Planter / drill

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Planter / drill

Jun 12, 2017 | 15:41 31 As far as wheat or winter wheat most of us have known for many many years that narrower row spacing is key for higher yields . That's been proven for 30 plus years .... almost everywhere Reply With Quote
Jun 12, 2017 | 15:44 32 Canola not so much , unless you sole intent is selling seed and fungicide . Then ya , keeping seed rates higher on narrow row spacing is a win win for you. Not so much for the grower Reply With Quote
Jun 12, 2017 | 16:07 33
Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
12 in spacing in corn would never get a mature cob in this part of the world .
Is all that research you quoted from north west Sask ??
Actually the narrow row yield increase in corn (15" vs 30") is more consistent the further north you go in the US. That is to say the shorter growing seasons encountered in Michigan and Minnesota are where the most benefit is seen. If distance apart is the objective 15" rows give you that better than 30". Think about it - the rows may be 30" apart one way but the plants are 6" from each other in the row. With 15" rows you can seed 12" apart in the row - more space, better canopy, less weeds. Reply With Quote
Jun 12, 2017 | 16:11 34 Check the cobs when you do that
I think we could go to 20 in
But that also would depend on plant populations. Reply With Quote
Jun 12, 2017 | 16:38 35 We solid seeded last year with a Bourgalt airseeder at 30,000 plants and cobs were great. Seeded at 28,000 this year with the planter. We'll see how it does. Reply With Quote
Jun 12, 2017 | 17:15 36 That will be interesting for sure .
Corn needs at least 5 in space between seeds to produce good cobs . The 75-80.% feed value comes from good mature cobs not just plants Reply With Quote
Jun 12, 2017 | 17:49 37 We and many of our neighbors plant our irrigated canola on 22" spacing. There is no yield hit compared to an air drill with narrower spacing. We seed at 2lbs, rather than 5 with the air drill.

On dry land, we have seen a yield hit. At the wider spacing, the plant needs to flower/branch longer. If it's short of water at that time, it won't branch enough to make up for the wider spacing Reply With Quote
Jun 12, 2017 | 19:29 38 Name:  IMG_0625.jpg
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Ya this shitty Seedmaster has to hit the road too. Total trash.. 3.9 Ibs (4.5 tkw) ... 375# fert at 4.8mph... no fert seed placed..no rain yet 😢... Did some crosshatch 45 deg trials with 12" spacing a couple times already over the years.. No yield increase in cereals. Decreased yield in lentils.. Zero difference in canola.. Reply With Quote
blackpowder's Avatar Jun 12, 2017 | 22:28 39 Interesting comments on row spacing. Things do change but i used a 12" machine single row for 2 yrs and did not like it.
Every plant on earth has an optimum density. My planter comment was regarding not only the independent opener aspect but precision metering and gravity drop of seed.
Very evident in my soybean plot this year. 1 bushel the acre shows to me at least the limitations of air delivery systems from one auger.
Not to mention the funky stuff that can be done when each opener unit computer controlled.
However, I'm not a gaurenteed pay guy so I could be full of shit.
Nice pics guys. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 00:18 40 Looks great JD
This is totally not about not what's better or not as a seeding tool
Let's not be pig headed farmers here
I was just sharing info that others might find interesting..... or not
There are tremendous air drills out there , and yes Tweety ours is not the greatest for canola . I do not need to be ridiculed on that asshole . But I will send pictures if you wish of all the crops seeded with that outfit and data for the 8 years we ran it do far. Trust me , it's done more than ok over the years. I will pm you if you want them.
Just trying to share info to those who may find it interesting.
Never once , ever , did I say it was better than anything else . Just sharing info
As far as being years behind , you may want to pull your head right if you Ass Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 00:48 41 Apparently you can't share somewhat positive info here with out getting trashed .... sad
Good luck for the rest of the crop year guys. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 00:55 42 Everything I grow except hay goes through the same old White planter. 30" corn and azuki beans, 15" soys and 10" winter wheat although every third wheat row goes through the dry fert box. Next spring the row units will be on a frame I designed so I can twin row the corn and azukis on whatever spacing I want. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 06:57 43
Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
Apparently you can't share somewhat positive info here with out getting trashed .... sad
Good luck for the rest of the crop year guys.
Don't stop sharing information furrow. I can't speak for everyone obviously but I appreciate the information. Its always good to learn. Too many guys are close minded. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 07:07 44
Quote Originally Posted by skfarmer707 View Post
Don't stop sharing information furrow. I can't speak for everyone obviously but I appreciate the information. Its always good to learn. Too many guys are close minded.
Times 2. Some needed to be viewed like the old question. If a tree falls in the forest and there is nobody there to hear it,does it make a sound. Its always good to hear what others are trying.
Last edited by grefer; Jun 13, 2017 at 07:11.
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Jun 13, 2017 | 07:10 45 Furrow I thought the information and pics was awesome. Craig Shaw from Lacombe has been doing trials for a few years comparing results between using a planter and an air drill for canola. I have certainly considered having 2 drills, one for cereals and one for canola. Unfortunately I am to small of an operator to justify that. Looking at JDGreen's pics maybe the seedmaster is the best compromise. Seedmaster is more affordable than a bourgault. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 07:18 46 I see guys protilling in the fall entire fields ....seeding with bourgault drills ...and harrowing after....


I thought the practice was long gone.

