Looking for Hay Crop Advice

Beef Production

Tools

Looking for Hay Crop Advice

Feb 1, 2019 | 09:14 1 Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

I have a 20 acre parcel of land which is currently a very “tired” hayfield. It needs cultivation to get rid of a ton of ground hog holes. I would like to end up with a newly seeded, productive hayfield, but without using chemicals. As well, I would like a hay crop which can be harvested late (bird friendly - ie. first cut after July 15 - no second cut needed)

Can anyone suggest a process to achieve this? Do I just keep working it for a season to try and eliminate the weeds then seed it down in fall? Is there an interim crop I can put in to get rid of the weeds - I’ve heard you can do buckwheat without spray, but when is that seeded? What kind of seed would be good for the late harvest hay - it is intended for horses. I am located in Southern Ontario. Zone 4. Well drained soil.

Any details or suggestions would be much appreciated! I’m getting conflicting information on how to best proceed with this, so thought I would try online. Thank you. Reply With Quote
Feb 4, 2019 | 22:32 2 Similar situation, I have a small 10 acre field that needs to be redone. Plan is to work late spring, summerfallow and seed following year in late spring. Looking to go with either pure stand of Sainfoin or maybe mix in a little Timothy and/or Smooth Brome. Sainfoin would be ideal for a late single cut for you, as that is how it is recommended to be harvested. It is very high yielding, coarse feed that has a high sugar content, which makes it extremely palatable. Reply With Quote
Feb 10, 2019 | 16:22 3 A bit tough to give really good advice without a bit more detail, but...
If you are looking to renovate through direct seeding of forage into forage it might be worth considering spaying it with 2/3 rate of roundup to knock it back and then seeding directly into the sod.
If you are breaking it first, then oats are a good option for a year. Just make sure the seed bed if VERY FIRM prior to planting the next round of forages.
Other ways that can work include putting seed into mineral. Reply With Quote
GDR
Feb 11, 2019 | 09:43 4
Quote Originally Posted by smcgrath76 View Post
A
Other ways that can work include putting seed into mineral.
Have you ever tried that with a different species where you can actually tell if it works? Successful? Reply With Quote
GDR
Feb 11, 2019 | 09:51 5
Quote Originally Posted by newby View Post
Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

I have a 20 acre parcel of land which is currently a very “tired” hayfield. It needs cultivation to get rid of a ton of ground hog holes. I would like to end up with a newly seeded, productive hayfield, but without using chemicals. As well, I would like a hay crop which can be harvested late (bird friendly - ie. first cut after July 15 - no second cut needed)

Can anyone suggest a process to achieve this? Do I just keep working it for a season to try and eliminate the weeds then seed it down in fall? Is there an interim crop I can put in to get rid of the weeds - I’ve heard you can do buckwheat without spray, but when is that seeded? What kind of seed would be good for the late harvest hay - it is intended for horses. I am located in Southern Ontario. Zone 4. Well drained soil.

Any details or suggestions would be much appreciated! I’m getting conflicting information on how to best proceed with this, so thought I would try online. Thank you.
You got a bunch of roadblocks with your request but based on your wants I would break it up late summer and seed it to a winter cereal, the following year take the cereal crop off in whatever fashion you like (feed or grain) then reseed forage after either early enough to get 2 or 3 leaves or else wait until just before freeze up so it sits dormant till the following spring. Variety not sure. Reply With Quote
Feb 13, 2019 | 18:11 6 I’d work it down this summer and keep it black then seed to triticale next spring and make hay of it at the boot stage. Apparently this is great horse feed. Then sow your hay or pasture blend the following year. You need a good break between old and new grass. Out here we are a minimum 2 years of crops between old and new grass. Reply With Quote