With the new classes of wheat. ..

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With the new classes of wheat. ..

Jul 28, 2017 | 06:57 1 How will the new classes be priced and segregated at the elevator? Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jul 28, 2017 | 07:15 2
Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
How will the new classes be priced and segregated at the elevator?
I was thinking if I grew Lillian because sawfly was becoming a problem and I tested it for falling number and it met or exceeded the minimum CWRS class specs..... does it really matter which class it is in?

Unless these varieties had notoriously low falling numbers. Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 07:40 3 Pricing for CNHR looks like about 10% less than CWRS.
Export shipments of #2 CWRS can have a working tolerance of up to 5.4% of wheat of other classes that will blend. So as long as the CNHR(the old CWRS varieties anyway) wouldn't throw the CWRS out of spec for gluten strength it will likely get blended into the ship and sent on its way for a tidy profit. Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 07:48 4 Our current system isn't set up to segregate more classes of wheat.....it's a bulk system....who thinks this shit up..? Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 07:51 5 The people left on their own to screw us think this up!!!!
It's only human nature if there isn't any checks and bounds why wouldn't they unless of course they had some integrity. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jul 28, 2017 | 08:11 6
Quote Originally Posted by the big wheel View Post
The people left on their own to screw us think this up!!!!
It's only human nature if there isn't any checks and bounds why wouldn't they unless of course they had some integrity.
If I were to grow CNHR Lillian because of agronomic benefits and I tested it and it met or exceeded the minimum standards for the CWRS class. Then made my buyers aware......that isn't integrity? I just wish they treated me the same.

How much CWRW, at lower value, do you think is blended into CWRS at the terminals? Expect CNHR to be treated the same!

And bucket is absolutely right....its a bulk handling system....how many different bins of different classes and grades within those classes can they store seperate?
Last edited by farmaholic; Jul 28, 2017 at 08:19.
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Jul 28, 2017 | 08:36 7 If it turns out there isn't much CNHR in an elevator's gathering area they likely wouldn't start a bin.
If specs are good millers might be the best option. Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 08:48 8
Quote Originally Posted by farming101 View Post
Pricing for CNHR looks like about 10% less than CWRS.
Export shipments of #2 CWRS can have a working tolerance of up to 5.4% of wheat of other classes that will blend. So as long as the CNHR(the old CWRS varieties anyway) wouldn't throw the CWRS out of spec for gluten strength it will likely get blended into the ship and sent on its way for a tidy profit.
Mills are being picky on it mostly due to low gluten strength in CHNR.

It'll likely be all treated as a seperate product until it hits the port terminals. Then either shipped as a "other grade" or blended off into something else.

Same thing happens with winter wheat. Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 15:29 9 Never seem one of those gluten testing machines at the elevator. ...

Don't remember anyone worrying about gluten when developing new varieties.....


And I thought low gluten wheat should command a premium.....


For humour only....but it's worth thinking about Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 15:41 10 we have 6 grades at our local elevator and often depends how harvest starts new segregations not available may be started. high protein high sceenings for instance.

basically 4 milling grades hard1 hard2 apw and asw there all protein determined and minimumtest weight and screenings.

then agp Australian general purpose and feed1

at port there are the full 9 grades Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 15:57 11
Quote Originally Posted by bucket View Post
Never seem one of those gluten testing machines at the elevator. ...

Don't remember anyone worrying about gluten when developing new varieties.....


And I thought low gluten wheat should command a premium.....


For humour only....but it's worth thinking about
Sorry gluten strength is likely the wrong word.

Basically RS makes really good bread that hold together well.

Everything else makes lower quality bread that doesn't hold together.

Comes down to how good of dough and thus bread they can make with it.

Then again I don't know anything bout making bread so take it at face value. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jul 28, 2017 | 16:08 12
Quote Originally Posted by Kinger View Post
Sorry gluten strength is likely the wrong word.

Basically RS makes really good bread that hold together well.

Everything else makes lower quality bread that doesn't hold together.

Comes down to how good of dough and thus bread they can make with it.

Then again I don't know anything bout making bread so take it at face value.
That last comment was priceless.

So falling number then instead of gluten strength? ...but I thought they were kind of synonymous? Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 16:12 13
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
That last comment was priceless.

So falling number then instead of gluten strength? ...but I thought they were kind of synonymous?
No two dif issues. FN is indication of sprouting and enzyme activity. Gluten is the elasticity of dough. Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 16:36 14 Thanks for the clarification, it really comes down to what the grain creates as a finished product.

Good bread sells for more dollars than bad bread.

RS makes good bread

CPS, CNHR, etc make lower quality bread.

Hence the discount.

If it's going into feed market, I honestly have no clue which is better.

Segregation wise, it'll be a different bin. Same as canola and beans. Might be some blending but no one wants to put a load of Faller in a bin of red spring accidentally. Wouldn't be much fun.

This is likely an oversimplification but hey it's Friday.
Last edited by Kinger; Jul 28, 2017 at 16:39.
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Jul 28, 2017 | 16:49 15 Sort of like when the dumbass dumped canola on flax at the elevator..... Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Jul 28, 2017 | 18:45 16 CGC lowered tolerances for GRASSHOPPER damage...must have heard it's dry some places...just to hurt you more! Reply With Quote
ajl
Jul 28, 2017 | 19:17 17 This is a stupid system of having a 100 different classes for wheat. All this is for is keep bureaucrats employed at CGC and plant breeders etc. Most bread in the world is made from US hard red winter and most of it ends up on the same pile. We could do the same thing except when the millers want something specific they can IP if and use container shipping. The US wheat grower does not invest in tin cans all over the country side. They haul is most at harvest and keep some on farm storage. The amount spent on storage and segregation is enormous and just a loss of efficiency. Reply With Quote
Jul 28, 2017 | 19:53 18
Quote Originally Posted by ajl View Post
This is a stupid system of having a 100 different classes for wheat. All this is for is keep bureaucrats employed at CGC and plant breeders etc. Most bread in the world is made from US hard red winter and most of it ends up on the same pile. We could do the same thing except when the millers want something specific they can IP if and use container shipping. The US wheat grower does not invest in tin cans all over the country side. They haul is most at harvest and keep some on farm storage. The amount spent on storage and segregation is enormous and just a loss of efficiency.
Would it make any dif it we only had 1 class and 1 grade? Ritz still gave elevators 3 months to take delivery before any penalties kick in and left it up to farmers to negotiate with multi national company on what that penalty would be. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jul 28, 2017 | 21:22 19
Quote Originally Posted by wmoebis View Post
Would it make any dif it we only had 1 class and 1 grade? Ritz still gave elevators 3 months to take delivery before any penalties kick in and left it up to farmers to negotiate with multi national company on what that penalty would be.
........more crazy talk. Careful wmoebis, you will get labelled a whiner and complainer!

By the way, where is Gerry Ditz now anyway?

.....they get 90 days of free storage of your high priced grain, then when the prices of grain drop they can buy that cheap grain instead of taking delivery of your expensive grain. "Inventory and price management".

I wonder if there will be any delayed deliveries of earlier(summer) contracted grain this fall in lieu of cheaper uncontracted harvest time grain! .....NAH!!!!!! Reply With Quote