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makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 23:18 31 Farma from bits and pieces i can gather we are cossacks, that being said in the time your family left my great grand father was in the czars army, cossacks were allowed freedom but had to serve in the army for a number of years for no pay, i am not sure some or all of the family, and often got land in return. I dont know how long he was in the army but its said he to old to marry when got out, but found a bride and made four kids after 40. He had 14 acres, from his dad or army service i dont know. We had half of that and would of had to divide by 3 for us to stay. What made your people leave. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 23:19 32
Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
So what's the furthest back any of you have traced your families? We have good records going back to 1690 of an ancestor on the same farm my Dad was born on. My cousin sold that farm in the 90s ending over 300 years of the same family there.
1340 on my paternal side going back to the old original Caino and Torp families of Finland, from which almost all Finns descend from. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 12, 2019 | 01:55 33 Grassfarmer, I have made no attempt to contact anyone in Russia or Germany. As mentioned earlier our family came over "alone" and no one has done much of any digging. I guess you could say I've done the most which isn't very much. How many records would have survived two European world wars and the other unrest on smaller scales.


Makar, thanks for the genealogy link and I did watch the movie, not subtitled but it was obvious what was going on. I am so glad to say we were out of there before that insanity started. It is almost embarrassing to say we're from German descent. Their diabolical cruelty is mind numbing. But at the same time it's all fascinating.

Makar again, I honestly don't know why they left the Black Sea area, maybe for the opportunity of land. The ship manifest describes his profession as "farmer". The husband(my great grandfather) was about 40 years old with a wife and two children, there were two more born in the district of Assiniboia in what at the time was considered the "North West Territories". They first homesteaded about 20 miles away from where we live now. He was killed in Regina in 1893. And one of the kids(born in the NWTs), present in the 1891 census isn't on the 1901 census. Neither grave has been located. So when the oldest son(my grandfather) was old enough to take a homestead they took one where we live now. Not alot of family history was shared from generation to generation. Supposedly my grandfather was a man of few words(but I'm making up for it..lol). His dad was killed, his youngest brother died, his other brother who he was very close to(and his brother's son) both died in the 1918 flu, his oldest daughter died in a house fire(she was staying in town to attend school)...there was alot of adversity in his life. And I have the nerve to complain! I have alot of gratitude and thankful he picked Canada, I've lived a very good life because of it. Things aren't always like I want but it could be very much worse.

....too much information?
Last edited by farmaholic; Jan 12, 2019 at 02:30.
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Jan 12, 2019 | 03:45 34 great interesting thread

we got back to the ole country i think to 1600s as well and nah family wasnt convicts.

Could say im lucky to be here actually adoption aside, my grandfather and 3 other brothers went to war in eygpt and gallipoli then into france and belgium. only grandfather came back and to original farm "soldier settlers scheme"

Its a bit confusing though as 2 brothers were there already and farm got granted to them next my grandfather and another brother joined war effort as well another youngest brother stayed home but had a fall from a horse and was never the "same" and waited till my grandfather got back from war effort. He passed away not to long after apparently about a year but according to my folks he was over come with grief about not joining war effort youngest had to stay home.

So different to youth and mindset of nowadays eh.
Last edited by malleefarmer; Jan 12, 2019 at 03:58.
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Jan 12, 2019 | 06:52 35
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
I am the closest living relative of the Neanderthal, and everyone thought they were extinct.
Nope. Not extinct.

You got cousins here in Ontario.

I know, it hurt's don't it? Reply With Quote
Jan 12, 2019 | 07:56 36
Quote Originally Posted by malleefarmer View Post
great interesting thread

we got back to the ole country i think to 1600s as well and nah family wasnt convicts.
It's relatively easy to follow records back in Britain to the 1600s - I guess that's a benefit of not being overrun in two world wars and records burnt in the chaos. Going back beyond that it gets a lot harder as the records were pretty scant. Reply With Quote
GDR
Jan 12, 2019 | 09:19 37 I bet if both SF3 and Grassfarmer had their DNA done they'd find out they were cousins. Thats why they're so much alike! Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 12, 2019 | 10:10 38 101, in your link "Charlemagne--- le grand formage"... chuckled. Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Jan 12, 2019 | 11:13 39
Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
It's relatively easy to follow records back in Britain to the 1600s - I guess that's a benefit of not being overrun in two world wars and records burnt in the chaos. Going back beyond that it gets a lot harder as the records were pretty scant.
You are correct, wife's adopted English side goes all the way back to 1600's! Impressive. French side also to the 1800's. Poland was ruined/burned/in several wars since then...all is lost. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 18, 2019 | 20:18 40 "Market Place" aired a not very flattering report on DNA testing services. They used a set of identical twins....the results had them statistically the same but results still varied, if that makes sense.

