Planter / drill

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Planter / drill

Jun 15, 2017 | 00:18 61 Some of the best most consistent yields in this area , have come from a average family farm , that oh my god , that thinks out side the box .
They use a Flexicoil 800 frame , spaced out at 15 in , with just the valmar/ granular applicator for the canola seed and a tow between liquid cart.
Again always top end yields and virtually never sprayed for sclerotinia .
But seed hawks / and seed masters always right up there as well
Just making a point Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:19 62 And that's with those terrible Tec- no tills that are taboo .... lol
They work great Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:21 63 Over 15'years of data , over thousands of acres is enough data for me to see that it is not solely the drill you choose. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:23 64 Or planter for that matter , it may not be "the" answer to anything .... again just sharing info with fellow farmers .. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:28 65 In our area this year the guys trying the disc drills are eating some humble pie and going for the second round of seeding

Granted an ugly dry and windy year but their seedlings had no furrow protection. Disc was level with surface and they got sandblasted as soon as they popped their heads up....chopped off at the neck too young.

Maybe we benefit from a furrow for those young seeds here in the dust bowl and maybe we all need a Furrowtickler to edjimicate us now and then....as Always thanks for sharing everyone...we are all better for it...despite the anger and jealousy out there!! #rainbringsgrain...still smiling here. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:36 66 It may be just a coincidence but we have been fortunate not to have to spray an acre for flea Beatles or cutworms .
Canola crops all around us are getting pounded daily .... just sayin tweety.
Several fields locally are getting taken out and or sprayed . Again we may just be lucky .
Regardless it's a very long way from swathing let alone harvest , so time will tell here for us.
The planter may very well hit the road after harvest, it really don't matter to us , we do not sell them , or could care less if anyone else buys one.
Or it may stay , as of today , it's ok πŸ‘Œ Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:44 67
Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
It may be just a coincidence but we have been fortunate not to have to spray an acre for flea Beatles or cutworms .
Canola crops all around us are getting pounded daily .... just sayin tweety.
Several fields locally are getting taken out and or sprayed . Again we may just be lucky .
Regardless it's a very long way from swathing let alone harvest , so time will tell here for us.
The planter may very well hit the road after harvest, it really don't matter to us , we do not sell them , or could care less if anyone else buys one.
Or it may stay , as of today , it's ok πŸ‘Œ
Agree looks very impressive so far. Bring us some more pics as the year progresses. Will be very interesting to see.

I almost want to setup a campsite in our canola and watch it grow. I am hoping for some big things after this rain!! Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 04:27 68 I couldn't agree more with you furrow . We use an old Morris maxim 2 and I don't see a drill out there I would trade with . It is very light which has been a godsend in these wet years . The straw clearance is unbelievable , clears better than our 9400 bourgault deep tiller . I am really comfortable using this drill and it really grows good crops for us , and you wouldn't get $15k for it at an auction , lol. Canola is a challenge and that is why I was interested in your planter pics . I don't see a canola crop out there this year that doesn't have issues including the ones seeded with $750 k bg' s . I wouldn't mind adding liquid to this double shoot than we could do anything with it . Anxious to see your planter pics as time progresses Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 06:15 69 I have been thinking that the planter is the next leap forward in technology. I like the precision spacing, and depth, etc

Lots of work has been done with plant emergence. The first ones up are always the biggest, healthiest, highest yielding plants. Corn is the easiest. If you have a row put flags of different colours beside the plants that emerge on the first day, second, third etc. The results are obvious. This is why even emergence is so important.

Planters have the best opportunity currently to work with seed orientation. Again corn is the easiest. Point up or point down, long side vs narrow side. The orientation changes how the roots and plant will spend energy and time in establishment. Long/narrow has to do with the first leaves of the corn and how they won't touch the other plants, maximum solar panels and no rubbing damage. Apperantly 20% yield bump.

