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farmaholic's Avatar Jan 10, 2019 | 23:29 1 I have a bit of a problem with these services. But I guess if you're not guilty of anything or have anything hide what's the harm? I wouldn't voluntarily provide my finger prints for no good reason. I don't think law enforcement could take finger prints unless you faced criminal charges, it would be an invasion of privacy or maybe even "unconstitutional". Now people "pay" to submit their DNA for analysis "voluntarily"... likely with the "promise" it is secure with the testing company. I would bet those data bases are accessed for criminal investigation purposes.

Do the various types of DNA testing provide accurate information about where your ancestors came from or just a ball park area? How far back. People were also nomadic to some extent. Interbreeding through conquest or otherwise. Even specific tests for maternal and paternal lineage don't seem to be read the same or need different interpretation. What about genetic predisposition to disease and health problems.

I guess it could be a wonderful tool to genealogy if there are matches, but....


Interesting read Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 10, 2019 | 23:56 2 This is what the basic test will show, this is mine from paternal.Name:  FireShot Screen Capture #024 - 'Y-DNA - Migration Maps' - www_familytreedna_com_my_y-dna-migrati.jpg
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Jan 11, 2019 | 01:21 3 Very handy tool for us that are serious about genealogy. Good for about 8-10 generations back. Very accurate within first 4-5 generations. I know it certainly has helped me reach out to distant relations and fill in blanks. I am referencing with AncestryDNA as that was the platform I was already associated with for many years before DNA testing became mainstream. Can be pretty useless for those clueless about their family and barely know anything about previous generation, let alone the last 3 or 4. But everyone has their own reason for it. Some are doing research, some are trying to find a rich ancestor with no kin and some want to get the raw data for their code and see what nasty surprises (genetic diseases) their bodies have in store for them. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 05:41 4
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
I have a bit of a problem with these services.
So did Elizabeth Warren.

Name:  Elizabeth Warren.jpg
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Jan 11, 2019 | 07:06 5 Trump is actually a Mexican Muslim. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 07:10 6 15444, did you get more than one type of testing done?

Our family emigrated to this country alone, no other family members came. Just my Great Grandfather, his wife and kids. No brothers or sisters of the adults came. We were German Russians. They departed Europe from the port of Bremmen on the ship the SS Aller and arrived at New York, I had a copy of the ship's manifest photocopied from Sask Archives.

Church records used to play a big role in genealogy research but alot of people have abandoned the churches, they had birth, marriage and death records. I guess Vital Statistics is now doing all that. Reply With Quote
wd9
Jan 11, 2019 | 09:28 7 In the words of geneticist Adam Rutherford...

For deeper family roots, these tests do not really tell you where your ancestors came from. They say where DNA like yours can be found on Earth today. By inference, we are to assume that significant proportions of our deep family came from those places. But to say that you are 20 percent Irish, 4 percent Native American or 12 percent Scandinavian is fun, trivial and has very little scientific meaning. We all have thousands of ancestors, and our family trees become matted webs as we go back in time, which means that before long, our ancestors become everyone’s ancestors. Humankind is fascinatingly closely related, and DNA will tell you little about your culture, history and identity. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 09:34 8 https://www.theguardian.com/science/...dam-rutherford Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 10:20 9 Anyone grab a hair sample at last nights meeting, JT 🙂 Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 14:20 10
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
15444, did you get more than one type of testing done?

Our family emigrated to this country alone, no other family members came. Just my Great Grandfather, his wife and kids. No brothers or sisters of the adults came. We were German Russians. They departed Europe from the port of Bremmen on the ship the SS Aller and arrived at New York, I had a copy of the ship's manifest photocopied from Sask Archives.

Church records used to play a big role in genealogy research but alot of people have abandoned the churches, they had birth, marriage and death records. I guess Vital Statistics is now doing all that.
Neighbors were german/russians belonging to the old believers who didnt wash or shave, i quess explains the avatar. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 14:37 11
Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
Neighbors were german/russians belonging to the old believers who didnt wash or shave, i quess explains the avatar.
I am the closest living relative of the Neanderthal, and everyone thought they were extinct. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 14:48 12 So my father was married to his cousin and I’m married to my cousin,
Don’t like where this is going Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 15:08 13 I'm My Own Grandpa
Ray Stevens
Many, many years ago when I was 23
I was married to a widow who was pretty as can be
This widow had a grown-up daughter who had hair of red
My father fell in love with her and soon they too were wed
This made my dad my son-in-law and really changed my life
For now my daughter was my mother 'cause she was my father's wife
And to complicate the matter even though it brought me joy
I soon became the father of a bouncing baby boy
My little baby then became a brother-in-law to dad
And so he became my uncle though it mad me very sad
For if he were my uncle that would also made him brother
Of the widows grown-up daughter who was of course my stepmother
Father's wife then had a son who kept them on the run
And he became my grandchild for he was my daughter's son
My wife is now my mother's mother and it makes me blue
Because although she is my wife she's my grandmother two
Now if my wife is my grandmother then I'm her grandchild
And every time I think of it, nearly drives me wild
'Cause now I have become the strangest case you ever saw
As husband of my grandmother I am my own grandpaw
Oh I'm my own grandpaw
I'm my own grandpaw
It sounds funny I know but it really is so
I'm my own grandpaw
(Listen to this now)
I'm my own grandpaw
I'm my own grandpaw
I'm my own grandpaw Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 15:11 14 Wife and I used Ancestry and feel it is 100% accurate. They narrowed my DNA at 96% chance to a 100 mile radius in south Poland. Less chances in some parts of Ukraine, Germany and Baltic states. This agrees with grandparents histories on both sides. Paternal grandmother was born in Chicago in 1898, and they suggest shared DNA in that region too. Father's cousins are living there today. Cousin in Victoria on mother's side was linked correctly to my DNA also. We feel they are right on. Try it for fun if nothing else. As time goes o and more submit samples the greater chance of linking with relatives. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 17:39 15 Being adopted guess its of little use to me?