Vague results at best, the higher accuracy you want the more broad and vague results are.

Aren't some of you guys flattered to know you're related to me! Reply With Quote
Jan 19, 2019 | 09:36 41 Sister did test. Turned out pretty much as expected.
England Scotland northern European.a few smaller slices of southern Europe. And a trace of neanderthal.
My grandmas, both born 1888 one direct from Scotland, about 13 years old.
The other of English decent from Montreal to be born in winnipeg . Her dad was a vetranarian for the army / mounted police sent west
To quell the rebellions.
Fathers ,side, a pair of bros. And families Went to New York .from there one went to Australia. The other being
An empire loyalist , moved to nova Scotia.then decendands came west thru states on carts to winnipeg. The same time the railroad reached there. Farmed on the east side of winnipeg.
Grandpa moved to farm west of Biggar around 1911, my father was 2. Leading to a dozen kids and the dirty 30s.
Not the best move or timing. Reply With Quote
Jan 19, 2019 | 10:19 42 Ok my 2 cents worth. My parents family came here relatively late compared to some of yours, 1930 ish. What I dont get is why people feel the need to call me Ukrainian? I'm not. I was brought up in that lifestyle for sure with the language, food and work ethic but I'm canadian! I have never told my kids anything else either. A couple years back my wife and I were on a trip and my mom was looking after the two kids. They had a culture day at school and asked the kids to bring examples of what they were, regionally. My mom sent them to school with a Canadian flag and maple syrup. Everyone else came with things from every region of the world you could think of. When they were leaving the principal quietly came over and thanked my mom, the kids came as canadians. I have first hand knowledge of the "old country" I asked my baba one day if she ever thought of going back to visit family, she almost got angry when she said NEVER!!

One more thing, this may be controversial but I can tell you from experience, if the eastern European people hadn't come here to develop our great nation we would still be in the stone age. My dido lived in an upside down grain cart his first winter here, my neighbors told me that! They cleared bush by hand and broke the land we call home now. They faced hardships that will never be known to any other generation for the benefit of all if us now. Now everyone has their hand out and expects something for free. Immigrants and refugees today will never know, understand or care who built this country or what the personal cost was to do it, they just want to get here for the "easy life" Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 19, 2019 | 10:27 43 Like... Sk_wheatking.
It's what binds us to our forefather's land.
Maybe not always a smart business move but definitely an emotional decision. Reply With Quote
Jan 19, 2019 | 11:16 44 Identical twins sent their DNA to several companies. The results were inconsistent. Genetists commented that the results should be identical. So maybe take the information with a grain of salivasalt. JMHO Reply With Quote
Jan 19, 2019 | 11:35 45 Sk_Wheatking, my Dad would have agree with you. He insisted that we were Canadian, and would get into heated arguments with StatsCan about our nationality, when they wouldn't accept Canadian.

Of course, we also don't know where his Dad's family came from. None of them knew, or wanted to admit what their heritage was. And a lot of searching by one of Dad's cousins still couldn't solve the mystery. The best conclusion, and suggested by Grandpas youngest brother was "Pennsylvania Dutch" which basically means German at a time when it wasn't very popular to be German.

We know my Grandma's side all the way back to almost the Mayflower, and Grandpa's mother side back to Scandinavian Kings. Reply With Quote
wd9
Jan 19, 2019 | 13:05 46 Marketplace did a great show on DNA testing. Conclusion, it looks sciency, but what you are buying is entertainment. Its not tracing your heritage.

They sampled the host and her identical twin, very interesting. Reply With Quote
Jan 19, 2019 | 13:35 47
Quote Originally Posted by wd9 View Post
Marketplace did a great show on DNA testing. Conclusion, it looks sciency, but what you are buying is entertainment. Its not tracing your heritage.

They sampled the host and her identical twin, very interesting.

