What is the difference between Canadian and American milk?

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What is the difference between Canadian and American milk?

Sep 11, 2018 | 09:55 1 Why would anyone in their right mind want to sell out Canada's dairy Industry and the family farms that produce probably the highest quality milk anywhere in the world. Canadian milk is free or hormones and antibiotics as this article from Alberta Milk confirms. Similarly Canadian poultry also has a higher standard. We can all remember the scandals of the US Poultry plants and the green pus running down the chicken.

What is the difference between Canadian and American milk?
Asked By David
There are a lot of ways to compare and contrast the differences in milk and industries! So this is not an exhaustive list by any means.

The most popular difference between the two countries is the use of recombinant bovine somatotropin, or rBST. What is that? Well, Health Canada states that rBST is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring growth hormone. It is approved for use in the USA to increase the production of milk in dairy cattle, but is illegal in Canada. Why is this illegal for use in Canada? Health Canada determined that it did not pose a health risk to humans, but they also determined that it had negative effects on the health and welfare of cows.

As well, our maximum Somatic Cell Count (SCC) is also lower than the American standard. What is a SCC? It’s the total number of cells per milliliter in milk. Primarily, SCC is composed of leukocytes, or white blood cells, that are produced by the cow’s immune system to fight an inflammation. It’s a way we measure milk quality. For example, a reduced count of SCC is associated with better quality milk. Often if the count is high, it means the cow might be sick. Our maximum allowable is 400,000. Our provincial average is well below this maximum at 205,000. In Canada, each load of milk is tested to ensure it’s below that standard. In the USA, the national standard is 750,000, but the export standard is 400,000.

Another difference is our marketing systems. Canadian milk is under a system called supply management. It means that our Canadian milk is produced by Canadian farmers. We don’t import or export a lot of dairy products. Our farms use quota to manage how much milk comes off their farms. The result is fresh milk that hasn’t been shipped long distances, supports our economy and our communities. We value our supply management system because it give a fair price to the farmer and the consumer and is not subsidized through tax dollars through the government. Notably, turkey, chicken and eggs also function under a supply managed system in Canada. Americans use a different system where they have a bigger reliance on exporting milk.

Canada’s farm sizes are also smaller than our American friends. Our average farm size is 85 cows, while the US is about 225. We also have a lot less farms that the USA. Canada has about 11,000 dairy farms while the USA has about 41,800!

We encourage you to contact dairy organizations in the USA for more information on their product and industry.
Last edited by Integrity_Farmer; Sep 11, 2018 at 09:58.
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Sep 11, 2018 | 12:55 2
Quote Originally Posted by Integrity_Farmer View Post
Why would anyone in their right mind want to sell out Canada's dairy Industry and the family farms that produce probably the highest quality milk anywhere in the world. Canadian milk is free or hormones and antibiotics as this article from Alberta Milk confirms. Similarly Canadian poultry also has a higher standard. We can all remember the scandals of the US Poultry plants and the green pus running down the chicken.

What is the difference between Canadian and American milk?
Asked By David
There are a lot of ways to compare and contrast the differences in milk and industries! So this is not an exhaustive list by any means.

The most popular difference between the two countries is the use of recombinant bovine somatotropin, or rBST. What is that? Well, Health Canada states that rBST is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring growth hormone. It is approved for use in the USA to increase the production of milk in dairy cattle, but is illegal in Canada. Why is this illegal for use in Canada? Health Canada determined that it did not pose a health risk to humans, but they also determined that it had negative effects on the health and welfare of cows.

As well, our maximum Somatic Cell Count (SCC) is also lower than the American standard. What is a SCC? It’s the total number of cells per milliliter in milk. Primarily, SCC is composed of leukocytes, or white blood cells, that are produced by the cow’s immune system to fight an inflammation. It’s a way we measure milk quality. For example, a reduced count of SCC is associated with better quality milk. Often if the count is high, it means the cow might be sick. Our maximum allowable is 400,000. Our provincial average is well below this maximum at 205,000. In Canada, each load of milk is tested to ensure it’s below that standard. In the USA, the national standard is 750,000, but the export standard is 400,000.

Another difference is our marketing systems. Canadian milk is under a system called supply management. It means that our Canadian milk is produced by Canadian farmers. We don’t import or export a lot of dairy products. Our farms use quota to manage how much milk comes off their farms. The result is fresh milk that hasn’t been shipped long distances, supports our economy and our communities. We value our supply management system because it give a fair price to the farmer and the consumer and is not subsidized through tax dollars through the government. Notably, turkey, chicken and eggs also function under a supply managed system in Canada. Americans use a different system where they have a bigger reliance on exporting milk.

