This is for climate change ken and barbie

Commodity Marketing

Tools

This is for climate change ken and barbie

Oct 30, 2017 | 09:11 1 https://www.spectator.co.uk/2017/05/wind-turbines-are-neither-clean-nor-green-and-they-provide-zero-global-energy/ This sums up all the bullshit about green energy. Hope grassy and chucky read this. Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2017 | 11:21 2 That sums it up for sure and I doubt Chucky will comment because when someone posts something that doesn't fit his narrative he just covers his ears and screams "I can't hear you" Reply With Quote
SASKFARMER3's Avatar Oct 30, 2017 | 11:44 3 I for one have been on this planet go a few falls and just like clock work it strikes Halloween and the fall run is done you put stuff away and winter starts. No climate change same shit as always but every once and a while you get a chance in November. We had a few and that is also normal but not climate change.k Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Oct 30, 2017 | 12:34 4 Last year game was over Oct, holy shit it changed October was nicer, better panic guys.
On CBC this morning WAY MORE CO2 than thought and we will NEVER meet targets... MORE PANIC, NEED MORE TAXES to save the world!!

Justin will have a world saving announcement any time.... Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Oct 30, 2017 | 12:39 5
Quote Originally Posted by sofa.king View Post
https://www.spectator.co.uk/2017/05/wind-turbines-are-neither-clean-nor-green-and-they-provide-zero-global-energy/ This sums up all the bullshit about green energy. Hope grassy and chucky read this.
Even put together, wind and photovoltaic solar are supplying less than 1 per cent of global energy demand. From the International Energy Agency’s 2016 Key Renewables Trends, we can see that wind provided 0.46 per cent of global energy consumption in 2014, and solar and tide combined provided 0.35 per cent. Remember this is total energy, not just electricity, which is less than a fifth of all final energy, the rest being the solid, gaseous, and liquid fuels that do the heavy lifting for heat, transport and industry.

Meanwhile, world energy demand has been growing at about 2 per cent a year for nearly 40 years. Between 2013 and 2014, again using International Energy Agency data, it grew by just under 2,000 terawatt-hours.

If wind turbines were to supply all of that growth but no more, how many would need to be built each year? The answer is nearly 350,000, since a two-megawatt turbine can produce about 0.005 terawatt-hours per annum. That’s one-and-a-half times as many as have been built in the world since governments started pouring consumer funds into this so-called industry in the early 2000s.

A two-megawatt wind turbine weighs about 250 tonnes, including the tower, nacelle, rotor and blades. Globally, it takes about half a tonne of coal to make a tonne of steel. Add another 25 tonnes of coal for making the cement and you’re talking 150 tonnes of coal per turbine. Now if we are to build 350,000 wind turbines a year (or a smaller number of bigger ones), just to keep up with increasing energy demand, that will require 50 million tonnes of coal a year. That’s about half the EU’s hard coal–mining output.


The point of running through these numbers is to demonstrate that it is utterly futile, on a priori grounds, even to think that wind power can make any significant contribution to world energy supply, let alone to emissions reductions, without ruining the planet. As the late David MacKay pointed out years back, the arithmetic is against such unreliable renewables. Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2017 | 12:55 6 "Forgive me if you have heard this before, but I have a commercial interest in coal." From the author.

Now why would we take the opinion of someone who owns interests in coal and believe that he is objectively looking at wind or any other renewable form of energy?

For one thing he ignores the shift in Germany which as developed country is more advanced on this issue. Looking at a world scale that undoubtledly skews the results away from what a single country like Germany has accomplished.

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/05/08/germany-breaks-solar-record-gets-85-electricity-renewables/
May 8th, 2017 by Steve Hanley

On April 30, Germany established a new national record for renewable energy use. Part of that day (during the long May 1 weekend), 85% of all the electricity consumed in Germany was being produced from renewables such as wind, solar, biomass, and hydroelectric power. Patrick Graichen of Agora Energiewende Initiative says a combination of breezy and sunny weather in the north and warm weather in the south saw Germany’s May 1 holiday weekend powered almost exclusively by renewable resources. [Note: This paragraph has been updated to correct an error.]

Renewables in Germany“Most of Germany’s coal-fired power stations were not even operating on Sunday, April 30th, with renewable sources accounting for 85 per cent of electricity across the country,” he said. “Nuclear power sources, which are planned to be completely phased out by 2022, were also severely reduced.”

Graichen says days like April 30 will become “completely normal” by 2030, as the federal government’s Energiewende, or energy revolution, begins to really reap the benefits of the investments made in renewable energy resources since 2010. German energy policies have been the subject of frequent attacks in the media, mostly from fossil fuel interests who would be only too happy to see it fail. However, chancellor Angela Merkel is a staunch supporter of the initiative and the German public is firmly behind it as well.

Remember Steve Harper signed an agreement with the G7 saying we should stop using fossil energy by 2100. Do you know why?