Awhile back there were reports that someone sent in their dogs saliva in and had results .....to the human species....that has to be accurate alright....but then again there are a lot of dogfuckers in society...lol... Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 19, 2019 | 13:48 48 Name:  Neandrathal.jpg
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This is the only picture of my Great Grandfather and his mother we could find. Reply With Quote
Jan 19, 2019 | 13:49 49
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
Name:  Neandrathal.jpg
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This is the only picture of my Great Grandfather and his mother we could find.
the one on the left look like your avatar....lmao... Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 19, 2019 | 13:50 50 Proof of bucket's theory.....

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Jan 20, 2019 | 16:58 51
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
Do the various types of DNA testing provide accurate information about where your ancestors came from or just a ball park area? How far back. People were also nomadic to some extent. Interbreeding through conquest or otherwise. Even specific tests for maternal and paternal lineage don't seem to be read the same or need different interpretation. What about genetic predisposition to disease and health problems.
I suppose there may be varying levels of quality to the services but I've heard too many stories about people sending in their cat's saliva and getting back a report saying their ancestors came from somewhere real to ever believe any of them. Testing your DNA for its "ancestry" has exactly zero to do with real genealogy. There's only one way to do that - it takes time and eventually it involves the Mormons. They have a fantastic database which is now available online. When I started - 40+ years ago - the only way to access their information was by visiting Salt Lake. That's actually fortunate because a trip to their library is an experience like no other. If you're serious about genealogy put the DNA test money towards a trip to Salt Lake City.

If you just want some entertainment then the DNA testing can't hurt anything unless your brother is a serial rapist. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 20, 2019 | 18:28 52 Thanks Bobofthenorth. As I started this thread out.... Unless you have something to hide, yadda yadda yadda. Criminally minded, yadda yadda yadda.

Law enforcement can't take fingerprints unless you are being criminally charged... and people are voluntarily submitting their DNA(the new modern day fingerprint) to DNA testing companies. If governments had their way, they would have every person's DNA on file. Please pass the tinfoil, thank you!

The MarketPlace show was an eye-opener in regards to it's accuracy nailing down ethnic lineage.

I haven't done a test but know people who are waiting for their results. I am close enough to say the results will be interesting but I won't be putting much stock in them.

In my opinion it will change absolutely nothing...
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fjlip's Avatar Jan 20, 2019 | 18:44 53 Well if you reread my post ours are 100% believable, connected me with a cousin on mothers side, confirmed paternal grandmother born in Chicago, wife adopted mixed race totally accurate. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 21, 2019 | 01:40 54 For farma from wiki on menonites sure applies to black hats to,In the 1770s Catherine the Great of the Russian Empire acquired a great deal of land north of the Black Sea (in present-day Ukraine) following the Russo-Turkish War and the takeover of the Ottoman vassal, the Crimean Khanate. Russian government officials invited Mennonites living in the Kingdom of Prussia to farm the Ukrainian steppes depopulated by Tatar raids in exchange for religious freedom and military exemption. Over the years the Mennonite farmers were very successful.

Between 1874 and 1880 some 16,000 Mennonites of approximately 45,000 left Russia. About nine thousand departed for the United States (mainly Kansas and Nebraska) and seven thousand for Canada (mainly Manitoba). In the 1920s Russian Mennonites from Canada started to migrate to Latin America (Mexico and Paraguay), soon followed by Mennonite refugees from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Further migrations of these Mennonites led to settlements in Brazil, Uruguay, Belize, Bolivia and Argentina. As i understand these people by a later czar were forced to leave for refusing military service, hence my funny dressing neighbors. Your families silience may be due to dropping whatever faith they left behind, i see it here today. Your surname may not matter, many changed it, as did a good old guy i know who passed way. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 21, 2019 | 01:50 55 Catherine the great brought in many germans because she was one, farmas likely left because things chaanged for whatever reason Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 21, 2019 | 11:31 56 Thanks Makar. I have the book Paradise on the Stepped by Joseph Height. Never read Karl Stumpp's book about German emmigration to Russia yet.
I doubt there is any Mennonite lineage in our blood because there is no lifestyle that would indicate it. We are Catlicks. Some smoked and drank alcohol.
We are probably similar to the German Nazi line...my kids once jokingly(?hopefully?) called me "Führer ____" LMFAO!

Edit in, still really don't know why they left the Black Sea region when they did. Shit hadn't hit the fan by then yet, that I'm aware of. Maybe there were signs and changes already happening when they decided to leave by 1886.
Last edited by farmaholic; Jan 21, 2019 at 11:38.
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