Maybe some day we will have small robots placing all these seeds for us, not unlike I used to as a young child in the home garden. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 06:47 70 Obviously, the economics of a planter improve if you are using it for more crops than just canola. But has anyone put together the entire package? Ie. reduced seed costs for canola and soybeans. Healthier crops as wider row spacing gives better airflow and less disease pressure. With soybeans, quicker emergence with the competitive nature of the beans being closer together and which also results in higher first pod set.

As to final yield of one drill vs another or a planter, most often numbers aren't statistically different. Two or three bushels isn't conclusive. Fields, operators, etc can vary so much. Find what works for you.

For our farm, we are interested in a planter in the future. But because we are reduced/no tillers, we are trying to work out how to make a planter work in residue. Strip till has our attention. But there are still issues with getting fertilizer down, enough tractor for the planter, we don't have RTK, etc. Can 3000 acres afford 2 seeding systems?

Fun to look at nonetheless, and I would love to slash canola seed costs in half. Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jun 15, 2017 | 07:49 71
Quote Originally Posted by tweety View Post

Absolutely its great to post "new" ideas, but the corn planter with canola idea has yet to show a benefit. Trend or not. Once flea beetles take a pound, frost another pound, cutworms another pound, that 2 pounds of seed you saved looks pretty expensive. Let alone the additional passes you need to make to fertilize, the disturbance, the erosion, moisture loss, the eq time, the....


There is definitely merit to this quote. If you consider tweety the Devil, I guess I'm playing Devil's Advocate on this one. But its hard to argue against the results in the pictures furrow....still impressive. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 08:13 72
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
There is definitely merit to this quote. If you consider tweety the Devil, I guess I'm playing Devil's Advocate on this one. But its hard to argue against the results in the pictures furrow....still impressive.
but .... if you seed 4.2 pounds and only half grows you still only have 2.1 pounds to work with . it is irrelevant ??? Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jun 15, 2017 | 08:28 73 Case. But tweety's point is you're only starting with 2.1 lbs. ...not alot of room for peril loses. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 09:05 74 If you are first running your seed through an auger to fill your tank. Then bouncing it off at least a couple dead end manifold towers. Then dropping it into the furrow and with the front gang and having the next two openers through some extra soil on top and then a packer....you need to seed at least 5lb. to the acre depending on your tkw.

The argument of needing to seed higher rates because of flea beetles, frost, etc I find mostly irrelevant. We had bad frost in 2015, everybody reseeded (or should have). Did not matter what rate they seeded at. Same with bugs. If they are bad enough, they eat everything. That's my observation anyway.

I have also seen JD planter vs. FC5000 side by side canola trial. The conditions were wet to muddy and the plant establishment on the planter was terrible compared to the old Flexi-coil. I don't know what the final yield was though. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 09:13 75 Very good points Jay - mo. There is no silver bullet for anything, and never will be. Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 09:14 76 Different soils and climate do better with varying seeding apparatus. History has taught us some lessons about the particular perils of flat land gumbo and dry spring conditions.

