2001 Apple Crop reply

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2001 Apple Crop reply

tlr
Feb 9, 2002 | 12:23 1 Hi, we purchased an old farmstead in Pictou County, NS, in Sept. 2000. There are a number of varieties of apple trees growing here, all of which have been neglected for quite some time by the looks of them. I do not know what types they are. That fall all of the trees had a lot of apples on them, and we therefore had 9-12 deer in the yard every evening. This year, after a very dry summer (our well went dry) the apple crop was severely diminished. Some trees produced no apples at all, and others only small and deformed fruit. We did some pruning of dead wood last winter, which may have affected their fruit production, in shocking them after being left to their own devices for so long. I did notice however, some wild trees along the roadside that were loaded with apples. I am thinking that location to water supply was a key factor in production last summer. Reply With Quote
Feb 11, 2002 | 06:44 2 During periods of draught I have noted that those orchards located on deep well drained soils and well-managed are the least affected by drought. Controlling weed competition and leaf feeding insect will also help to offset the negative impact of drought. The trees that did well for you are like located on soils that allow for deeper rooting and access to moisture. Pruning out dead wood from a tree will have no impact on growth. It is when you prune out live tissue that tree growth will be affected. Pruning out live wood should stimulated new shoot growth and renew fruit spurs which in turn should give you larger apples. The difference in cropping that you have noted is likely due to biannual bearing. A big crop followed by no crop. All the energy goes into growing the crop and nothing is left for flower bud formation for next years crop. The small-deformed apples likely are a result of insect damage and the apple disease apple scab. Reply With Quote