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Klause's Avatar Apr 14, 2018 | 08:57 1 If you could have a machine that works by itself without an operator what would you want to automate on your farm?


Let's have a non political/enviro conversation... That doesn't stress anybody out (I hope) Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 09:33 2 Sprayer Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 09:34 3 Money printing press. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 09:41 4
Quote Originally Posted by Klause View Post
If you could have a machine that works by itself without an operator what would you want to automate on your farm?


Let's have a non political/enviro conversation... That doesn't stress anybody out (I hope)
Hauling bales. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 09:43 5
Quote Originally Posted by Klause View Post
If you could have a machine that works by itself without an operator what would you want to automate on your farm?


Let's have a non political/enviro conversation... That doesn't stress anybody out (I hope)
Great idea for a topic.

Not so much a machine, but a system.

I want every cow to be equipped with GPS, communications, the ability to monitor vital signs in real time, plus a shock collar integrated into the system.

Then I want to remove all fences, and rely on the shock collar and training to rotationally graze cows, move them, bring them to corrals for processing etc. Send me a message when they have a temperature, under stress, calving.

Then never have to go out to find a dead cow who laid down in a hole, got on her back and couldn't get up, no more paranoia about when they will break out and go marauding through the crops. no more checking calving cows constantly in cold weather just in case, move cows or chase them with one person and a computer.

This would be to the cattle industry, what GMO and No till was to the grain industry.

Being a herd animal, all you would have to do is train a few and they would train the rest.

What I envision is progressively larger shocks when going the wrong way, and perhaps a reward (hormonal?) for going the right way.

I would happily get back into cows in a big way if this was possible. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 10:07 6 Like you mentioned before Klause, rockpicker and the roller. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 10:34 7 I always enjoyed running equipment. I think the most $ could be made in having a fully automated grain handling system like high throughput elevators. Being able to direct grain to cleaners/driers and blend to very bottom of grade when shipping or blend up to exact specs that the end user or buyer wants. All at the push of a button and very little shovel or broom work. Reply With Quote
GDR
Apr 14, 2018 | 10:57 8 Shoveling shit, don't mind cleaning corrals but using a pitch fork cleaning shit is my least favourite job. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 11:32 9 Why not a more simplistic approach to bringing automation into our farms

A system that cover a range of important low broadband data points.

Bin temp/moisture fan control
Soil moisture and nutrient profiles.
Fuel tank level monitoring security
Home monitoring, temp or door alarms.
Water bowl monitor
rodent control

Right now it cost an absolute fortune to monitor all these things through individual cellular modules.. but we do it.

We haul little envelopes of information with cellular frequencies, virtual freight trains build for huge bandwidth.

All this happens yet there are technologies equivalent in efficiency to email for sending that same data to an cellular end piont (the freight train)

The systems we have are primitive. Why not improve them 10x first. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 11:36 10 Ideally “app like functionality” intuitive, user friendly, easy, looks nice, available on all operating devices.

- rock picking, with a simple app like rock marking system all people same day in different fields can mark rocks so it’s easier for the rock picker to locate them. Once they are picked, machine or half ton they can just as easily be deleted. The app will keep background layers for the future so every one and every thing can look in the areas where rocks usually “show up”

- land rolling, harrowing, spraying, fert spreading, etc. manually do headlands and obstacles( poles, rock piles, sloughs, etc) the machine will fill or paint the rest.

- grain cart

- disking sloughs

- I like the cattle monitoring thing, maybe easier for farmers to have someone’s else’s livestock on our land ( income) for self feeding , and cowboy takes them home for the winter. Better land utilization, free range, income etc. Free range chickens, sheep would be nice around the farm, also for the dogs.

- all in one app. To monitor every thing. Farm security, grain bins (level, and temp), vehicles (location, speed, stop signs-stopping), equipment, application rates and error messages in equipment used by hired labour ( seeding, fertilizer, spraying etc)


The technology is all there now, so it’s the software, integration, debugging, redundancy, training, service, and most importantly cost. Will it be a 2 year pay back or 20? It better be closer to 2 years or Farmers will not adapt the technologies.

