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Where would you go?

Jan 11, 2019 | 12:32 31
Quote Originally Posted by Sheepwheat View Post
Each generation as kids take over farms here, more cows are sold off. Because it isn’t physically easy like grain farming. Also, most that transition in these days, don’t have a huge need to stabilize income, or think outside the box, because they are riding on prior generations shirttails of success.

Mostly though, people are not into works no, they are into holidays, and mixed farming cramps their style too much, even if it could be successful.
Sheepwheat usually employs satire to convey his typically-substantive message.

Which is why this post is so confusing.

Turned blue in the face waiting for the punchline... Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 13:49 32 Jazz in that area nothing grew in the 80s drought Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 13:58 33
Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
Sheepwheat usually employs satire to convey his typically-substantive message.

Which is why this post is so confusing.

Turned blue in the face waiting for the punchline...
😀 Fair bit of poor punctuation and un noticed spell checks there. My apologies. I think I will delete and try again. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 15:59 34 Name:  kXvXmrB4TgWps1wiu9OI2A.jpg
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I would stay farming where I farm the cheapest land in Saskatchewan for what you can grow. Yes, we had two BTOs from Toronto and Calgary that couldn't make it and failed and a few really big Money guys that bought and sold. But still, we still are the cheapest place in Saskatchewan to purchase land.

I find it funny all the places were land has gone insane and our area with no real sellers has sat at a low level.

Oh well, it's good if you find some to buy and bad if your selling. But great grow great crops on low land value investment.

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Jan 11, 2019 | 16:15 35
Quote Originally Posted by burnt View Post
Sheepwheat usually employs satire to convey his typically-substantive message.

Which is why this post is so confusing.

Turned blue in the face waiting for the punchline...
Cow calf is a labour of love, a labour intensive lifestyle. Also if you have good grain land you could make way more renting it out than cow calf. Still lots of cow calf ranching in Manitoba around lake Manitoba on very marginal land. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 16:16 36
Quote Originally Posted by SASKFARMER3 View Post
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I would stay farming where I farm the cheapest land in Saskatchewan for what you can grow. Yes, we had two BTOs from Toronto and Calgary that couldn't make it and failed and a few really big Money guys that bought and sold. But still, we still are the cheapest place in Saskatchewan to purchase land.

I find it funny all the places were land has gone insane and our area with no real sellers has sat at a low level.

Oh well, it's good if you find some to buy and bad if your selling. But great grow great crops on low land value investment.

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how about up around PA ?? Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 16:26 37 Yes never worry about rain but frost could be an issue. longer days. Reply With Quote
Austranada's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 17:33 38
Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
See, now I knew Austranada was going to provide something useful eventually. He just tipped us off about the free land in Vologda Russia. My wife is still a Russian citizen, and I'm quite willing to get my naturalized citizenship, now all we need to do is convince this European friend of Pourfarmer's to buy our existing farm, it is dirt cheap compared to anything in Europe, and nearly on the frontier of the west, so it should be an easy sell.

The only catch is that most of Vologda province is farther north than any farm land in the Peace region of Alberta, some as far north as NWT, and looks like mostly bush. But at least it is close to St. Petersburg, so it should be an easy sell to convince my wife, it is an amazing city. Never visited the Vologda region, have been West of it and just slightly south of it, perhaps will go look next time we are over there and see what we are missing out on.

This is what Wikipedia has to say about Vologda Oblast Agricutlure:
The agriculture in the oblast is essentially cattle breeding with milk and meat production, production of eggs, growing of crops, flax, potatoes, and vegetables. In 2008, 73% of all agricultural products were produced by large-scale farms

Thanks Austranada.
Worth a look I'd say, you only live once. We left Canada behind over a decade ago. Conscious decision to get rid of political correctness, corrupt food industry, stag(nation), ........................
Miss playing hockey though but on the other I can play in Perth in one of three year round ice skating rinks where a lot of expats play