Why don't you ask Sask power why they are investing in wind? Wind is only one option. Hydrogen fuel cells and solar may end up being the a bigger part of the solution. Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2017 | 13:37 7
Quote Originally Posted by chuckChuck View Post
"Forgive me if you have heard this before, but I have a commercial interest in coal." From the author.

Now why would we take the opinion of someone who owns interests in coal and believe that he is objectively looking at wind or any other renewable form of energy?

For one thing he ignores the shift in Germany which as developed country is more advanced on this issue. Looking at a world scale that undoubtledly skews the results away from what a single country like Germany has accomplished.

https://cleantechnica.com/2017/05/08/germany-breaks-solar-record-gets-85-electricity-renewables/
May 8th, 2017 by Steve Hanley

On April 30, Germany established a new national record for renewable energy use. Part of that day (during the long May 1 weekend), 85% of all the electricity consumed in Germany was being produced from renewables such as wind, solar, biomass, and hydroelectric power. Patrick Graichen of Agora Energiewende Initiative says a combination of breezy and sunny weather in the north and warm weather in the south saw Germany’s May 1 holiday weekend powered almost exclusively by renewable resources. [Note: This paragraph has been updated to correct an error.]

Renewables in Germany“Most of Germany’s coal-fired power stations were not even operating on Sunday, April 30th, with renewable sources accounting for 85 per cent of electricity across the country,” he said. “Nuclear power sources, which are planned to be completely phased out by 2022, were also severely reduced.”

Graichen says days like April 30 will become “completely normal” by 2030, as the federal government’s Energiewende, or energy revolution, begins to really reap the benefits of the investments made in renewable energy resources since 2010. German energy policies have been the subject of frequent attacks in the media, mostly from fossil fuel interests who would be only too happy to see it fail. However, chancellor Angela Merkel is a staunch supporter of the initiative and the German public is firmly behind it as well.

Remember Steve Harper signed an agreement with the G7 saying we should stop using fossil energy by 2100. Do you know why?

Why don't you ask Sask power why they are investing in wind? Wind is only one option. Hydrogen fuel cells and solar may end up being the a bigger part of the solution.
Hydrogen fuel cells are not a source of energy. They. Are at best, a a very energy inefficient means of storing/ transporting energy Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2017 | 19:56 8 https://www.iea.org/newsroom/news/2017/october/solar-pv-grew-faster-than-any-other-fuel-in-2016-opening-a-new-era-for-solar-pow.html

From the International Energy Agency
Solar PV grew faster than any other fuel in 2016, opening a new era for solar power

4 October 2017
New solar PV capacity grew by 50% last year, with China accounting for almost half of the global expansion, according to the International Energy Agency’s latest renewables market analysis and forecast. For the first time, solar PV additions rose faster than any other fuel, surpassing the net growth in coal.

Boosted by a strong solar PV market, renewables accounted for almost two-thirds of net new power capacity around the world last year, with almost 165 gigawatts (GW) coming online, according to the new report, Renewables 2017. Renewables will continue to have a strong growth in coming years. By 2022, renewable electricity capacity should increase by 43%.

“We see renewables growing by about 1,000 GW by 2022, which equals about half of the current global capacity in coal power, which took 80 years to build,” said Dr Fatih Birol, the executive director of the IEA. “What we are witnessing is the birth of a new era in solar PV. We expect that solar PV capacity growth will be higher than any other renewable technology through 2022.”

This year’s renewable forecastis 12% higher than last year, thanks mostly to solar PV upward revisions in China and India. Three countries – China, India and the United States – will account for two-thirds of global renewable expansion by 2022. Total solar PV capacity by then would exceed the combined total power capacities of India and Japan today.

In power generation, renewable electricity is expected to grow by more than a third by 2022 to over 8,000 terawatt hours, which is equivalent to the total power consumption of China, India and Germany combined. By then, renewables will account for 30% of power generation, up from 24% in 2016. The growth in renewable generation will be twice as large as that of gas and coal combined. Though coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in 2022, renewables close the generation gap with coal by half in just five years.

The deployment in solar PV and wind last year was accompanied by record-low auction prices, which fell as low as 3 cents per kwh (or kilowatt hour). Low announced prices for solar and wind were recorded in a variety of places, such as India, the United Arab Emirates, Mexico and Chile. These announced contract prices for solar PV and wind power purchase agreements are increasingly comparable or lower than generation cost of newly built gas and coal power plants.

China remains the undisputed leader of renewable electricity capacity expansion over the forecast period with over 360 GW of capacity coming online, or 40% of the global total. China’s renewables growth is largely driven by concerns about air pollution and capacity targets that were outlined in the country’s 13th five-year plan to 2020. In fact, China already exceeded its 2020 solar PV target three years ahead of time and is set to achieve its onshore wind target in 2019. Still, the growing cost of renewable subsidies and grid integration issues remain two important challenges to further expansion.

Under an accelerated case – where government policy lifts barriers to growth – IEA analysis finds that renewable capacity growth could be boosted by another 30%, totalling an extra 1,150 GW by 2022 led by China. Solar PV and wind capacity in China could by then reach twice the total power capacity of Japan today.