Farmers are not technology technologists. Sensors fail, wiring shorts, sun spots, cell towers, power outages, etc etc the systems better have built in testing and diagnostics to point to the faults and recommended repairs or what the failure is ( no codes thank you), or a central call Center that monitors everything where a person technician will call you ( like a security system call Center)
- machine down, emergency service only happens on fridays long weekends, when time is of the essence, and they are swamped with all the calls because every one is busy. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 12:42 11 I would like to have automatic seeders, sprayers and combines. I think the way to build them is have the implement and a common genset to run them. Move more towards electric controls and power instead of hydraulic. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 13:27 12 Interesting thoughts. I am so 1940. I am a young guy who just doesn’t find it appealing personally. I am a misfit in today’s world. I enjoy little more than walking about the sheep, looking for issues, inspecting the bees, toddling around picking rocks. I worry about my ignorance sometimes. Ok a lot of the time I do...

Born a generation, maybe two, too late. Overwhelmed with how far behind I am technologically. Reply With Quote
Partners's Avatar Apr 14, 2018 | 13:59 13 Even with current tech..life not that hard.nice cabs on most machinery.gps..bins monitored..hopper bins..if getting older hire the sprayer..grain hauled..
The younger generation will even have it easier..all at a cost though.. Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Apr 14, 2018 | 14:10 14 "Farmers are not technology technologists. Sensors fail, wiring shorts, sun spots, cell towers, power outages, etc etc the systems better have built in testing and diagnostics to point to the faults and recommended repairs or what the failure is ( no codes thank you), or a central call Center that monitors everything where a person technician will call you ( like a security system call Center)
- machine down, emergency service only happens on Fridays long weekends, when time is of the essence, and they are swamped with all the calls because every one is busy."

That is absolutely necessary! Currently have a dead tandem nobody can fix...electrical! Son is auto tech, constantly upgrading. Everything is getting more complicated, scary shit he says. Just open your Duramax hood, can't hardly see the engine for sensor harnesses, pipes, wires! Just close it and call service!
Ford/GM 8 speed transmission they designed in common, has a chain drive oil pump...great idea... will see. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 17:49 15 You know Klause it's noble to want to try to design something to help fellow farmers but you have to ask why all this technology was created in the first place. I love autosteer. I love section control. I love all that shit. Makes my life heaven compared to those fucking long days up and down the field in the old 4450 working summerfallow years ago. My current truck has an autoshift tranny now. It's a Meritor 12-speed very similar to the Volvo I-Shift. Heaven. It's 2018, fuck off with stirring my own gears. That transmission wasn't designed to make my life easier even though it did. It was designed and implemented in trucks now so that any steering wheel holder could take 100k pounds from point A to B. Kinda like the Humboldt accident truck. We can. Should we? Maybe keep some skill required in farming. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 17:54 16 Give me a 3D printer that'll punch out robots, drones or some other tiny mechanized creatures using chips from China, that'll run around each field picking weeds and applying fungicide to affected plants or swats bugs as needed. Solar powered army that just doesn't stop
Last edited by macdon02; Apr 14, 2018 at 17:57.
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Apr 14, 2018 | 18:44 17 Good point Mac

What would we need to grow a crop organic?
- biologicals and other nutrient sources
- I like the drone/robot weeders

- I like even more the revenues, less expenditures (risk) and the growing market Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Apr 14, 2018 | 19:34 18 I like the money printing press.

Oh, that would be so great because with farming you just piss money away all day.

3D printer could be cool to have.