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makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 19:16 39 If inputs were free i could not take a picture like that on my land, something agronomists dont get. Reply With Quote
Austranada's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 19:51 40
Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
If inputs were free i could not take a picture like that on my land, something agronomists dont get.
What doesn't your agronomist get? Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 19:56 41
Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
If inputs were free i could not take a picture like that on my land, something agronomists dont get.
Where exactly are you Makar? Somewhere in Peace, right? My impression of most areas of the Peace that I have seen are flat perfect black soil, but I probably haven't been far enough off the beaten path. What are the limitation as you get further towards the fringes, is it climate, soil, muskeg? Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 19:57 42
Quote Originally Posted by Austranada View Post
What doesn't your agronomist get?
I dont farm sf3 dirt and farm closer to santa than him. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 20:08 43
Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
Where exactly are you Makar? Somewhere in Peace, right? My impression of most areas of the Peace that I have seen are flat perfect black soil, but I probably haven't been far enough off the beaten path. What are the limitation as you get further towards the fringes, is it climate, soil, muskeg?
All of the above, things change quarter to quarter and within that, nothing flat perfect or black here, white as snow fire burnt in the last century full of potholes, one dumb fat blonde told my why do i bitch, i have 6 to 8 percent om , , well i dont i can show a soil sample with 1 percent om and i dont think they use fractions, plus the climate wreck, its is so variable here i have two quarters half mile apart with a 10 bushel difference. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 20:10 44 Romania.. sorry, I would go to Romania. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 20:15 45 Everyone dreams of farming new broke land, well on the first farm i bought dad went out on new breaking with a deep tillage cultivator in the spring with shovels and it skidded all the way around first pass, went home and put spikes on, how many understand what i deal with, not the many people who failed near me, never got rich but i am still here. Reply With Quote
Jan 11, 2019 | 20:22 46
Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
All of the above, things change quarter to quarter and within that, nothing flat perfect or black here, white as snow fire burnt in the last century full of potholes, one dumb fat blonde told my why do i bitch, i have 6 to 8 percent om , , well i dont i can show a soil sample with 1 percent om and i dont think they use fractions, plus the climate wreck, its is so variable here i have two quarters half mile apart with a 10 bushel difference.
And where is that, roughly? Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 20:30 47 Land starts a good rifle shot south of the pioneer elevator in rycroft, pure gumbo then south and west to ashes and muskeg patches. There is a reason first farm has cows. Whole area should but times changed. People get fooled here because soil changes so quick, some of the best soil in alberta is next to me.
Last edited by makar; Jan 11, 2019 at 20:32.
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makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 20:31 48 Call me stupid no organic matter no dirt. Reply With Quote
makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 20:39 49 One quarter of mine dad said he used to walk across it to school and the ashes were half way up his rubber boots. I cant buy my crops i have to grow them and the suka curva mother nature dont always let me. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 20:45 50 Bigzee made a good point, as did Maker. Every area has some good and poor dirt. Even the Regina Plains gumbo can have some 1 inch deep water duck pastures...and once that stuff is saturated the only place for the water to go is up through evaporation.

Oddly enough I've said it before that there are people who wouldn't want to farm the Slum of the Ghetto, but it's home to me and all I know. I've seen alot worse and alot better. We ourselves have a mixed bag of tricks. But if I had to buy a new farm, if I could afford to be fussy...I would be! "Some" costs don't change much whether you're farming good dirt or poor dirt...but their abilities and limitations of each IS different.

117 years here...and if I could I would buy more beside me, if it was the right stuff...even if it cost a bit more for that luxury. But I am running out of time.

Edit: corrected to 117 years.
Last edited by farmaholic; Jan 11, 2019 at 21:35.
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makar's Avatar Jan 11, 2019 | 21:29 51 I would trade with you farma at least i could balance tires instead of digging clay with a screwdriver never mind trashing my track shovel. Reply With Quote
Jan 12, 2019 | 06:47 52
Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
Land starts a good rifle shot south of the pioneer elevator in rycroft, pure gumbo then south and west to ashes and muskeg patches. There is a reason first farm has cows. Whole area should but times changed. People get fooled here because soil changes so quick, some of the best soil in alberta is next to me.
What is the history of the ashes you are referring to? Repeated historical wildfires, or damages from land clearing, or something else? I am further west of you and we don’t have that. I understand there were several large wildfires through my area of the Peace before full settlement, started by early settlers and Indians and you can still see the black stumps in places, but nothing that has left permanent ash on the ground. Some areas the topsoil is only 5cm deep however. Reply With Quote
Jan 12, 2019 | 20:09 53
Quote Originally Posted by makar View Post
I would trade with you farma at least i could balance tires instead of digging clay with a screwdriver never mind trashing my track shovel.
You know, it never occurred to me that that wasn't a normal state of affairs. So, not everyone who drives on gravel roads, and off road has this problem? I don't balance any tires either, a 1/2 Oz weight is insignificant compared to the 4 lbs of clay perpetually stuck to the rims. I sure do enjoy stopping on the side of the road, in my good clothes, laying in the muck with a tire iron trying to get the unbalanced mud out so I can go faster than 30km/hour.

I gave some thought to the ashes comment, as I was burning brush piles today. The only thing that makes sense is that the land used to have deep peat moss, and it burnt completely, likely over the span of decades. A stack of poplar trees 15 feet high, and solid only leaves a couple of inches of ashes, so there is no way that standing timber could ever leave that much ashes. But the peat can burn/smoulder underground for years, with little oxygen, so it would leave lots of ashes in the process. Must have eventually burnt through to the surface, or a surface fire finished the job, and left the peat ashes exposed. Which would explain the low OM and shallow top soil you describe. Probably used to be the deepest richest soil in the area, then burnt all the OM, literally.

Whenever I've dug to the bottom of peat moss here(the deepest I have found is 11 feet), I find there is a layer of top soil at the very bottom, very similar to the top soil in other non-peat low ground, 6 to 8 inches deep, then clay below that, which I assume wouldn't burn? Reply With Quote