the seed grower can produce something better than what I can i would buy new from him every year but he can’t so I don’t.
    He just wants to force me to! Reply With Quote
    Mar 9, 2019 | 20:33 11 We already pay check offs of wheat and pulses. Which are the same as end point royalties. Any over charges on freight are put back into research. Any fines or extra money that has been taken from Farms goes back to research not back to the Farms Reply With Quote
    GDR
    Mar 9, 2019 | 20:42 12
    Quote Originally Posted by seldomseen View Post
    No 1 spring wheat is worth about $6.50-7.00 per bushel and seed growers will want $12.00-14.00 per bushel for No1 cert. I do not know what the seed royalties might be but they will be on top of that.
    That 12 to 14 already has a royalty built into the price that the seed grower remits to the genetic owner. Im not sure the intention is to add more cost to that bushel of seed but instead change the way its collected to ensure that everyone using the genetics pays for the right to use it. I think most of the emotion and disagreement around the issue is for fear of the unknown. Perhaps some sort of cap to the max that can be charged regardless how its collected might alleviate some users concerns.

    As mentioned by others the biggest issue to me is the deregistration and the recent wheat reclassification that goes on without farmer say or control. If there are issues with varieties let the market decide, if its not market based then leave it alone!

    On a side note there is a premium to the seed grower, of course there is, there has to be or who would do it? I dont think its as big as most guys think after all costs in and the fact that most growers sit on good germ stuff a couple years to spread quality risk. I am a small farmer compared to lots on here but I buy new certified seed each year, for sure the economics are different on a larger scale. It just not worth the hassle of germ, cleaning storing and treating plus loss of screenings and I like to seed a few different varieties so that just multiplies the hassle. Reply With Quote
    Mar 9, 2019 | 23:53 13
    Quote Originally Posted by GDR View Post
    That 12 to 14 already has a royalty built into the price that the seed grower remits to the genetic owner. Im not sure the intention is to add more cost to that bushel of seed but instead change the way its collected to ensure that everyone using the genetics pays for the right to use it. I think most of the emotion and disagreement around the issue is for fear of the unknown. Perhaps some sort of cap to the max that can be charged regardless how its collected might alleviate some users concerns.

    As mentioned by others the biggest issue to me is the deregistration and the recent wheat reclassification that goes on without farmer say or control. If there are issues with varieties let the market decide, if its not market based then leave it alone!

    On a side note there is a premium to the seed grower, of course there is, there has to be or who would do it? I dont think its as big as most guys think after all costs in and the fact that most growers sit on good germ stuff a couple years to spread quality risk. I am a small farmer compared to lots on here but I buy new certified seed each year, for sure the economics are different on a larger scale. It just not worth the hassle of germ, cleaning storing and treating plus loss of screenings and I like to seed a few different varieties so that just multiplies the hassle.
    GDR\Mallee,

    GDR You hit the high points very well... including the 'demotion' of some wheat varieties after a couple of bad harvests[this should not have happened as grading could have solved any quality problems]. I received some 'stern' glances when I brought this up... so be it. New Varieties are normally about $1.40/bu royalty on Certified pedigreed wheat... so about $2.20/ac... average yield 1.2t/ac = about 1.90/t on royalty if EPR was in place... divide by 3... would be $.65/t/yr on an EPR like Aussies [Mallee] system. I figure the 'slippage' from those whom cheat... is reducing plant breeders royalties by 30-40% below these levels... so the folks who don't cheat are paying 30-40% more now... than if we went to an EPR system like Mallee [Aussies] use. I figure Certified Seed would come down by 15-20% if Canada went to an EPR system on commercial grain sales[back of napkin figures]. Thx for the question Mallee!
    Cheers Reply With Quote
    Mar 10, 2019 | 00:10 14
    Quote Originally Posted by TOM4CWB View Post
    GDR\Mallee,