India’s move to address the financial health of its utilities and tackle grid-integration issues drive a more optimistic forecast. By 2022, India renewable capacity will more than double. This growth is enough to overtake renewable expansion in the European Union for the first time. Solar PV and wind together represent 90% of India’s capacity growth as auctions yielded some of the world’s lowest prices for both technologies.

Despite policy uncertainties at the federal level, the United States remains the second-largest growth market for renewables. The main drivers for onshore wind and solar – such as multi-year federal tax incentives combined with renewable portfolio standards as well as state-level policies for distributed solar PV – remain strong. Still, the current uncertainty over proposed federal tax reforms, international trade and energy policies could alter the economic attractiveness of renewables and hamper their growth over our forecast period.

The report also provides detailed analysis on the renewable consumption of electric cars and off-grid solar deployment in Africa and developing Asia. Off-grid capacity in these regions will more than triple reaching over 3 000 MW in 2022 from industrial applications, solar home systems (SHSs) and mini-grids driven by government electrification programmes and private sector initiatives. While this represents less than 5% of total PV capacity installed in both regions, the economic impact is nonetheless significant, and brings basic electricity services to almost 70 million more people in developing Asia and sub-Saharan Africa in the next five years.

Power consumption of EVs – including cars, two- and-three wheelers and buses – is expected to double over the next five years, with renewable electricity estimated to represent almost 30% of their consumption by 2022, up from 26% today. EVs play a complementary role to biofuels, which represent 80% of growth in renewable energy consumption in transport. However, the share of renewables in total road transport energy consumption remains limited, increasing only from 4% in 2016 to almost 5% in 2022.

Explore Renewables 2017 in more detail on Renewables 2017: Key Findings.
Last edited by chuckChuck; Oct 30, 2017 at 19:58.
Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2017 | 20:06 9 Renewables 2017

https://www.iea.org/renewables/ Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2017 | 20:09 10 World Energy Outlook 2017

The global energy scene is in a state of flux, with large-scale shifts in the global energy system. These include the rapid deployment and deep declines in the costs of major renewable energy technologies; a growing shift towards electricity in energy use across the globe; profound changes in China’s economy and energy policy, moving consumption away from coal; and the continued surge in shale gas and tight oil production in the United States.

These changes provide the backdrop for the World Energy Outlook 2017, to be released on 14 November, which includes a full update of energy demand and supply projections to 2040 based on different scenarios. The projections are accompanied by detailed analyses of their impact on energy industries and investment, as well as implications for energy security and the environment.

The report this year includes a focus on China, which examines how China’s choices could reshape the global outlook for all fuels and technologies. It also has a focus on natural gas, which explores how the rise of shale gas and LNG are changing the global gas market as well as the opportunities and risks for gas in the transition to a cleaner energy system.

The WEO-2017 also introduces a major new scenario – the Sustainable Development Scenario – that outlines an integrated approach to achieving internationally agreed objectives on climate change, air quality and universal access to modern energy.

World Energy Outlook 2017 is now available for pre-order. The WEO 2017 table of contents is also available. Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2017 | 21:37 11 Some of you guys Probably had a hard time giving up steel wheel tractors Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Oct 30, 2017 | 22:15 12 GERMANY?????? A poster child for the Unreliables?


http://boereport.com/2017/10/16/germ...-fossil-fuels/

The Unreliables cause far more problems than they are worth at this point in time.

As both Germany and Australia have found out in spades.
Last edited by fjlip; Oct 30, 2017 at 22:18.
Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Oct 30, 2017 | 22:17 13 Germany's wild gamble on green energy doesn't pay off big time.

Over a Trillion bucks spent and it may have even caused CO2 production to go UP.

[Germany's wild gamble on green energy doesn't pay off big time. Over a Trillion bucks spent and it may have even caused CO2 production to go UP. http://dailycaller.com/2017/02/28/germany-facing-mass-blackouts-because-the-wind-and-sun-wont-cooperate/ It looks like some people need a schooling in basic solar physics pertaining to the earth. That ain't gonna happen in this country.
It looks like some people need a schooling in basic solar physics pertaining to the earth.

That ain't gonna happen in this country. Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Oct 30, 2017 | 22:20 14
Quote Originally Posted by mustardman View Post
Some of you guys Probably had a hard time giving up steel wheel tractors
Diesel power is latest reliable technology that feeds the world, Wind and Solar are back to the horse and buggy tech, where we starve. Reply With Quote
Oct 31, 2017 | 05:04 15
Quote Originally Posted by mustardman View Post
Some of you guys Probably had a hard time giving up steel wheel tractors
Yeah, you're right again mussyboy!

The only reason most of us eventually switched was because the steel wheels shook up our electronics too much. Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Oct 31, 2017 | 11:20 16 My grandparents had 32 volt WIND POWER in the 40's, let's go back to the future... Reply With Quote