Oh boy... We really should stop growing beans up here...

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Oh boy... We really should stop growing beans up here...

Klause's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 15:55 1 Hard enough to compete on crops we can produce well.


Interestingly Argentina has now surpassed New Orleans and Brazil's ports for soy production.


https://www.bcr.com.ar/eng/verNotici...?IdNoticia=116 Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 16:06 2 bean genetics are improving fast up here. better economics than 7 dollar peas. Demand for food and feed is increasing every day Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 17:16 3 Even Manitoba can’t compete against a country with two crops in a year and were land locked with a stupid liberal Gov. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 17:28 4 Exactly saskfarmer we weren't locked up when the conservatives were running things were we?? Hahaha Reply With Quote
jcv
Dec 4, 2017 | 18:14 5 Genetics maybe improving, but maybe at a compromise of quality? Think oil content gets borderline as we move further north, and maybe a issue meeting specs. Oil content is higher in Ontario than in Manitoba Reply With Quote
ajl
Dec 4, 2017 | 18:21 6 Canola, snow, canola it is. Just too bad it is so disease prone and one company controls all the seed supplies. Been hearing about some of the incredible yields US farmers got this year. With crappy geography, climate, and government, Canuckistan will be an irrelevant third world backwater soon. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 18:46 7 Western Canada did well when we had lower priced land equipment and grew hrs durum oats barley few pulses and canola. Now USA land prices Equipment totally nuts and Same price paid but mr farmer grow more your so good.

South america and Russia will hand us our lunch.

But keep telling the world like JT were so special. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 18:47 8 If the only way you can pencil a profit is canola snow canola you are probably not a great farmer. i would rather have a 3 yr rotation and up my canola yield 10 bpa plus made over $200/ac on wheat this year yea wheat is real shitty lol. hard to market without giving away a bunch of profit to the elevator cos yes but still a good crop but still a good crop with very careful marketing essential. Beans here yield same as canola on a wet year, you do the math on that. Yes this year bean profits were not as good as wheat or canola but other years they were better.


one thing about the sask farmer is you guys love jumping in and out of crops. one year half the farm is lentils and they get diseased and go 10. so next year half the farm is soy and theres a drought. maybe throw 5000 ac of hemp in for a little experiment lol. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 18:54 9 We're lovin soybeans here and they're now an important part of our rotation. Economics are good. Demand seems strong. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 18:59 10 Bmg I never jump in our rotation has been similar since we started direct seeding. Peas or lentils canola and hrs durum or barley oats.

Tried soy for 8years it’s just not ready yet but might make it one day.
Tried corn years ago just did once not big area.
Did try chick peas before they became big then died.

So I always will try but stick with what I can grow.

But you can’t compete against South America with our costs. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 19:34 11
Quote Originally Posted by SASKFARMER3 View Post
Bmg I never jump in our rotation has been similar since we started direct seeding. Peas or lentils canola and hrs durum or barley oats.

Tried soy for 8years it’s just not ready yet but might make it one day.
Tried corn years ago just did once not big area.
Did try chick peas before they became big then died.

So I always will try but stick with what I can grow.

But you can’t compete against South America with our costs.
when i said sask farmer i didnt mean you. Kind of a broad generalization definately doesnt apply to all farms. Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 20:02 12 Got it.

Yes the crop jump mentality. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 20:05 13 SF3 seems the only thing you can really do is sell out before it crashes. If you can't compete get out. I'm sure there are a couple BTO's round there willing to take on an impressive operation like yours! Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 20:45 14
Quote Originally Posted by SASKFARMER3 View Post

Tried soy for 8years it’s just not ready yet but might make it one day.
This statement scares me, do you really think Canadians will take an entire 8 years( 2 election cycles) to figure out that our current amateur is just not ready? Or will we learn faster than that?


Sorry, couldn't resist. Reply With Quote
blackpowder's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 21:13 15 Tryed beans here this year.
Wont bother again. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 21:21 16
Quote Originally Posted by AlbertaFarmer5 View Post
This statement scares me, do you really think Canadians will take an entire 8 years( 2 election cycles) to figure out that our current amateur is just not ready? Or will we learn faster than that?


Sorry, couldn't resist.
Yep, some are slow learners, LOL. Reply With Quote
Klause's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 21:27 17 A lot of people don't understand that part...