    GDR You hit the high points very well... including the 'demotion' of some wheat varieties after a couple of bad harvests[this should not have happened as grading could have solved any quality problems]. I received some 'stern' glances when I brought this up... so be it. New Varieties are normally about $1.40/bu royalty on Certified pedigreed wheat... so about $2.20/ac... average yield 1.2t/ac = about 1.90/t on royalty if EPR was in place... divide by 3... would be $.65/t/yr on an EPR like Aussies [Mallee] system. I figure the 'slippage' from those whom cheat... is reducing plant breeders royalties by 30-40% below these levels... so the folks who don't cheat are paying 30-40% more now... than if we went to an EPR system like Mallee [Aussies] use. I figure Certified Seed would come down by 15-20% if Canada went to an EPR system on commercial grain sales[back of napkin figures]. Thx for the question Mallee!
    Cheers
    BTW... perhaps the CGC would be a good agency to collect a western Canadian EPR as they can easily audit and verify which variety is being sold[to the commercial grain buyer]... and charge the right EPR royalties [nothing on older public varieties, to say $.80/t on new high performing genetics].
    Just a thought. Reply With Quote
    Mar 10, 2019 | 01:03 15
    Quote Originally Posted by seldomseen View Post
    When we buy new now the seed grower says he has to pay a levy to the breeder allready and I think it bugs the hell out of then that I can get what I produce cleaned and keep using as long as I want.
    If the seed grower can produce something better than what I can i would buy new from him every year but he can’t so I don’t.
    He just wants to force me to!
    So the new "rules" are trying to stop you from using farmer saved seed each year?
    Still grappling with main contentious issue?

    Someone give it me in 2 easy to read and understand australian sentences Reply With Quote
    Mar 10, 2019 | 01:35 16
    Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
    So the new "rules" are trying to stop you from using farmer saved seed each year?
    Still grappling with main contentious issue?

    Someone give it me in 2 easy to read and understand australian sentences
    Thx Mallee,

    the 'new' "rules" are trying to implement an acreage levy [as well as the royalty on pedigreed planting seed]; when using farmer saved seed each year [hence a trailing levy]: when new varieties are grown[$1-2/ac perhaps which can happen without present UPOV 91/PBR laws needing to change]; which I am told recently may be accompanied with the present 'order in council' allowing the farmer saved seed provision being modified for easier enforcement;
    or
    An EPR on commercial sales by grain growers of cereals and pulses to grain buyers [new laws needed]'
    or
    remain the same as now... which would mean more enforcement to stop cheaters breaking present UPOV 91/PBR laws[which would also occur, in addition to trailing royalty acreage payment SCHEMES on agreements on farmer saved seed with declarations of all seed varieties planted required].
    Last edited by TOM4CWB; Mar 10, 2019 at 01:49.
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    Mar 10, 2019 | 06:58 17
    Quote Originally Posted by TOM4CWB View Post
    Thx Mallee,

    the 'new' "rules" are trying to implement an acreage levy [as well as the royalty on pedigreed planting seed]; when using farmer saved seed each year [hence a trailing levy]: when new varieties are grown[$1-2/ac perhaps which can happen without present UPOV 91/PBR laws needing to change]; which I am told recently may be accompanied with the present 'order in council' allowing the farmer saved seed provision being modified for easier enforcement;
    or
    An EPR on commercial sales by grain growers of cereals and pulses to grain buyers [new laws needed]'
    or
    remain the same as now... which would mean more enforcement to stop cheaters breaking present UPOV 91/PBR laws[which would also occur, in addition to trailing royalty acreage payment SCHEMES on agreements on farmer saved seed with declarations of all seed varieties planted required].
    So in a nutshell forcing us to pay for mediocre seed that doesn’t create a whole lot more value. Tax Reply With Quote
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  • farmaholic's Avatar Mar 10, 2019 | 07:54 18
    Quote Originally Posted by jimmy View Post
    So in a nutshell forcing us to pay for mediocre seed that doesn’t create a whole lot more value. Tax
    Who in their right mind advocates for higher costs for their business?

    I truly believe nothing will improve for primary producers. In time all we will see is an additional cost, initially maybe $2-5/acre and later with the possibility of having to buy new seed every year, who knows maybe up to $25-40/acre, pick a number...it will be what ever the market will bear.

