Where does electrical power really come from? ONTARIO

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Where does electrical power really come from? ONTARIO

Dec 23, 2017 | 07:22 1 This from the ieso.ca site showing even "live" 5 minute costs, generating capacity etc in Ontario


Saturday, December 23, 2017
Demand
Hourly Ontario Demand
at 7:00 a.m. EST
15,210 MW
Projected Demand
at 8:00 a.m. EST
16,322 MW
Today's Projected Peak
at 5:00 p.m. EST
18,710 MW
Supply
Hourly Output by Fuel Type (Transmission-Connected)
at 6:00 a.m. EST
Nuclear
11,132 MW
Wind
248 MW
Hydro
3,676 MW
Solar
0 MW
Gas
549 MW
Biofuel
30 MW
Hourly Imports
1,614 MW
Hourly Exports
2,744 MW
Generator Availability at Peak
at 5:00 p.m. EST
27,256 MW
Price
Hourly Ontario Price
at 7:00 a.m. EST
0.29 ¢/kWh
Average Weighted Price (December)
month-to-date
1.78 ¢/kWh
Global Adjustment 1st Estimate (November)
8.39 ¢/kWh Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 07:26 2 Apparently sun's not yet up in Ontario.

My theory is that solar panels might as well be shut down in all of December and January. We'll see what real data should lead us to believe. Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 07:32 3 There are periods of time in a day that utilities could get power for next to nothing (eg. a third of a cent per Kwh)

Get charging those new batteries eh. Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 07:55 4 Here's an even better data source for Ontario generating capacity and output of each potential electrical source

http://www.ieso.ca/en/power-data/data-directory

You'll see yesterday that not one solar site in Ontario had produced even one sixth of its generating capacity (even during its best hour during the day) and that not one site produced any usable power during two thirds of the day.

Thats the definition of "dismal".

one sixth times one third equals next to nothing.


Put few eggs in that basket Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Dec 23, 2017 | 08:12 5 While outside turning grain yesterday....I noticed how low the sun was in the sky, during the time of year with the shortest daytime hours .....although solar power generation was the furthest thing from my mind. Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 09:08 6 New solar farm just opened in Brooks. 17 MW cost $30 million of which the Alberta government payed half. Deal was made by the former Conservative government. What is interesting is that in this case the cost per installed watt net to the company after subsidy is 88 cents per watt. At this price and at today's mandated by government max price of 6.8 cents per kilowatt this installation could be payed off in just under 10 years. At present after government subsidy for me to install a grid tie ground mount system on my farm it cost $2.60 an installed watt so solar power installation prices have to drop by 65% before they make sense on the farm. At the present price of $2.60 an installed watt it would take almost 30 years to pay off at today's power prices. Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 09:25 7 Does anyone here on Agriville use solar for their house or yard? Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 09:36 8 snowmobile shack works good. but if you spend to much time solving world problems in there it may go dark lol. Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 10:09 9 and then we use a gasoline backup generator. Reply With Quote
Dec 23, 2017 | 10:38 10
Quote Originally Posted by oneoff View Post
There are periods of time in a day that utilities could get power for next to nothing (eg. a third of a cent per Kwh)

Get charging those new batteries eh.
They’ve been stalling a big pumped storage project for years here that would do just that. The only thing proposed that makes any kind of sense and it’s about the only thing they don’t approve Reply With Quote
ajl
Dec 23, 2017 | 10:45 11 I like the fact that the value of power produced is 1/5 of the global adjustment factor. It would be funny if it was not so serious. The American that you pay to take power must be laughing at how stupid Canuckistanians are. Reply With Quote
Dec 25, 2017 | 07:36 12 Just found out what that 8.39 cent Global Adjustment charge is....mentioned in first quoted post


Its an extra 8.39 cent (November estimate) to cover all sorts of Ontario Hydro costs.

Hidden in residential kwh billing; but listed separate for bigger customers.

Its to cover huge losses on export sales of electricity to USA who of course only pay fair market value. But guaranteed electrical production contracts; payments for contracted but unwanted or not usable idled contracted generation have to be paid and recovered by such means. In short it can and does cover whatever programs management says it will cover. Even energy conservation initiatives that ARE OXYMORONS AT BEST Reply With Quote
Dec 25, 2017 | 07:38 13 What consumer fee does Alberta use to cover the cost of shutting down its coal fired power plants????? Reply With Quote
Dec 25, 2017 | 08:38 14 Oneoff, the companies will be compensated over 14 years for shuttering their coal plants early and the compensation will come from the carbon tax on industrial emitters. While consumers pay a carbon tax on natural gas, propane, diesel and gas, industrial emitters pay a separate additional carbon tax. The left loves taxes! Reply With Quote
Dec 25, 2017 | 10:59 15 What about the possibility that consumers pay for their electrical utility's decisions through their regular electrical billing


AND the carbon tax is just an additional tax grab that will apply in all provinces (including Sask for that matter) Reply With Quote