Some places in the world grow crop after crop... plant one, harvest the next... Other places like the black earth region grow long and short season crops, harvest for 3 months and seed for 2 or 3.

We're paying the same for land growing 1 crop a year, and struggling to get that off (I realize MB has a longer season... but there isn't that much land south of the #16 in MB compared to the rest of the prairies).


And MB beans are still low in protein which makes them less desirable compared to US/Brazil/Argentina/ or Eastern Canada beans... Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Dec 4, 2017 | 22:03 18
Quote Originally Posted by Nudge View Post
SF3 seems the only thing you can really do is sell out before it crashes. If you can't compete get out. I'm sure there are a couple BTO's round there willing to take on an impressive operation like yours!
BTO's and young guys here will take on ANY LAND at all. Good plan, thinking hard about freedom 65. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 22:06 19 I don't know... To me farming is pretty good in Canada overall. But yes long term competitiveness is a concern if governments keep regulating and taxing us more and more. Best thing that could happen would be for the grain seed and chem oligopolies to be torn apart but we are going the other way right now.

I understand in Brazil and Argentina they dont pay tua on rr seed traits and Russia well its Russia we were dumb enough to send our university researchers over there to give them the varieties and show them how to grow them lol. Reply With Quote
Dec 4, 2017 | 23:02 20 Argentina has exported more soy meal than any other country on an annual basis ever since 2000.
Canada imports zero soy meal from Argentina.
The prairie provinces imported about 350,000 tonnes of soy meal from the US in 2016.
Talk of a crush plant in Manitoba. Looks like the domestic market would really have to grow to make it a success.
Interesting that Argentina exports about twice as many soybeans as Canada but produces about 7 times as much. Reply With Quote
Dec 5, 2017 | 04:28 21
Quote Originally Posted by bgmb View Post
bean genetics are improving fast up here. better economics than 7 dollar peas. Demand for food and feed is increasing every day
bean genetics + new stress relieve fertilizers will keep improving the feasibility outside traditional soy areas. This a fertilizer we work with farmers in the U.S and South America on soybeans that help protect the plant from stress, seen yield bumps from university and independent trials as high as 35% on soy and consistently over 10. More and more of this tech is coming i think.

http://northernnutrients.com/wp-cont..._Magnetar_.pdf

http://northernnutrients.com/wp-cont...l-trials_2.pdf Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Dec 5, 2017 | 07:27 22 No i never said we should stop growing them, I look at it this way

Canada and USA with all our extra bullshit costs on every thing from Seed to Fert to Fuel to Equipment and we cant continue to pay triple costs and grow the same amount for less money.

Our transportation system is left to two railroads that care only about one thing their shareholders. Reply With Quote
Klause's Avatar Dec 5, 2017 | 08:41 23
Quote Originally Posted by SASKFARMER3 View Post
No i never said we should stop growing them, I look at it this way

Canada and USA with all our extra bullshit costs on every thing from Seed to Fert to Fuel to Equipment and we cant continue to pay triple costs and grow the same amount for less money.

Our transportation system is left to two railroads that care only about one thing their shareholders.
Yup... That's just it...

We're too far from markets, and we keep dismantling all the things that gave us a competitive edge because you have people in boards, and in the government's ears that are clueless...

How do you compete with export countries that can literally drive their grain to port in the same time it takes us to haul it to an elevator, that loads it on a train, that has to haul it 3000KM...


I'll refer to what my economist friend said....

Corporate farms, as inefficient and beaurocratic as they are, function in Russia, Europe, South America, Australia, and the US.

The only major agriculture area they always, with complete certainty, fail, is Canada.
Reply With Quote
Dec 5, 2017 | 08:47 24 They fail in Canada because the new BTO desires shiny snowfence of grain bins and they sit on boards without realizing their grain should be moving to port as soon as the combine starts....

Look at the boards and their directors ....

Some are chasing higher yielding varieties to stay competitive without realizing there isn't a market nor a transportation system to handle it....

I guess they make it up on stationary volume.... Reply With Quote
Dec 5, 2017 | 13:02 25 Agree completely that we are at a competitive disadvantage. Eventually when we have enough years of low incomes land and equipment costs come in line. One huge factor we do have is much lower interest compared to South America and Russia. Reply With Quote
Dec 5, 2017 | 16:33 26 Soy is the future , this year only a minor hiccup. We will get a soy crusher before a Pasta plant! Reply With Quote