    Stop treating grain producers like "shooting fish in a barrel"! Reply With Quote
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  • Mar 10, 2019 | 08:01 19 It's a great deal ....create many varieties and then after being on a commercial farm the true data comes out....

    Maybe western vicki can comment on varietal data when she pucks the new racehorse variety to support and then what happens when varietal data is incomplete.?

    GM tried having many vehicles of the same pedigree....silverado/Sierra. ..

    Acadia/enclave/traverse/etc

    And then the Pontiac line ....

    That silliness fucking near broke them.....actually it did.... Reply With Quote
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  • Mar 10, 2019 | 08:33 20 When a seed grower grows seed there is Royalty costs involved and are built into the seed price at the time

    Seed Royalty prices $1.50-$2 bu on average
    Application fees for growing seed
    Crop inspection fees
    Cleaning cost to clean to certified standard $1 bu plus
    Trucking cost to truck seed to seed plant
    Trucking cost to haul clean seed back for storage
    Screenings cost when you clean seed to certified standards you will have more screenings than cleaning commercial standards
    Use 15% as a average number
    Most screenings get sold into feed market at feed price
    Feed price is usually 1/2 or less of price of product
    Then you have extra work of cleaning air drills , combines , anything that handles the seed from seeding to harvest
    Extra work of isolation strips around seed fields
    Having to pay wages and have someone to load seed for customers or run a tractor so you can load seed when you are seeding in the spring time


    Will use a example of Durum this year

    Durum market price #1 $7 bu
    Inspection and application cost. $1 bu
    Trucking cost $0.65
    Cleaning cost. $1
    Royalties. $1.8
    Screenings loss. $0.50

    $11.95

    Certified Durum seed price on Average is $12 bu and get lower price if you buy bigger volume


    Lots of times we don’t sell all the seed that is produced and the seed gets sold commercially to the grain terminals. We don’t pay royalties then but all the other costs are still there.
    When a seed grower grows durum to produce certified seed they have to use registered, foundation or higher pedigreed to produce certified. The price of registered Durum would be $15 on average and $17 for foundation.

    Now that depresses me after typing in all these numbers as it looks like we will be lucky to break even with Durum seed this year.
    Last edited by Jagfarms; Mar 10, 2019 at 11:11.
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    Mar 10, 2019 | 08:46 21
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagfarms View Post
    When a seed grower grows seed there is Royalty costs involved and are built into the seed price at the time

    Seed Royalty prices $1.50-$2 bu on average
    Application fees for growing seed
    Crop inspection fees
    Cleaning cost to clean to certified standard $1 bu plus
    Trucking cost to truck seed to seed plant
    Trucking cost to haul clean seed back for storage
    Screenings cost when you clean seed to certified standards you will have more screenings than cleaning commercial standards
    Use 15% as a average number
    Most screenings get sold into feed market at feed price
    Feed price is usually 1/2 or less of price of product
    Then you have extra work of cleaning air drills , combines , anything that handles the seed from seeding to harvest

    Extra work of isolation strips around seed fields
    Having to pay wages and have someone to load seed for customers or run a tractor so you can load seed when you are seeding in the spring time


    Will use a example of Durum this year

    Durum market price #1 $7 bu
    Inspection and application cost. $1 bu
    Trucking cost $0.65
    Cleaning cost. $1
    Royalties. $1.8
    Screenings loss. $0.50

    $11.95

    Certified Durum seed price on Average is $12 bu and get lower price if you by bigger volume


    Lots of times we don’t sell all the seed that is produced and the seed gets sold commercially to the grain terminals. We don’t pay royalties then but all the other costs are still there.
    When a seed grower grows durum to produce certified seed they have to use registered, foundation or higher pedigreed to produce certified. The price of registered Durum would be $15 on average and $17 for foundation.

    Now that depresses me after typing in all these numbers as it looks like we will be lucky to break even with Durum seed this year.
    Thx nice break down. My question is why are seed growers so pro EPR. If farmers end up paying EPR on bin run won't they just elect to use more of their own bin run seed rather than from seed grower at current prices as long as germ and vigor is there.

