SK Pulse annual report - any suggestions going forward?

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SK Pulse annual report - any suggestions going forward?

buzz's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 10:58 1 We were at home relaxing this morning and catching up on some reading.

With the uncertainty around the pulse industry, this is when we need leadership from organizations like SK Pulse. I was wondering if they should be trying something different. Here is the annual report and what they accomplished this past year.



http://saskpulse.com/files/annual/re..._Report_LR.pdf Reply With Quote
Jan 1, 2018 | 11:23 2 It needs to do a lot different on their take from farmers regarding soybeans. Fat chance! It will be a honey hole for non refundable check offs. Why do we need them dipping into this particular crop? Reply With Quote
buzz's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 11:26 3 I don't disagree. I like having another crop option but soybeans are commodity price driven and I am not sure we can compete with the cost of production of south america.

I am worried about market access in India. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 12:40 4 We can’t compete with South America in the unreal expensive Canadian system. New seed laws down their alow farmer saved seed after one year paying fee. Cheaper equipment etc.

We’re done! Reply With Quote
Klause's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 12:51 5 Oh no they'll charge checkoffs so they can go to Argentina and Brazil and tell "representatives" there just how much smarter and better producers with better practices we are.


After all Saskatchewan soybeans yield 40-50 bpa according to wise guys in coffee shops and online.
...

Works till a guy who knows what 40-70 bpa beans actually look like sees the fields. LOL.


That's 65 bpa beans in the southern hemisphere.
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Jan 1, 2018 | 12:54 6 I question why I can't compete.

Soybeans at the R1 level are nothing but money.

Farm saved 1.25 bushels, late may burn off application, 2 glypho season apps, liquid and peat first year, skip the peat second year, a bit of phosphate, 1 mid August rain, $50.00 to $60.00 all in costs to harvest.

Love the beast. If it fails, repeat next year on same land. Reply With Quote
Klause's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 13:10 7
Quote Originally Posted by checking View Post
I question why I can't compete.

Soybeans at the R1 level are nothing but money.

Farm saved 1.25 bushels, late may burn off application, 2 glypho season apps, liquid and peat first year, skip the peat second year, a bit of phosphate, 1 mid August rain, $50.00 to $60.00 all in costs to harvest.

Love the beast. If it fails, repeat next year on same land.
Except... Western beans are low in protein... Undesirable for human consumption and export markets. Small detail nobody talks about from spga.


Why can't you compete?


My uncle grows 2500 acres of beans a year. Averages 65 long term yield. Grows bin run seed. One pass pursuit one pass gly no innoculant. Seeds with a $45,000 no till drill behind a 250hp fwa tractor. Harvests beans replants to wheat next day.


Gets a buck a bushel more than we do for the beans and has gained 7% through inflation from the time he seeded to when he harvested.

$660 USD from beans then another $500 from wheat in 1 year. Total expenses about $400 for the year.


And don't forget R1 beans will get delisted before too long here... Just like they do with the old conventional canola.

Just sayin' if you see how other countries farm it makes you feel really depressed farming here. Lol. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 13:30 8 Checking you can tell your self you can compete with snow beans snow wheat snow canola good on you tralitubis South America is destroying our high cost system. Learn travel view. Reply With Quote
Jan 1, 2018 | 14:10 9 Typically low protein, low oil is the result of a cooler than normal later growing season. You've done the tests klause, please share the results.

Are you certain the same fate can't happen in SA, and no one gets rejected, or penalized in the human consumption market?

Point taken on shelving R1, but until they do, then no one needs a 40 bushel crop just to buy a R2.

Sf3, big yields, big views don't impress me much, sorry. Reply With Quote
Jan 1, 2018 | 14:46 10
Quote Originally Posted by checking View Post
I question why I can't compete.

Soybeans at the R1 level are nothing but money.

Farm saved 1.25 bushels, late may burn off application, 2 glypho season apps, liquid and peat first year, skip the peat second year, a bit of phosphate, 1 mid August rain, $50.00 to $60.00 all in costs to harvest.

Love the beast. If it fails, repeat next year on same land.
Valid points.