Ah shit, it would probably be quicker than our contractors in Florida. FML. Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 19:51 19 In theory you'd reduce pesticide use on crop itself by probably 80ish% depending how accurate the robot can get. You would be applying only to the weeds. Fuck these TUA's and gmo bullshit. Not sure it would ever be totally organic but if there's some mechanical removal running for 6 weeks we don't need the latest and greatest $30 shot of snake oil. Likely be more effective in the long run.... "I have a dream" Reply With Quote
Apr 14, 2018 | 23:36 20 great topic , love the responses , nice to hire younger people to teach
me how to think in the new world of tech. take a picture of it . and they google the manual
before I am done looking for it in the shop . (feel like an idiot )
hard to teach old dog , but I am trying.

like I tell my kids when they ask for advice , do not ask me , I know everything you need to know to about surviving in the last century how much good it will do you ? you figure out

sadly in their mid 30s , they are almost too old, so you end up mining your grandson for info
but there are actually things of value in there too .
Last edited by sawfly1; Apr 15, 2018 at 00:16.
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Apr 15, 2018 | 00:04 21 I would like a diagnostic code reader that would quickly identify computer problems especially ones associated with ag diesels and hydraulics. If we could easily find and fix computer glitches that are causing so much aggravation, it would make our lives so much more enjoyable and reduce stress at seeding and harvest. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Apr 15, 2018 | 00:12 22 There has already been great technical strides in the last century. My Dad has seen alot of changes and I wonder what farming will look like by the time I'm his age?

It seems the changes are more advanced each time and more frequent, probably a parabolic line if charted since the Wild West was tamed.

I've had a tough time adjusting in the beginning but am better at adapting to and adopting some of the new technology.

My question would be, just how much of it is truly necessary?

Some literally makes my life easier, while some I haven't adopted I just consider hair splitting.

You've all heard me claim our efficiency gains just get stolen anyway. Reply With Quote
Apr 15, 2018 | 18:02 23 Keep in mind that the easier we make things down on the farm, the less barriers to entry there are. Not many people want to milk cows by hand, fork into a threshing machine, hand weed, or drive an open tractor in the dust/rain/blizzard. But a lot of people would be quite willing to push some buttons on a computer to do theses same jobs with no knowledge or hardship required Reply With Quote
Apr 15, 2018 | 19:04 24 Good reason to own land. Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2018 | 17:03 25 Klause

What Are your thoughts on technology adoption?

Where would you like to see the next advancements in our industry?

Bourgault is probably working on a 150 foot drill with a 1500 bushel tank. The “it’s never enough” attitude has served them well but it’s nothing I’m looking for.

Some automated self driving implements on the other hand.. Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2018 | 17:14 26 An android like off of Startrek that can do it all. If the automated machinery needs constant baby sitting then whats the point?

Yes, excessive automation at Tesla was a mistake. To be precise, my mistake. Humans are underrated.

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk)*April 13, 2018 Reply With Quote
Apr 16, 2018 | 18:27 27 But what if it works really good some day?

One way of looking at early adoption is that your helping foster something that will eventually be adopted by the masses and bring about a possative change in the industry. Only 13% are considered early adopters. Lentil I gather is not categorized as one, but I bet he doesn’t regret investing in auto steer?

If someone somewhere didn’t step up to the plate and say “I’m willing to adopt this new technology because i think it’s a great idea and it will be good for my farm”.

Would biglentil still be out there eyeballing the line or looking for his spray foam marks out in the field this spring if nobody adopted early?

Also Comparing Musks mistake of rolling out full scale automation for the model 3 prior to the factory being ready for full scale implementation isnt really a fair argument for dismissing the potential of automation in agriculture. It does point out the importance of product testing.

I would think manufacturers will become more conscious of the importance of product testing to protect their reputation.

We all know that the EPA threw a big wrench into the reliability of farm machinery. Trying to keep up with those mandates over that span of time was too much for the manufacturing industry to handle and it shows today in the problems that still exist in emmisions systems.

I have 16 deisel engines on my farm and I’m only concerned with the reliability of the newer ones.
Last edited by workboots; Apr 16, 2018 at 19:37.
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