    Will the result in lost sales be more or less than the system today including the small amount of brown bag seed sold from farmer to farmer. Reply With Quote
    Mar 10, 2019 | 08:49 22
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagfarms View Post
    When a seed grower grows seed there is Royalty costs involved and are built into the seed price at the time

    Seed Royalty prices $1.50-$2 bu on average
    Application fees for growing seed
    Crop inspection fees
    Cleaning cost to clean to certified standard $1 bu plus
    Trucking cost to truck seed to seed plant
    Trucking cost to haul clean seed back for storage
    Screenings cost when you clean seed to certified standards you will have more screenings than cleaning commercial standards
    Use 15% as a average number
    Most screenings get sold into feed market at feed price
    Feed price is usually 1/2 or less of price of product
    Then you have extra work of cleaning air drills , combines , anything that handles the seed from seeding to harvest
    Extra work of isolation strips around seed fields
    Having to pay wages and have someone to load seed for customers or run a tractor so you can load seed when you are seeding in the spring time


    Will use a example of Durum this year

    Durum market price #1 $7 bu
    Inspection and application cost. $1 bu
    Trucking cost $0.65
    Cleaning cost. $1
    Royalties. $1.8
    Screenings loss. $0.50

    $11.95

    Certified Durum seed price on Average is $12 bu and get lower price if you by bigger volume


    Lots of times we don’t sell all the seed that is produced and the seed gets sold commercially to the grain terminals. We don’t pay royalties then but all the other costs are still there.
    When a seed grower grows durum to produce certified seed they have to use registered, foundation or higher pedigreed to produce certified. The price of registered Durum would be $15 on average and $17 for foundation.

    Now that depresses me after typing in all these numbers as it looks like we will be lucky to break even with Durum seed this year.
    Thanks for showing numbers Jag without a bunch of rhetoric. Reply With Quote
    farmaholic's Avatar Mar 10, 2019 | 09:14 23 When I can no longer get any more income from the market the next thing I need to do is shave costs. Maybe some of the costs paid for producing certified seed need to fall! Take some of those costs up with the seed grower associations if they're too high. No one cares if the primary producer is profitable as long as everyone supplying goods and services is profitable and can take as much as the market will bear.

    How about the entities supplying goods and services make the adjustments for a change? But NO, no one wants to give up anything they've gained and established, well neither do I. How much waste in dead-beat dead-weight employees? How much waste in excessive advertising? How much waste in useless bureaucracy? How about thinner margins and belt tightening like primary producers are forced to do when finances get tight. Don't expect your customers to do anything you won't DO! Reply With Quote
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  • Mar 10, 2019 | 09:30 24 It came down to a very close vote at seed growers meeting. I don’t think 🤔 they are really sure how it’s going to work yet and they are still workin things out.

    The way it sounds like it will be in place for new varieties coming out after these new rules are in place is won’t effect varieties that are out now previous to the new rules coming into place.

    So when I sell seed as a seed grower of a new variety I will not have to pay royalties on the seed that I sell.

    The farmer that buys the seed from the seed grower will pay the royalties on the seed. Before the seed grower was paying the royalties for you and now the farmer will pay the royalties. The price of the Certified seed will be a lower purchase price from the seed grower if we do not have to pay royalties.


    If the farmer uses that new variety for seed the next year or years they will pay royalties on the amount of seed that is used for planting on thier farm.


    I’m Not sure what the Royalty amount will be.


    My views. It could discourage brown bagging seed as Certified seed prices will be more competitive than using your own seed for new varieties.
    If the farmer has to pay royalties on seed they use will they share the new seed technology with thier neighbors at no cost?

    In the future I think the seed companies will be checking seed varieties at delivery points and in the field. They can check varieties by doing DNA testing on the seed. Will have to have a record where the the farmer got the seed from. Reply With Quote
    Mar 10, 2019 | 09:56 25
    Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
    When I can no longer get any more income from the market the next thing I need to do is shave costs. Maybe some of the costs paid for producing certified seed need to fall! Take some of those costs up with the seed grower associations if they're too high. No one cares if the primary producer is profitable as long as everyone supplying goods and services is profitable and can take as much as the market will bear.

