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Klause's Avatar Oct 31, 2017 | 08:02 1 http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/business...-ihs-1.4375789


Well darn maybe we did need EnergyEast and it was the liberals that killed it. Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 08:09 2 Listening to an interview yesterday of an Alberta Conservative.....although he didn't support the ND's or the Liberals, his words were something in the line of the Conservatives had 44 years in Alberta and Harper had 10 years as a Federal leader.....and they couldn't get it done.....now that is a man I could vote for.....realistic ...... Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 08:21 3
Quote Originally Posted by Klause View Post
http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/business...-ihs-1.4375789


Well darn maybe we did need EnergyEast and it was the liberals that killed it.
What I read was Keystone XL and Trans mountain will be enough for awhile. There is less chance Transmountain will get built if Kenney gets in as he will definitely piss BC off with his confrontational style, threats and bluster. More chance with Notley.

Why not build more refinery's in Alberta, create more jobs in Canada? Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 08:24 4 It seems raw product has to travel to the population to be refined. ....

I agree it should be refined here but it is beyond my way of thinking why it's done the way it is....

This doesn't matter if you are talking oil, durum, wheat etc etc Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 08:41 5 It usually comes down to economics. There is over capacity in refining and it is too expensive to build refineries. But we had a lot of years to invest in refining capacity. Maybe this should have been a priority over raw exports to the US. Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 08:46 6 How can money be the problem as for building refinery. Gas up .11/litre today, lets see you oil lovers spin this and put on the NDs Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 09:03 7 If you refine all the oil in Alberta from oil sands it still needs to be shipped by pipeline or rail. Wake the fuck up!!!!. Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 09:12 8 No need to build refineries. For decades paying pennies in royalties for every BOE produced, to ship out of country to texas refineries. Maybe the government can use reduced royalties to entice the construction of refineries? oh wait...nevermind.
As long as the millennial generation can afford all those jacked up trucks and white rimmed sunglasses, who cares? Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 09:14 9 You would think the environmentalists, Trudeau, Montreal's bigmouth mayor, NDP would value human life when inflicting their agenda on national policy.

How often do we need 100 to burn to death after a railway accident before the Liberals will be okay with pipelines? Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 11:04 10
Quote Originally Posted by sofa.king View Post
If you refine all the oil in Alberta from oil sands it still needs to be shipped by pipeline or rail. Wake the fuck up!!!!.
How about in 1 litre ,18.9,205 litre containers.nice clean product easy to clean up if accident, less environmental damage, and as a spin off we could make our own containers out of the plastic, Not an economist but shipping raw product 3000 mi and then shipping refined product back, seems counter productive.
It kind of baffles the mind you as farmers don't expect to recover costs of machinery, land with 1 crop so how come you all jump to the conclusion we can't possibly fund a refinery, all you have to do is jack up the price of gas, like the oil cos did today and wall you have cash to burn. Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 12:32 11 All fuel used in western canada is refined here so there is no shipping it back 3000 miles. There is lots of gas and diesel shipped from regina south to northern montana so it seems we have plenty of refining capacity. Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 12:46 12
Quote Originally Posted by sofa.king View Post
All fuel used in western canada is refined here so there is no shipping it back 3000 miles. There is lots of gas and diesel shipped from regina south to northern montana so it seems we have plenty of refining capacity.
once again thanks to Grant Devine Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 19:10 13 Where your gas comes from


Rising and unfathomable fuel prices make oil companies easy targets for our wrath. But there are a number of factors that play into how we get the gas in our tank and where it comes from.

RICHARD RUSSELL
Special to The Globe and Mail
March 24, 2012

Engineers are always looking for ways to make the internal combustion engine more efficient. The central component of this search for better mileage and lower emissions is the fuel itself. Oil companies have to work hand in hand with engine manufacturers as new developments and regulations emerge.

Rising and unfathomable fuel prices make oil companies easy targets for our wrath. But there are a number of factors that play into how we get the gas in our tank and where it comes from.

There are a large number of retail outlets that sell passenger car fuel – from Canadian Tire and large grocery chains to Esso, Shell and other oil companies. It is common practice for all of these outlets, dozens in any city, to get their fuel product from one single refinery.

You can see several big trucks lined up with their hoses attached to different outlets at a refinery. I once took a picture of Shell, Texaco and Petro-Canada trucks filling up at an Esso refinery.

The point is that the refineries have contracts to supply gasoline, diesel, fuel oil, aircraft fuel, etc., tailored to the specific requirements of that customer.

All gasoline is not created equal. Shell, for example, boasts about the cleansing properties of the gasoline at its stations. It requires non-Shell refineries across the country to blend its gasoline to its specifications, to use the required additives.

Shell is one of the companies supplying Top Tier gasoline – fuel that exceeds the minimum standard for detergents. Meeting that standard results in additional costs at the refinery. Chances are the fuel you buy at a discount chain does not meet these same standards.

So the few refineries scattered across the country have to supply a wide variety of customers, many with different requirements. But where are these refineries and how big are they? Using the latest figures from the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute and the Conference Board of Canada, they are as follows:

Irving Oil, Saint John, N.B., 300,000
Ultramar, Levis, Que., 265,000
Imperial Oil, Edmonton, 185,000
Suncor, Edmonton, 135,000
Suncor, Montreal, 130,000
Imperial Oil, Nanticoke, Ont., 120,000
Imperial Oil, Sarnia, Ont., 120,000
North Atlantic Refining, Come-By-Chance, Nfld., 115,000
Shell, Scotford, Alta., 100,000
Consumers’ Co-Op, Regina, Sask., 100,000
Imperial Oil, Dartmouth, N.S.; 89,000
Suncor, Sarnia, Ont., 85,000
Nova, Sarnia, Ont.; 78,000
Shell, Sarnia, Ont., 75,000
Chevron, Burnaby, B.C., 55,000
Husky, Lloydminster, Ata., 29,000
Suncor, Mississauga, Ont., 15,600
Moose Jaw Refining, Moose Jaw, Sask., 14,000
Husky, Prince George, B.C., 12,000.

Virtually all of the crude oil used in refineries west of Sarnia comes from Canada. Because of the vast distances involved, costs, complexities and environment issues in running pipelines across this country, crude oil used in the eastern refineries comes from offshore, a limited amount from Canada's offshore wells, but the majority comes from foreign countries.

The sources of the foreign oil are: Algeria (17,942 cubic metres per day), United Kingdom-North Sea (15,370), Nigeria (11,835), Norway (11,483), Saudi Arabia (10,922), Iraq (6,376), Venezuela (4,218), Mexico (4,089), United States (1,857) and 29,999 cubic metres a day is purchased on the open market from other sources.

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In the last year for which it has complete figures, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers reports 35.7 per cent of the refinery capacity in the country was used to produce gasoline, 23.9 per cent for diesel, 12.8 per cent for fuel oil, 4.6 per cent for petrochemical feedstock and 4.2 per cent for aviation fuel.

Something to think about? In the last 40 years, 31 refineries have been closed across the country.

globedrive@globeandmail.com Reply With Quote
Nov 1, 2017 | 11:29 14 More stats on oil.

http://www.oilsandsmagazine.com/news/2016/7/5/canadian-refining-capacity-versu-the-rest-of-the-world

Enjoy Reply With Quote