Stock Market: Correction or Crash?

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Stock Market: Correction or Crash?

Feb 9, 2018 | 12:42 61 I am going to play devils advocate Errol. If we didn't believe the last unemployment and job numbers how do we believe these ones, although these ones seem more realistic to me. Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 12:52 62 The chickens may have come home to roost in the U.S. Tax cuts and more spending may have pushed them over the edge. You cannot keep borrowing forever. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Feb 9, 2018 | 13:00 63 Those who have people in trades or working through school working part time see the reality.

The USA isn’t crashing Ag star it’s movinv forward.

Stocks were set for a tipping point and they got theirs

People working companies moving home and jobs make the USA a great place

Canada you can match and say your gay bi trans or whatever but don’t say your normal male or female and be happy unemployed in a soup lineup

Thank a Trudeau Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 13:08 64 The announcement yesterday from our energy and environment ministers have made Suncor announce no new projects will be done in Canada.

There will now be a “gender analysis” now involved with the pipeline approval process. 🙈 Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 13:14 65 The U.S. used to be a great place, but Trump is ruining it. Clear lack of competent leadership. It will be the end of it with a bankruptcy specialist in charge. Trump said a country could just default on its debt. Well we will see how that works. Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 13:22 66 U.S. has a 100 trillion in unfunded liability. Basically the country is insolvent. Congress and the Dunce don't get it. Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 13:22 67
Quote Originally Posted by agstar77 View Post
The U.S. used to be a great place, but Trump is ruining it. Clear lack of competent leadership. It will be the end of it with a bankruptcy specialist in charge. Trump said a country could just default on its debt. Well we will see how that works.
If you care to study history, EVERY country eventually defaults on it's debt. Some more often and more regularly than others. It is not mathematically possible to pay all the debt. If he is willing to admit that default is the only realistic way out of the debt, then that is doing much more than any previous administration has done to acknowledging a solution. Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 13:25 68
Quote Originally Posted by Misterjade9 View Post
I am going to play devils advocate Errol. If we didn't believe the last unemployment and job numbers how do we believe these ones, although these ones seem more realistic to me.
Misterjade, good point . . . . believe biggest job losses are in the part-time service sector. Rising minimum wages may be forcing employers to work with less staff. Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 13:35 69
Quote Originally Posted by agstar77 View Post
The U.S. used to be a great place, but Trump is ruining it. Clear lack of competent leadership. It will be the end of it with a bankruptcy specialist in charge. Trump said a country could just default on its debt. Well we will see how that works.
Unlike saying the budget will balance itself??? Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 17:35 70 Similar except the Moron has his little finger on a big button. Reply With Quote
Feb 9, 2018 | 19:34 71 "Unlike saying the budget will balance itself??? "


Rand Paul spoke for nearly 13 hours in the Senate against the recently approved budget by the GOP.

So CaseIH, what ever happened to those so called fiscally responsible Republicans who bashed Obama for eight for running deficits and now themselves will run a one Trillion $ deficit?

Was your above quote directed southward, as it sure seems to apply? Reply With Quote
Feb 11, 2018 | 09:23 72 An opinion, but all artificially supported central bank asset bubbles are now at-risk, not just stock market values. This includes real estate globally. Central bankers are trying to deflect last week’s crash as no big deal, business as usual. Rate hikes ahead as planned.

Not a chance (IMO) . . . Last week’s was the straw that broke the central banker’s back. Their manipulative power is now greatly diminished and markets must now fend-for-themselves . . . . Reply With Quote
Feb 11, 2018 | 09:58 73 The central banks create the boom with loose fiscal policy and then withdraw the stimulus every 8 to 10 years to create a bust. Through the derivatives markets and with an unlimited bankroll market they also have the ability to set commodity prices. They do this to keep a lid on inflation. Its an artificial economy built on artificial money since the 70's. Therefore its very difficult to predict where the market is going it all depends on how the central banks throttle it. One thing appears certain as time moves on so does inflation (except in grain prices lol). They work damn hard keeping everyone worried about deflation to keep money velocity under control. Right when the market was building inflationary expectations they nipped it in the bud.
Last edited by biglentil; Feb 11, 2018 at 10:01.
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helmsdale's Avatar Feb 11, 2018 | 21:40 74 Nikkei off -2.3% or so, but djia futures up 1.5%. If I was actually playing this market right now it be sick. My paltry rrsp has been sitting in cash for 4 years now... it can stay there a while longer. Reply With Quote
Feb 16, 2018 | 08:15 75 Strong rebound in U.S. equities . . . about 50% recovery off last weeks wipeout. Technically, bounces may recover as much as 66% off recent lows, before selling erupts again. VIX will awaken again (IMO). Reply With Quote
Feb 16, 2018 | 08:46 76 Anyone looked at a TSX chart? Lol why would anyone invest in Canada? We have basically flat lined since '14. You have to be extremely selective and lucky to win in this country. I guess if you invested USD into Canada you'd win on the exchange but no reason to buy equities otherwise. Reply With Quote
Feb 16, 2018 | 18:35 77 Can’t remember where I saw it but there are Wall Street companies being sued for intentional “VIX Fixing”

. Basically they place buy or sell future options bids/offers with no intention of ever having them filled, something about no margins, pulling of bids I can’t remember exactly how it went. Serious enough to the exchange Police😬 are involved Reply With Quote
Feb 16, 2018 | 19:06 78
Quote Originally Posted by agstar77 View Post
U.S. has a 100 trillion in unfunded liability. Basically the country is insolvent. Congress and the Dunce don't get it.
Wasnt this Govt debt,a problem for usa maybe 8 or so years ago and has ballooned out.