During the " dirty thirties" a lot of the topsoil blew away. Farmers were seeding with double disc press drills on pre-harrow-disced summerfallow. Consequently the very fine light soil particles were left on the surface and wind erosion was the result. In a couple of windy days the crop was cut right off by flying dirt. Southern Sask Ag then adopted the 24 inch one-way disc, average length of 9 feet. The seeder box held about 10 bushels of wheat. The heavy disc pulled up lumps to stop the blowing. Then from farmers' workshops came 15,18 and 20 foot long discers with18-20 inch dished discs on 6 inch spacing with mounted seed and fertilizer boxes. Producers devised ways to hook them together and four wheel drive tractors pulled 75 feet at our farm. In the 60's Jerome Bechard, with the use of a tow-behind tank and fan invented the air seeder on cultivator shovels. Various adaptations have been made to that idea. Lately the push has been to narrower and narrower openers until today we are seeing single disc openers that leave the fine dust on top - smooth and loose. The use of these drlls on light lentil stubble offers nothing to hold the soil down. This year we have witnessed the worst blowing that we have seen in our farming career. The spring rains never came until June 13 and May was hot and windy. Now many farmers have a pile of work trying to repair the damage to crops, fields and our beautiful drainage projects. So the wheels on the bus do go round and round. Man does not from history. High speed discing may be ok in other soil and weather conditions, but here in the Wascana Flats it can be very dangerous. I am interested in how Agrivillers feel about the evolution of seeding equipment and can only speak to gumbo conditions. MHO Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 13:26 77
Quote Originally Posted by farmaholic View Post
Case. But tweety's point is you're only starting with 2.1 lbs. ...not alot of room for peril loses.
half the drills in the country will be lucky if half the seed grows this year so your back to square 1 ..... Reply With Quote
fjlip's Avatar Jun 15, 2017 | 17:26 78 20 year old 5710 worth near ZERO...seeded at 4.2 lbs/acreName:  005.jpg
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Jun 15, 2017 | 18:27 79
Quote Originally Posted by fjlip View Post
20 year old 5710 worth near ZERO...seeded at 4.2 lbs/acreName:  005.jpg
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looks good fj , but probably worth more than our morris maxim . bourgault has better resale , lol Reply With Quote
Jun 17, 2017 | 08:16 80 As of today, for those interested..
Here is our terrible, shitty canola seeded with our Bourgault.....4.7 lbs



And the canola with planter ... 2 lbs


Seeded same day .
Not saying the planter is the end all be all , just interesting at this point Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jun 17, 2017 | 08:18 81 Looks like 64 bu/ac to me! But I might be a bit early and overly optimistic! Reply With Quote
Jun 17, 2017 | 08:30 82 Well that's it! I saw a skip in the planter field. No planter for us. Ha.

Looks good. What was the TKW again on the field wit planter? Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jun 17, 2017 | 08:58 83
Quote Originally Posted by Braveheart View Post
Well that's it! I saw a skip in the planter field. No planter for us. Ha.

Looks good. What was the TKW again on the field wit planter?
It wasn't the planter, it was cutworms! Reply With Quote
Jun 17, 2017 | 09:26 84 Same seed lot , 45CS40 , 5.1 tkw
Seeded in same field .
160 with ole Bourgault, and 155 with planter Reply With Quote
Jun 17, 2017 | 09:35 85 Beautiful canola furrow. Hope you get your rain you need Reply With Quote
Jun 17, 2017 | 18:22 86 Corn 🌽.. with Horsch

32,400 seeds / ac Reply With Quote
Jun 17, 2017 | 18:59 87
Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
Corn 🌽.. with Horsch

32,400 seeds / ac
Ouch. Why such poor singulation and spacing? Reply With Quote
Jun 17, 2017 | 21:25 88 Ya , it's terrible in dry sand Reply With Quote
ColevilleH2S's Avatar Jun 17, 2017 | 22:16 89
Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
Ya , it's terrible in dry sand
What happened to last year's crop residue? Reply With Quote
Jun 18, 2017 | 01:24 90 Dalek , very first run in corn with this unit.. ever.
New too us tractor and planter, I thought it was ok . Considering it was the first few acres. It is better beyond this but whatever. Did not think that was terrible, but you are corn country for sure .
I am sure like canola there are, many more guys here with more vast expertise on corn canola seed / row spacing that do a much better jod . And that's great.
Are you willing to post pictures to show better or worse ? ?
We have been seeding corn for 12 years with ole JD planters and they have been ok but not at 8 to 8.5 mph like that .
We run the JD's at 4.5 and can't get that constant , maybe we suck . Just curious is all about how it was so bad???
What did we do wrong ? Just hope not to do it again ,
I can't wait to post the picture of the seed master with the speacial corn roller beside the 30 year ole JD 8 row .
I am not being an ass , but it is was it is .
Give me a day to do that . The seed master corn is terrible , way worse than the ole JD and or the Horsch.
30 % of the plants are still way way to close together to produce a viable cob with the "master " , at $90 - $100 / ac seed that's huge . But just my opinion
I hope it's not terrible , I am concerned now.
Again just sharing info, and explaining the info
Always willing to learn from others Reply With Quote