But found birth mother and new siblings but nothing on biological fathers side all know he was hungarian 5ft 11 heavy build approx 190lbs plus blonde haired blue eyed carpenter and first name was "beelah" not sure of spelling. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 18:12 16 OK, you guys. You give me a hunerd bucks, your name, your mother’s maiden name, your address. I can find enough information on you and the origins of your names to give you your familial information - very cheap. Furthermore, I wouldn’t give anybody on the internet my personal information. Just saying! Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 18:56 17 Are they doing this all from your DNA or from your name and many years of people posting geneology info.

Not sure if it was true or not, but told that someone had collected dna from their dog and sent it in with their own name and info and it came back saying that it was from region x, which is the correct region based on history and last names. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 18:58 18
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
I am the closest living relative of the Neanderthal, and everyone thought they were extinct.
Forgot to mention never cut his hair either. You may need the six hundred dollar test and watch out for black helicopters.
Last edited by makar; Jan 11, 2019 at 19:04.
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farmaholic's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 20:31 19
Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
Forgot to mention never cut his hair either. You may need the six hundred dollar test and watch out for black helicopters.
Black helicopters....schmelicopters....come and get me! They can read my cellphone GPS co-ordinates but not my thoughts through the steel plate in my head shielded by a tin foil hat.

Back on topic....

What a bunch of dead ends and forks in the geneology highway. Records can throw you off when surname spelling errors were made. When did VitalStats start recording info? Church records can be a good source of info. Early newspapers too. But like I said spelling errors can be tough. Interesting none the less. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 21:19 20 I got my church records from 150 years ago, now what do i do with 600 pages of handwritten ukrainian in greek alpha. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 21:37 21 So what's the furthest back any of you have traced your families? We have good records going back to 1690 of an ancestor on the same farm my Dad was born on. My cousin sold that farm in the 90s ending over 300 years of the same family there. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 22:07 22 I haven't dug that deep Grassy. Other than knowing we were Germans settled into the Kleinlebenthal area of Ukrainian/Russia. South of Odessa by the Black Sea: Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 22:08 23

.....only about 4° more south latitude than where we live now but likely a much more temperate climate. Probably God's farming country in the Ukraine.
Last edited by farmaholic; Jan 11, 2019 at 22:21.
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makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 22:16 24 Sounds like a fantastic place to live under better circumstances, unlike the warring army racetrack sandbar shithole we escaped from. Anyone what to see what my family came from watch the movie come and see, shows the sandy soil poverty swamps and the horror of war my family left behind endured. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 22:24 25 Ever look at this farma
http://www.grhs.org/chapters/gdo/villages/kleinliebental_odessa.htm Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 22:27 26 Makar, we were out of there before all the hell broke loose....made it to North America Nov 1886.

What area specifically did your family emigrate from? Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 22:45 27
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
15444, did you get more than one type of testing done?

Our family emigrated to this country alone, no other family members came. Just my Great Grandfather, his wife and kids. No brothers or sisters of the adults came. We were German Russians. They departed Europe from the port of Bremmen on the ship the SS Aller and arrived at New York, I had a copy of the ship's manifest photocopied from Sask Archives.

Church records used to play a big role in genealogy research but alot of people have abandoned the churches, they had birth, marriage and death records. I guess Vital Statistics is now doing all that.
No I didn't. It's not that I don't know where I came from, it's that the relationships with family from old country on maternal grandfather's side ended with him, so that connection is lost even though it's a mix of Prussian ancestry and a dose of royal blood from the Habsburg monarchy. And the Nazi's loved to burn records, so they are not much help either as many don't exist. It's going to be a lifetime of research to uncover anything from that side of the tree. DNA is a big help though. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 22:47 28 Corner of poland ukraine belarus, from belarus to the south of us the poleskie swamp and the ukraine, 15 miles west brest and the polish border, village was pozhezhin, apparently means burnt by fire. Swamp to south forest to the north, gramma said you had to look at what flag was flying in the courtyard to know what country you were from. Neighbors who come from south of the swamp in ukraine said lived in 3 diffferent countries and never left the house. Uncle went back in 1968 and was appalled at how much worse home was under the soviets. He thought communism was great till then since it was so bad before. How backward it was even though a major city was 15 miles away my dad saw his first car leaving for the boat in 1939. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 23:06 29
Quote Originally Posted by poorboy View Post
Are they doing this all from your DNA or from your name and many years of people posting geneology info.
Going from DNA. 80% of the people on Ancestry DNA have no family tree created and are not regular users - they are just trying to figure out where they came from. You would be amazed how many people know nothing about their family beyond their grandfather - and some not even that. Case-in-point, 3rd-gen cousin was shocked when I reached out to him through DNA. His father was raised staunch German Lutheran in Janesville Wisconsin and married a woman with Jewish blood in her from Silverton, Oregon (this all happened just after WWII). Well that caused his entire family (other than youngest sister) to disown him so my cousin had no idea that his father had so many siblings (8) or that his grandfather had a sister (my great grandmother). His dad never talked about family other than his sister. I could share many similar stories from other branches of my tree. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 23:16 30 Seen a program where in a town in england they were doing an ancestry DNA testing and had to quit as they found 50% of the ofspring didnt belong to both spouces. Guess thats why they call it jolly old england .EH Reply With Quote