Speaking of which New Zealand a economic powerhouse apparently had strong conservative govt for not sure how long maybe 12 years but traded with surplus may quite a few cuts to get it back in shape.

A socialist leaning govt been in for maybe 6 to 8 months are talking deficeit in there budgets already with some of there spending programmes must be hard to balance correct Reply With Quote
Feb 16, 2018 | 19:08 79 Whistleblower Alleges Manipulation Of Cboe Volatility Index: Wall Street's most widely followed gauge of future stock market volatility is being manipulated, a law firm representing an "anonymous whistleblower" alleged in a letter to U.S. regulators and seen by Reuters. The accusations prompted Cboe Global Markets, the financial exchange operator that is home to the Cboe Volatility Index <.VIX>, to ask Wall Street's self-funded regulator, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), to look into the matter, two sources familiar with the situation said. In addition to the letter, the law firm said it had filed a formal complaint with regulators on behalf of the unidentified client. The complaint says regulators should look at trading data for proof of alleged manipulation. The letter, dated Monday, alleged that trading firms had taken advantage of the way the VIX is calculated in order to manipulate the index, costing investors nearly $2 billion a year. The whistleblower's letter alleges a flaw in the calculation of the VIX that allows trading firms to manipulate the VIX index by posting quotes for S&P 500 options, without actually trading. So far, regulatory agencies have not commented. (Source: Reuters) Reply With Quote
Mar 1, 2018 | 22:36 80 Now stir in a global retaliation to Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs. Things could get pretty messy, pretty quick. What comes around, goes around when it comes to trade protectionism (IMO).

Strap-in . . . Big equity/ commodity volatility possible ahead. Reply With Quote
Mar 1, 2018 | 23:08 81 I'm running out of straps!

Agree, more volatility. Would not be surprised to see overall lower DOW with 23700 possible within 3 wks Reply With Quote
Mar 1, 2018 | 23:21 82 U.S. taking a huge risk with a 25 percent steel tariff. Global economy is far bigger than the U.S. economy. Global retaliation may be swift . . . . Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Mar 1, 2018 | 23:32 83 Did Errol say, "strap in or strap on"?
Either way it might be a wild ride?

Another display of my warped sense of humour. I looked for a video clip of Family Guy where that quote came from but couldn't find one of just it. Download a program and learn to edit my own. Reply With Quote
Mar 1, 2018 | 23:51 84 Inflation is gonna show when least expected and wanted. I like this. Sorry steel your taking one for the team. We already have the pulse fiasco. Anything that'll drive down USD short term I'm ok with, let's see 78 on DX. It'll pretty much write in stone that Justin is done. Wrong place wrong time. Reply With Quote
Mar 2, 2018 | 01:08 85 Commodities are in the shitter already, not even boat loads of freshly printed monopoly money can prop em up.

Oh and anyone that has any ole $1000 bills under your mattress take em to the bank. The Canadian Central bank has decided its not legal tender anymore. $100 dollar bills slated for the chopping block next and the nickel. Save your pre 1981 nickels they are the last form of real money that exists, .999 nickel. Won't even be able to use the term "cash is king" anymore because soon it wont exist. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Mar 2, 2018 | 06:48 86 Rumour has it those cash bills have more value as collector items than currency! Reply With Quote
Mar 6, 2018 | 18:26 87 More market turbulence straight ahead . . . now Trump’s top economic advisor has resigned Gary Cohn. Reply With Quote
Mar 6, 2018 | 18:51 88
Quote Originally Posted by errolanderson View Post
More market turbulence straight ahead . . . now Trump’s top economic advisor has resigned Gary Cohn.
Must be too much winning LOL Reply With Quote
Mar 6, 2018 | 20:04 89 Once the Titanic hit the iceberg there wasn't a single captain on earth that could prevent her sinking. The band continued to play to the bitter end. No different than the current world economic situation. The iceberg was struck in 1971 with the abolishment of the gold standard.

Oil futures in Chinese Yuan backed by physical gold comes online this month. Also Iran just banned the use of USD for trade of oil and other goods. Ghadaffi and Sadam where taken out for trying to do the same thing. Is the US going to take out the leader of Iran and China?
Last edited by biglentil; Mar 6, 2018 at 20:34.
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Mar 7, 2018 | 04:17 90 White House has turned decidedly protectionist with Cohn resigning. This could ignite a full-on global trade war . . . and not good for any markets (including commodities).

USDA must fuel the bull on Thursday to maintain grain price strength or markets vulnerable (IMO). Reply With Quote