Maby Organic is the way to go

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Maby Organic is the way to go

Dec 6, 2018 | 18:46 1 We have been putting some serious thought into this, along with a few other neighbor, that maby saying piss on the current model and trying something different might be the way to go.

The organic industry seems to be chugging along just fine with no signs of slowing down.
With input cost rising with no signs of slowing down, conventional commodity prices not so great along with everything else that help make margins razor thin it seems silly to keep the status quo when their may be something better.
The numbers seem to work.

All the organic farmers I know seem happy, not that stressed and excited about the future. Reply With Quote
Austranada's Avatar Dec 6, 2018 | 20:38 2 There's Ego farming and Eco farming. I hope you choose the latter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS6TWtYWaPA Reply With Quote
ajl
Dec 7, 2018 | 10:32 3
Quote Originally Posted by RedLentil View Post
We have been putting some serious thought into this, along with a few other neighbor, that maby saying piss on the current model and trying something different might be the way to go.

The organic industry seems to be chugging along just fine with no signs of slowing down.
With input cost rising with no signs of slowing down, conventional commodity prices not so great along with everything else that help make margins razor thin it seems silly to keep the status quo when their may be something better.
The numbers seem to work.

All the organic farmers I know seem happy, not that stressed and excited about the future.
Actually as anybody smart enough to realize that the tooth fairy and Santa Claus are not real is aware, so called organic farming is not sustainable either. However, there is perhaps opportunity to pick some low hanging fruit, while conventional markets are buried under surplus. A buddy of mine in south Alberta where there is a hay market, will put a field in alfalfa, do the transition period to organic and then grow a few years of organic wheat and flax and once the weed pressure gets too great, get the sprayer out. While being an organic producer, you have to shut off your brain telling you this is BS, you are doing it for the money. Once you lose your mind that gets easier. I am old enough to remember the organic craze of the early 2000's where prices shot up, then came down while the buyer putting out contracts went broke. Same thing going to happen this time. Maybe you can guy Borgualt's $250000 super harrow for your organic acres. Reply With Quote
Austranada's Avatar Dec 7, 2018 | 19:14 4 Ajl

" I am old enough to remember the organic craze of the early 2000's where prices shot up, then came down while the buyer putting out contracts went broke. Same thing going to happen this time"


Wow excellent 20/20 hindsight, and you're psychic as well. Reply With Quote
Dec 9, 2018 | 17:42 5 The organic model and conventional are identical. Double the yield for half the price or half the yield for double the price.

I would say using more seasonal cover crops that fix N would be a better strategy. Reply With Quote
Dec 12, 2018 | 13:41 6 Growing cover crop seed might be the way to go or is it all protected under seed grower rights? Reply With Quote
Austranada's Avatar Dec 16, 2018 | 21:42 7
Quote Originally Posted by RedLentil View Post
We have been putting some serious thought into this, along with a few other neighbor, that maby saying piss on the current model and trying something different might be the way to go.

The organic industry seems to be chugging along just fine with no signs of slowing down.
With input cost rising with no signs of slowing down, conventional commodity prices not so great along with everything else that help make margins razor thin it seems silly to keep the status quo when their may be something better.
The numbers seem to work.

All the organic farmers I know seem happy, not that stressed and excited about the future.
I applaud your courage and hope you make the transition to enjoying the process of growing food. I've attached some web sites that you might find interesting.

http://ocp.com.au/product/herbicides/


https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/5852-multi-tasking-cover-crops-improve-the-no-till-bottom-line

https://www.sustainableformulations.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6y5SO8LKYnk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAaUCrF7fPs

https://www.andaman-ag.com/products/weed-slayer-organic-herbicide/ Reply With Quote
Austranada's Avatar Jan 13, 2019 | 06:30 8 Hey Red

I came across some interesting info in the attached link. Looks like you could possibly get a premium for non GMO crops which could help as you transition to organic if you do decide to go that way. Good luck.

http://non-gmoreport.com/articles/2019-non-gmo-and-organic-grain-production-contracts/ Reply With Quote
Feb 17, 2019 | 09:03 9 Organic would be sustainable if you could use P&K fertilizer.

AJI the guy you know that grows alfalfa for a few years then turns it organic for a few does he pile on the phos before planting alfalfa? Reply With Quote
Feb 17, 2019 | 09:04 10 Organic would be sustainable if you could use P&K fertilizer.

AJi the guy you know that grows alfalfa for a few years then turns it organic for a few does he pile on the phos before planting alfalfa? Reply With Quote