    How about the entities supplying goods and services make the adjustments for a change? But NO, no one wants to give up anything they've gained and established, well neither do I. How much waste in dead-beat dead-weight employees? How much waste in excessive advertising? How much waste in useless bureaucracy? How about thinner margins and belt tightening like primary producers are forced to do when finances get tight. Don't expect your customers to do anything you won't DO!
    I agree Farmaholic
    Disruption will occur ; of this there can be little doubt.
    If real tangible value is not the result of the administration and present baked in costs of Pedigreed seed ...in the future... as gene technology changes how we provide value...these efficiencies and productivity must add value ...to remain competitive with other countries providing quality products globally...
    I do not grow quality planting seed to justify the system that exists today.
    The end of this journey is to provide real tangible value to those farmers we serve with quality planting seeds .
    EPR collection of Plant Breeder royalty payment appears to provide maximum flexibility to transition new technologies and most efficient future and value solutions.

    This therefore is where the end will be required to be...
    Therefore your comments are valid and wise people people need to incorporate solutions for valid improvement to how we serve our community.
    Cheers and blessings.
    Last edited by TOM4CWB; Mar 10, 2019 at 10:07.
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    Mar 10, 2019 | 10:32 26 Tasf .. yes we have commodity checkoffs but likely less than half goes to research unfortunately because if 90% of it went to research i would leave our money in them. Reply With Quote
    Mar 10, 2019 | 10:35 27 Looks like auzzy’s Like using older varieties so they pay lower epr. I don’t here to many of them using all new varieties. Reply With Quote
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  • Mar 10, 2019 | 11:35 28 EPR encourages the plant breeder to populate the variety, for this reason, the Australian system supports "Brown bagging" with breeder applied rules.

    The farmer negotiation in Canada to define a better process is limp and ill defined: the process of testing varieties and providing data to farmers is insufficient. While Canada must remain competitive in the world, adding more costs without a direct link with varietal testing data it is just more cost. The last thing we need in the globally competitive environment we are catapulting into, is higher costs with no obvious gain. And it looks like the course we are on, as no producer groups have stepped up to negotiate the terms required to add millions of dollars in royalties to the costs of producing crops in Canada.

    As for the seed grower, we are seed growers, on our farm the single largest benefit we have had from growing seed is varietal awareness: picking the varieties and crops that give you incremental income gain either by yield, quality, harvest management and market penetration. And as a rule, shouldering the cost of kicking those out that look good in the book but perform shitty in the field (which is why better data is essential to supporting greater expense).


    Jag Farms provided an awesome summary; the cost of failed lots of seed is never cheap, but ever present.
    Last edited by westernvicki; Mar 10, 2019 at 11:42.
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  • Mar 10, 2019 | 14:16 29 "So in a nutshell forcing us to pay for mediocre seed that doesn’t create a whole lot more value."

    Im a simpleton well dont grow the new seed if you dont think its gonna perform simple as that or again am i missing something.

    Again not exactly sure of numbers but lets say there are 10 new wheat in australia for 2019 most are only equal to previous best or maybe 1 or 2% higher but may have other superior traits.

    None of them turn me on so will continue to grow my 5 year wheat but will get a coupla tonne to bulk up again to have clean seed for 2020 simple as that.

    If my neighbours try new ones and turn out ok will either get new seed from cert seed grower or get some from my neighbour and pay full epr at point of sale in the future 2020 or 2021 depending on how much i get if i do.

    Obviously this logic/system dont work in western canada. Reply With Quote
    Mar 10, 2019 | 14:22 30
    Quote Originally Posted by walterm View Post
    Thx nice break down. My question is why are seed growers so pro EPR. If farmers end up paying EPR on bin run won't they just elect to use more of their own bin run seed rather than from seed grower at current prices as long as germ and vigor is there.

    Will the result in lost sales be more or less than the system today including the small amount of brown bag seed sold from farmer to farmer.
    This is the big question.
    Why haven’t we heard any seed farmers speaking out against a seed tax?

    The optics are very bad. Reply With Quote