The only thing that matters is net profit. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 16:39 11 Two crops no winter and no bullshit like canada.

Yea we can compete Reply With Quote
Klause's Avatar Jan 1, 2018 | 18:42 12
Quote Originally Posted by checking View Post
Typically low protein, low oil is the result of a cooler than normal later growing season. You've done the tests klause, please share the results.

Are you certain the same fate can't happen in SA, and no one gets rejected, or penalized in the human consumption market?

Point taken on shelving R1, but until they do, then no one needs a 40 bushel crop just to buy a R2.

Sf3, big yields, big views don't impress me much, sorry.


I grew beans in Manitoba. I grew them in sask. My family grows them in Argentina.


No. Low protein doesn't happen there or in the USA for the most part (nd sometimes) it's pretty simple 180 day growing season. Lots of heat. And 39 inches of annual rainfall.


Next year our grain cos will be bringing in discounts for protein on beans... And they will get bigger once they get guys hooked on them.

There's a 4% protein spread between MB and here and that much again between MB and standard beans.


https://www.producer.com/2017/02/low...-lowers-price/ Reply With Quote
Jan 1, 2018 | 23:14 13 Question for klause,not trying to be nasty but if farming is that good in Argentina and so poor in sack why do you farm here. You like snow 6 mo of the yr???Mabey you are in political trouble there ??? Just curious if I had an inroad there and was young as you I think I may be there. NO offence meant. Reply With Quote
Klause's Avatar Jan 2, 2018 | 14:12 14
Quote Originally Posted by Horse View Post
Question for klause,not trying to be nasty but if farming is that good in Argentina and so poor in sack why do you farm here. You like snow 6 mo of the yr???Mabey you are in political trouble there ??? Just curious if I had an inroad there and was young as you I think I may be there. NO offence meant.

No offence taken!


My dad had bought land in Canada way back in the 60s. 3 quarters... But he couldn't get residency here (if you're white have skills and a work ethic Canada is very hard to come in to)... So he got hired on with a German company that developed land (clearing, leveling etc) in South America. They worked all over.. Paraguay Uruguay... Argentina... And then communists overthrew the government in Paraguay and put dad and all those guys in jail for crimes against the country...

Strikes in the prison guard union meant they let all the prisoners go and everyone fled to Argentina.

Dad met mom there...in the late 70s And then they had me...

In the early 90s communist types and Islamic terrorists rocked the city... Bombs. Murders. In 1992 the Israeli embassy was bombed and it took the school next door with it. A preschool to highschool private school.

I was there as a preschool kid that day.


That shook my parents and then moving to Canada became one option... The other was move out of Buenos Aires proper to Cordoba where we had family...

Dad already had the land here. Mom was fluent in English ... So they immigrated.



The 90s and early 2000-1 were good to us. Cattle were decent. We grew ok crops and had lots of feed... But by 2004 we lost all local elevators, auction markets, banks, and most other businesses. Bse hit in 2003. The wet season that flooded out most of our good land hit in 2006 and then came back in 2009 with a vengence and stayed till well last year.

In between there we had bovine TB in the mix too. (Riding mountain after all).


My parents couldn't handle the stress so they split in '05... I took over dad's half... Till my mom wanted out in 2010... By then I had met the love of my life... And at the time things were booming.... Foolishly we thought the good times would keep rolling for a while yet... We farmed here in sask in 2011 and in MB before selling there to Andjelic...

I love Canada because it's familiar. It's stable. And it's a beautiful country.

I am getting more and more mad at the way it's run. My family has seen this. It ends in economic collapse. Nobody move nobody do anything nobody build anything. Private business is evil.

We've been robbed of chem saddles and tools 3 times now in sask. Vehicles get stolen in broad daylight in town. There's drugs everywhere...

Government policy stifles good paying jobs and the cost of living has doubled in a decade.

Darcy and I have a young family... And I want what's best... For them. Not sure Canada still is the answer with the way things are going lately.

When my parents came here we still had elevators every 8 miles and the crow freight rate. And orderly marketing (yeah they supported the cwb fully) that and the stability appealed to them.