Canada’s farm sizes are also smaller than our American friends. Our average farm size is 85 cows, while the US is about 225. We also have a lot less farms that the USA. Canada has about 11,000 dairy farms while the USA has about 41,800!

We encourage you to contact dairy organizations in the USA for more information on their product and industry.
I read that Canada has a strong and aggressive dairy lobby, any truth to that.
I cut all dairy out of my diet 5 years ago. Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Sep 11, 2018 | 12:55 3 We can keep all those rules and standards without SM.

We buy NO milk or cereal, cheese is fermented so it is great for you. Reply With Quote
ajl
Sep 11, 2018 | 13:18 4 How many Canadian travel to the US and purchase and consume US dairy product each year? Apparently US dairy is just fine thank you. Have done this myself. As for higher quality, well that is debatable. There are better and poorer producers in the US as is the case in Canada. Used to be the standard for somatic cell count was 1.5 million in Canada back in the 80's and it wasn't an issue then but producers on both sides of the border are well below that today as your data shows. This arguement for preserving SM is weak like all the others. Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 13:32 5 You're asking the wrong crowd. Ask the single mother with 3 kids working two jobs if she can afford to pay for quality. I'll let her speak for herself. Reply With Quote
blackpowder's Avatar Sep 11, 2018 | 14:16 6 I would leave this to actual milk producers, but if IF has an observation so do I.
Is milk a luxury item or necessity?
While visiting a modern dairy processing facility in China, I was impressed with the urgency and pride involved in providing easy access for everyone, to a vital staple.
Here for the most part, we can choose other options, not necessarily healthier.
If it were all about food safety, we would irradiate all our food and E Coli for example, would be eradicated.
But food is often political. And so with milk. BST is probably a political standard. Somatic cell count a safety and herd health standard.
SM is about protecting an industry as we know it. Right or wrong, I can't say.
Only the poor need milk the most.
Do I want all our milk to come from Arizona? Not necessarily. Do I wish to perpetuate a 60 cow dairy in Quebec? Well then I want to know the price to me and how to allow it's attractiveness to the poor. Set whatever standards you like at that time. Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 14:53 7
Quote Originally Posted by macdon02 View Post
You're asking the wrong crowd. Ask the single mother with 3 kids working two jobs if she can afford to pay for quality. I'll let her speak for herself.
So good you are concerned with poverty and the ability of the poor to buy food. Are you a socialist? When dairy prices are cheaper in Canada than the US then how does this help? In addition, the US dairy producers income is from government subsidies.
So what would happen should the Canadian government agree to the Trump demands? Well Canadian Dairy production would be shut down in Canada and milk will be imported from the US.
People on this site need to deal in facts and not hyperbole.

Dairy products cheaper in Canada than US
https://www.dairynetwork.com/doc/canadian-dairy-products-17-cheaper-study-says-0001

In 2015 dairy producers income was government subsidies

https://www.realagriculture.com/2018/02/u-s-dairy-subsidies-equal-73-percent-of-producer-returns-says-new-report/ Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 15:00 8
Quote Originally Posted by fjlip View Post
We can keep all those rules and standards without SM.

We buy NO milk or cereal, cheese is fermented so it is great for you.
No those regulations will be reduced to a lower standard. Trump has gutted most environmental health and safety regulations in the US. Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 15:53 9 Just did an online look at Walmart 2% milk prices in Canada and the US.

Walmart Canada $4.74 CAD for 4 Litres = $1.18 per litre
Walmart USA $3.76 USD for 3.78 Litres (1 US gal.) FX at 1.32 = $4.96 CAD or $1.31 per litre

One store on one day but it clearly shows retail fluid milk is cheaper in Canada than the US! And I am not sure what it costs to buy USD today 1.32 is probably low.
Last edited by chuckChuck; Sep 11, 2018 at 15:55.
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ajl
Sep 11, 2018 | 16:40 10
Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
Just did an online look at Walmart 2% milk prices in Canada and the US.