Ask yourselves this....if you burnoff... float the fertilizer ....and seed with discers. ...do you think the crop would be any worse for the equipment costs? Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 07:26 47 Furrow,good for you that you are running seeding trials. Your information is very informative. Keep it up! Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 07:39 48 For sure furrow ....keep posting....

It only takes one field to start a trend.

The planter spaces perfectly and depth control is good if I read and see right. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 07:48 49 Me too furrow , i find it really interesting. Thanks for taking the time
Just have to ignore the ignorant ones Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 10:14 50 Yes Furrow keep posting! Your posts get me thinking of how I can improve things around here and find them valuable.
I sure can't help but notice that the people that are dry and want rain real bad sure have nice looking canola! Reply With Quote
farmaholic's Avatar Jun 13, 2017 | 10:33 51
Quote Originally Posted by seldomseen View Post
Yes Furrow keep posting! Your posts get me thinking of how I can improve things around here and find them valuable.
I sure can't help but notice that the people that are dry and want rain real bad sure have nice looking canola!

Ah-hem, ah-hem.....I posted about the best looking spot. Read the post about the bi-polar emotional roller coaster.....

But if that's directed at me thanks for the complement.

Take care. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 11:25 52
Quote Originally Posted by furrowtickler View Post
Canola not so much , unless you sole intent is selling seed and fungicide . Then ya , keeping seed rates higher on narrow row spacing is a win win for you. Not so much for the grower
Regarding canola, maybe go back read the research. As the row spacing got wider, the yield went down. No matter how many posts you make, that won't change.

Absolutely its great to post "new" ideas, but the corn planter with canola idea has yet to show a benefit. Trend or not. Once flea beetles take a pound, frost another pound, cutworms another pound, that 2 pounds of seed you saved looks pretty expensive. Let alone the additional passes you need to make to fertilize, the disturbance, the erosion, moisture loss, the eq time, the....
Last edited by tweety; Jun 13, 2017 at 11:32.
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Jun 13, 2017 | 12:33 53 For canola the paralink systems are awesome(seedmaster/seedhawk), when there is abundant moisture ( within 1/4 inch of the soil surface) . The problem with these drills is the maximum depth you can seed, which is roughly 1 inch of soil over the seed. In hot dry hurricane winds the germ can be iffy in places. Add they don't like trash or straw ( the old beaver huts ). So if you do seed and get a depth of 1 inch soil over the seed the ground dries out much faster due to the fert opener below the seed, plus salt of fert effect ( drying). Again if it's 1 inch deep then a driving windy rain, the furrow sides wash over the seed and ... - then it's two inches deep with a crust starting to form on the soil surface.

No machine is perfect, they all have a place, complexity, weather conditions, field finish,calibrations, etc etc

I do like the though provoking ideas, and thoughts on the forums, it's a big part of why I do what I do. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 12:39 54 Furrow, I will be disappointed if you quit joining us. Please don't let one comment affect the great posts you share here. I've taken a few jabs but I just say, "good thing I don't need to kiss his arse". Click your heels and post on👍. Sometimes words just come across wrong, but we gotta test the water. Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 12:50 55 Like I tell my kids.....be the bigger person.... there will always be naysayers or people that don't agree but that's what makes it all worth reading.... Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 17:15 56 great thread , thanks furrow , we always knew narrow in wheat was good.
4 inch was the best 30 years ago.
neighbour is starting to make me look bad, again , just beautiful crops.
he is done spraying , today spraying some magic potion ,
i assume liquid fert.

need guys like that to sharpen our game.

but my 3310 bour. gives me good results , in spite of me .
almost foolproof. not a lot precision here , cold as it was , should have been shallower, just lots of fert. and hope for the best. kinda works out . most of the time .
what i did notice is, had different canola varieties , side by side , one with lubriderm, one without
like night and day.
i did not fry the canola with too much phos, it was bugs that thinned it out
more than twice the stand Reply With Quote
Jun 13, 2017 | 17:27 57 Craig's conclusion after 3 years:

"The big question mark is whether a precision drill is worth the expenditure, especially in an environment where it’s exclusively used for canola seeding,” said Shaw. “As you move further south into country that grows corn, sugar beets and soy, you’d have more acres you could use that kind of planter on, so it would be easier to warrant that additional expense. But up here, it’s a significant cost when you can only use it for a single crop.”.

His three-year on-farm trial now complete, Shaw has returned the borrowed planter to the Lacombe research station — and isn’t planning on buying one for his operation.

“The reality is that the planter isn’t the be-all and end-all answer to every issue,” he said. “Yup, it improved certain things and made achieving consistency easier. But what we really saw was that environment is critical.

“The more things you can get right at planting — the No. 1 factor being good residue management — the better the odds that you can get away with reduced seeding rates. It’s a package concept — the better the seedbed you put it into, the better those seeds are going to do, regardless of how you get them in the ground.” Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:02 58 There is a lot of huge $600,000 plus drills everywhere that used for exclusively canola
Your thread is bunk ... Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:06 59 And yes they work very well

One interesting note after doing yield tests for over 20 years , my neighbour has an ole "shitty" Bourgault 8800 drill, piece of junk ..... hmmmm , always in the top three .... hmmmmmm
Out of 75 plus guys . Must be the shitty Bourgault I guess Reply With Quote
Jun 15, 2017 | 00:10 60 And the other 74 , are running everything you can imagine in between .
Never a perfect drill .
It's the wizard not the wand Reply With Quote