Sorry I know it's rambly.



More so I'm just frustrated with the fact that we have so much potential and are throwing it away continually. We could process our resources... (I'm talking uranium lumber moly oil iron lithium grain salt we have it all)... But instead we worry about petty bullshit and over regulation that favours only multinationals. We're killing small business and innovation... We are hypocrites inviting all these people into our country but have no jobs for them. And housing that's through the stratosphere.

What kins of country will this be in 20 years when my boy... A white male... Goes out into the world? By 2050 I think it is visible minorities will make up 80% of the population... I'm not racist. But will there be any opportunities for him? Societies grow boom thrive and then disintegrate and collapse. Reply With Quote
Jan 2, 2018 | 15:30 15 Klaus I have always enjoyed your thoughts and commentary on all topics.

This last post tells me a lot of who you are and what you have seen.

This explains the wisdom and insight you have that is far beyond the years you have behind you.

Keep sharing and and stay involved. Reply With Quote
Jan 2, 2018 | 15:44 16 Klause, your account of your parents' saga makes me feel pretty privileged. Even the dirty, dusty, crazy eighties and the bad memories that are engrained on my mind don't hold a candle to bombs dropping and violent regimes. But it is sad to see the naivety of these governments who are implimenting policies that are destroying our industry as in UPOV, now allowing potash companies to merge and not allowing open running rights on monopoly railways, just to name a few. We are being royally screwed over and allowing it happen without so much as a whimper. Reply With Quote
Jan 2, 2018 | 19:38 17 Klaus, some of the best defenders of Canada are the Canadians who more recently came from other countries. A conversation that always stuck with me was one of a wonderful man who influenced many telling of how his family left the Volga valley he witnessed as a child passing burned out villages. They came to Saskatchewan with nothing had little here, then the dry 30s hit and even food was scarce, I asked what kept them going the simple answer was: hope: they knew it would get better. While many of us have never witnessed events so traumatic as your story Klaus, and this one, we have watched our parents and lived our own story of building, & maintaining during difficult times, and anyone farming today has likely a set of parallels in the analogs of their family.

Hope was the one thing in common from many who tell these stories, more or less traumatic, it is the ardent embrace of a country that provided opportunity for them and mostly for their children.

Prosperity takes a long time to build, and is often the result of an environment which enables growth and respects the will of those who would. Prosperity can be more difficult to maintain than to build because prosperity has it's own set of challenges. While many in government today have not lived with their own set of stories of challenges driven by some aspect of deprivation, we have to hope many listen to these stories, and know at the very least what it takes to continue to enable the builders.

We hope they take a moment to comprehend the difference that todays' government policy makes to the next generation, and so I Thank you for sharing.

Happy New Year! Reply With Quote
Jan 2, 2018 | 19:59 18 What is missing from the Sask Pulse Grower report is the Pulse Canada report.

Levy from SPG growers supports Pulse Canada. SPG invests money in Pulse Canada which in turn does a lot of leg work for pulse growers on many fronts, including transportation, and international representation, which is why their annual report should be part of the SPG meeting. I asked for while I was on the board but did not receive consensus of the board to have this, I still believe it is of interest and a form of accountability and source of information for producers as international events shape the world we export in.

Because Pulse Canada represents pulse grower on international issues and events, giving us a printed &/or presented account of the events of the year should be part of the provincial boards annual report at the member associations meetings. Indeed, his year we have had many events which impacted our trade, most years we see issues of interest to the provincial membership.

Pulse Canada reporting is missing from SPG annual reporting. Reply With Quote
Jan 2, 2018 | 22:04 19 Klaus. I really appreciate your reply its not often anyone one Av realy bares the whole story, it is very refreshing to hear of your past, hope I didn't open any old wounds for you and your family. I feel some what like you as things have changed so much in the 50 odd yr I have been farming, mostly for the worst, sure the equipment has gotten a lot better but now you have to run like he'll to keep up why anyone thinks he needs 10,000 acres is a mystery to me anyway to each his own, thanks again for your condor. Reply With Quote