Walmart Canada $4.74 CAD for 4 Litres = $1.18 per litre
Walmart USA $3.76 USD for 3.78 Litres (1 US gal.) FX at 1.32 = $4.96 CAD or $1.31 per litre

One store on one day but it clearly shows retail fluid milk is cheaper in Canada than the US! And I am not sure what it costs to buy USD today 1.32 is probably low.
In many midwestern US states like Michigan, you can get fluid milk for 1.79 US a gallon. Even under a dollar is some locations. When I looked for it an Albertson in Great Falls a while back it was 3.39US per gallon. The dollar was near par back then. Some dairy prices are similar to ours but others are much cheaper. The people doing the shopping for the study did not shop very hard as the study had a forgone conclusion. Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 17:46 11 The USDA publishes a report on retail milk prices from numerous cities. Prices are quite variable.

https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/RetailMilkPrices2018.pdf

The simple average for January to August 2018 is $3.19 per US gallon which is $4.21 CAD for 3.78 Litres which is $1.11 CAD per litre. Walmart Canada's on line price is a $1.18 per litre. A whopping 7 Cents cheaper in the US!

One Canadian store on one day vs numerous locations and stores US wide over 8 months does not tell the whole story.

But I don't expect getting rid of supply management will lower Canadian prices because our retail market is different, our population is smaller, US farmers and processors are often on a larger scale than Canadian versions which gives them economies of scale.

Our goal is to supply our own market with quality product and make sure farmers make a decent living in an industry that cannot afford large swings in farm gate prices or market share. When you milk cows you cant just decide to fill the barn with something else in the spring. This is a perishable product that needs a stable market.

The US has a problem with oversupply and low prices in some states. We do not have to solve their over supply problem with additional Canadian market access. We are not their problem. Especially when they have their own subsidy and support programs which are paid for with tax payers money.

Trump is just playing politics with the mid term elections coming up. Wisconsin supported Trump.
He knows bugger all about the dairy industry. But he could know a lot about lame ducks after the mid terms. Lets hope so! Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 17:56 12
Quote Originally Posted by ajl View Post
In many midwestern US states like Michigan, you can get fluid milk for 1.79 US a gallon. Even under a dollar is some locations. When I looked for it an Albertson in Great Falls a while back it was 3.39US per gallon. The dollar was near par back then. Some dairy prices are similar to ours but others are much cheaper. The people doing the shopping for the study did not shop very hard as the study had a forgone conclusion.
The current average price in Detroit Michigan is actually $2.48 USD for 3.78 L. It is $3.79 in Milwaukee!

Why is it more expensive in Wisconsin the big dairy state? That is $1.32 per Litre CAD! Which is substantially higher than Walmart Canada for a $1.18 CAD.

There are a lot of poor people in Detroit. In retail charge what the market will bare?? Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 17:57 13 My concern with rBST has always been the animal's welfare. I know someone that used to milk cows treated with it. Statistics show it increases clinical mastitis cases by 25%, clinical lameness by 55% and raises the risk of not conceiving by 40%. It's a death sentence for cows. Absolutely no need to be using it - sort out the marketing and processing side so the farmer gets paid a sustainable price and quit mistreating cows. Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 18:03 14 This is old news but relevant to the topic:
Health Canada fires 3 scientists

CBC News · Posted: Jul 15, 2004 8:59 AM ET | Last Updated: July 15, 2004

Health Canada has fired three scientists who criticized the department's drug approval policies.

Shiv Chopra, Margaret Haydon and Gerard Lambert received letters of termination on Wednesday, said Steve Hindle, president of the Professional Institute of the Public Service.

FROM OCT. 7, 2002: Restrict antibiotic use in animals: scientists

FROM NOV. 19, 1999: Gov't scientist suspended over dairy hormone debacle?

Health Canada spokesperson Ryan Baker denied the three were fired because of anything they said publicly. He says the reasons are confidential and are included in the letters of termination.

In the letter Lambert received Wednesday, he says the department is firing him for failing to follow orders and showing a lack of progress in his work. He's been there for 31 years.

Lambert says the department had always liked his work before he spoke out publicly about his concerns over bovine growth hormone.

The three scientists have been involved in a series of high-profile clashes with Health Canada.

They criticized Monsanto's bovine growth hormone, which led to a Senate inquiry and a decision not to approve the drug. They also questioned carbadox, a drug used in pigs, and Baytril, which was used to promote growth in cows and chickens.


Haydon called a 2001 Canadian ban on Brazilian beef a political decision, and Chopra criticized former health minister Allan Rock for stockpiling antibiotics during the post-Sept. 11 anthrax scare.

Prior to the May 2003 discovery of mad cow in Canada, both Hayton and Chopra also warned measures to prevent the disease were inadequate. They had called for a ban on the use of animal parts in feed.

The association representing the scientists plans to mount a legal challenge to have the scientists rehired.

CBC's Journalistic Standards and Practices Reply With Quote
Sep 11, 2018 | 18:07 15

Superstore Regina



Albertsons, Glasgow, Mt Reply With Quote