PETA No Dairy Campaign

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PETA No Dairy Campaign

Oct 30, 2001 | 11:16 1 The following is an article from Animal Net at the University of Guelph. I'd be curious to hear how and what the dairy industry is planning to do with respect to this newest challenge.

PEOPLE FOR THE ETHICAL TREATMENT OF ANIMALS NO-DAIRY CAMPAIGN COMES TO
CANADA
October 29, 2001
The Canadian Press
A U.S.-based animal rights group that believes milk makes kids fat, pimply
and gassy is, according to this story, bringing its anti-dairy campaign to
elementary school children in Canada. Bruce Friedrich, vegan campaign
co-ordinator for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, was quoted as
saying, "Kids want and deserve to be told the truth."
The story says that the campaign begins in Ontario on Tuesday and will move
across the country in the next few weeks. School children can expect to be
greeted by a person in a cow suit handing out trading cards stating that
obesity, acne, excess mucous and flatulence are all caused by milk
consumption.
The cards depict four children - Windy Wanda, Loogie Louie, Pimply Patty and
Chubby Charlie - who have suffered what PETA considers to be the adverse
effects of milk.
"Eat fat and you'll be fat. Be kind to animals and to your butt and gut by
avoiding fattening dairy products," reads one card.
"Try a fruity smoothie instead of an ice-cream sundae. You'll look fabulous
and have loads of energy too."
More than 125,000 cards in the Milk Sucks campaign have been distributed to
children in the United States and Britain so far.
Friedrich said the campaign is also designed to educate children about the
abuse suffered by farm animals on factory farms.
Therese Beaulieu, spokeswoman for the Dairy Farmers of Canada, was cited as
disputing PETA's claims of systemic animal abuse in the industry and that if
there were abuse, farmers would be charged under cruelty laws.
Registered dietitian Pat McCarthy-Briggs of the Manitoba Milk Producers was
outraged the group would be allowed anywhere near children with a message
that could adversely affect children's health, stating, "The age they're
going to go after, these kids are just on the cusp of bone growth. Calcium
in milk is the gold standard against which other calcium (sources) are
measured.''
The Canada Food Guide recommends children aged four to nine have at least
two to three servings of dairy products daily. Reply With Quote
Nov 1, 2001 | 18:05 2 The challenges from PETA are not new to the dairy industry. This particular campaign was due to be launched in Ottawa the week of September 11. For obvious reasons it was delayed so the industry has had time to prepare for this particular event. There have been many over the last several years. DFC is planning a national meeting with provincial marketing, nutrition and administrative staff later in November to begin work on a national communication strategy to deal with this type of issue. A number of organizations within the dairy industry have been reacting to these campaigns however we all agree that a more organized/coordinated approach will be in our best interest. Reply With Quote