TB

Beef Production

Tools

TB

Blaithin's Avatar Oct 29, 2016 | 20:39 1 Well the news broke on TB today. So far the most informative article I've found is in the producer. Shocking as that is compared to CBC and Global!

Feel bad for the farms definitely but there is some sketchy info coming out on Facebook. Some lady saying the CFIA is culling ALL her animals - horses, dogs, cats and cows - all without tests being done yet. Which I find to believe.

Also seen mentions of those good old Americans trying to blame us for their animal LOL

http://www.producer.com/2016/10/tb-case-jolts-southern-alta-beef-producers/ Reply With Quote
Oct 29, 2016 | 21:29 2 That's a tough situation for the ranchers in that area, particularly given the timing. Wonder if they'll find the source in the Elk population on Suffield? Maybe not - this has been a persistent problem in certain areas of SW England since the 1970s and the badger population is the host. Reply With Quote
Blaithin's Avatar Oct 29, 2016 | 21:41 3 Yeah timing is never good but this is definitely an even worse time of year.

I know quite a few U.K. farmers and the hoops they have to jump through because of TB is ridiculous. As unfortunate as it would be if the CFIA actually does call for culling all animals on the positive farms, I can understand the desire to keep this from becoming an issue here like in the U.K. (Even though nobody there has ever heard of cats and dogs being transmitters) Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2016 | 06:37 4 There have been TB issues in Manitoba for years now around Riding Mountain National Park. It was a problem in the elk in the park, but it's getting very well controlled now. A zone around the park was created, and those unfortunate to live there have had to go through regular testing for years now. They needed permits to move csttle, and all kinds of tracking went on. It's a real pain, but it's working.

People who had TB found in their herds did lose all their livestock, including family dogs. Pretty heartbreaking if you have kids. Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2016 | 07:21 5 That's strange they only cull reactors in the UK, not the whole herd. Reactors to the tuberculin skin test that is - all herds were tested there every 4 years if I remember correctly. Reply With Quote
Blaithin's Avatar Oct 30, 2016 | 10:13 6
Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
That's strange they only cull reactors in the UK, not the whole herd. Reactors to the tuberculin skin test that is - all herds were tested there every 4 years if I remember correctly.
The UK has an outbreak though and a known common transmitter so they handle it differently than a TB free country would I assume.

We don't want to have a problem so culling is harsh where if the Uk culled every "index herd" entirely it would quickly lower the number of cows!

Talking to a dairy pal in the badger cull zone he used to have to test his herd every 60 days and they weren't allowed outside for two years. Now they're allowed out and he has to test every twelve months.

Can't say I'd want to have to deal with that! Reply With Quote
Oct 30, 2016 | 10:30 7 It's not so difficult to routine test a dairy herd as they are in the yard every day. A bit less convenient for a beef herd but we tested at one time for brucellosis every year and TB was done at the same time either every 3rd or 4th year.
They have really gone to town on health schemes over there since the F&M outbreak in 2001. The cattle sold at purebred breeding sales are classified into category 1-5 risk with the more things you test and are proven clear of the more chance of getting #1 category which is lowest risk. Herds are typically tested for TB every 4th year (in areas where there is no TB), also tested and culled for Johne's as well as having to achieve BVD accredited status through testing but then double vaccinated against BVD within a time period before the sale. I don't know why they don't just vaccinate everything for BVD and be done with it. Reply With Quote
Nov 2, 2016 | 19:19 8
Quote Originally Posted by grassfarmer View Post
That's a tough situation for the ranchers in that area, particularly given the timing. Wonder if they'll find the source in the Elk population on Suffield? Maybe not - this has been a persistent problem in certain areas of SW England since the 1970s and the badger population is the host.
Herd on news tonight that it is suspected to have come from Suffield Elk herd. I wonder if they will eradicate them too? Or will they just spread them out like Sask wildlife did with the CWD problem in deer and call it an eradication. Reply With Quote
Nov 2, 2016 | 21:22 9 It was elk in Manitoba. It's been years now, but a lot of progress has been made. It's taken years of hard work, and a lot of frazzled nerves to get it settled. If it is elk in Alberta, this will not be over in a short time. Reply With Quote
Blaithin's Avatar Nov 3, 2016 | 09:26 10 I'm sure they'll test the Elk and see as they're they most obvious source, although that doesn't mean they are the source. The last case of TB, which was in BC, the source was never found.

If it is in the Suffield herd I'm sure their management will become very similar to those in Riding Mountain in Manitoba. They'll probably lower the Elk numbers and then all farms within a distance of the base and the Elk will begin routine testing for TB. Wood Buffalo also has TB in the bison but measures are taken there as well to prevent the spread to cattle. Reply With Quote